Posts Tagged ‘with an ASD’

ASD in children

Friday, June 10th, 2011

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a neurological disorder which affects more boys than girls. Generally ASD is diagnosed before a child reaches three years of age.

ASD in children will typically affect how the child interacts, behaves and communicates with others. This is commonly known as the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits and will affect all children with an ASD, in varying degrees.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments are typical to Autism Spectrum Disorder and can be treated with intervention strategies designed to help children with an ASD overcome their social skills deficits.

Intervention strategies like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards are commonly used to help the ASD child understand and cope with situations and skills that they are struggling with or find stressful, like for example recess, asking questions and making friends.

Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Grey as a means of communication with the children she was working.

Social skills stories comprise of four sentence types; Perspective, Directive, Descriptive and control and will generally follow a set formula.

Typically for the ASD child social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with an ASD.

No two autistic kids will ever be the same, and we all use different terminology, therefore most social skills stories are written in word format which means that they are easy to edit.

Generally most autistic kids are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures. It is therefore important to use visual supports like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards.

ASD in children is not cure-able but by using visual supports like social skills stories YOU will find teaching an ASD child social skills can be considerably improved.

Social skills stories use first person text and visual images in a manner that all kids with autism will find easy to understand. A social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan.

Parents, caregivers, teachers and assistants can use any social skills story without any formal training. They can be downloaded, edited, printed and implemented easily and for most situations and skills the child is struggling with.

To learn more teaching an ASD child social skills using social stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find social stories to download.

 

Address healthy hygiene habits in teens with autism

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Scores of parents of teens with autism worry that they will not “fit in”. This concern is heightened by the autistic teenager’s difficulties in mastering hygiene abilities and routines, particularly hygiene difficulties surrounding puberty, such as autistic girls and menstruation.
Hygiene abilities are essential life abilities but for lots of autistic teenagers developing healthy hygiene habits can be difficult . As a result direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is important.
For a lot of parents of young adults with autism puberty can be very stressful, parents look for ways to clarify puberty and educate healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism. Parents turn increasingly towards autistic supports like as social skills stories, designed to assist them to deal with this challenging period in their child’s life.

Social abilities stories were originally developed as a means of communication, but soon grew in popularity and use. At present social abilities stories are used more extensively to teach social, imagination and communication abilities and behaviours as well as a method of communication.

Using appropriate language and visual images, social stories are used as autistic supports for individuals with an ASD and similar conditions. The social story offers the teen with autism with a role model of precisely how to master the situation or skill.

The social story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, where, why, what and when as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, emotions and thoughts of others. Focusing on the foremost key questions and cutting out all the frills, individuals with an ASD respond well to autistic supports such as social stories, which relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more at ease with and in the situation.

Consequently many parents of teens with autism make use of social skills stories to instruct healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism.

Parents of autistic teens put into practice social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:

? autism and going to the bathroom
? puberty and autistic girls
? autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant
? autistic girls and menstruation
? taking a shower
? taking a bath

As well as addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism, social stories also help to teach many autistic hygiene issues, all significant to a healthy life style.

To download social abilities stories for dealing with healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism as well as addressing healthy hygiene issues in autistic teens you can visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

From this website you can instantly  download 20 social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teens and children.

Other social skills stories for autistic teens dealing with puberty, school, friendships and other related concerns are found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Social stories on other social and communication difficulties can be found at:
http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Writing Social Stories for children with autism

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

What are social stories?

 

Social stories are short descriptive stories which explain a skill or situation in terms of relative social cues, perspectives and common responses in a defined manner, using pictures or images and first person text, much like a comic script.

 

The goal of a Social Story is to present accurate information in a consistent and reassuring manner that children with autism can easily understand.

 

Social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago to help with communication difficulties in children with an ASD. Today, Social Stories are not only ideal for children with an ASD but are also a positive approach for adolescents and young people with autism and related communication disorders.

 

For children with an ASD communication both verbal and non verbal is an area of marked weakness, this is mainly due to social skills deficits which are common to all individuals with autism.

 

What are social skills deficits?

 

Social skills deficits are sometimes referred to as the triad of autistic impairments:

Social skills deficits

Communication deficits

Imagination deficits

 

These deficits are always present in individuals with autism to varying degrees, as with typically developing children no two ASD children are ever the same and development will vary.

 

Social Stories are used to focus on a specific skill or situation the child on the spectrum is struggling with for example: changes to routines, for most ASD children any changes to routines no matter how small can be a real problem, using a social story to explain the upcoming change can help reassure and prevent anxiety and stress.

 

Writing social stories for children with autism is an effective way of dealing with issues. A social story should contain Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and control sentences always be from the child’s point of view and in first person text.

 

Children on the spectrum tend to be visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, this concept is used in most social stories. The social story should map out the skill or situation using images and text. Answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, this is an area of weakness to individuals with autism.

 

A social story is like a role model or visual framework showing the social cues.  Social stories need no formal training to use and are editable, no two children are the same and we all use different terminology, therefore generally most social stories will need slight tweaks to make the content relevant to your child.

 

To learn more about implementing social stories and get downloads of social stories which have been already written for you to save you time visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will also gather information on writing social stories for children with autism as well as info on what are social stories and why do they help?

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Explain what social skills stories are

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Children with autism spectrum disorder HAVE social skills deficits and do not learn social and communication skills in the typical manner and unlike normally developing children do need direct teaching.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories ARE used to help teach children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills

 

Social skills stories are a powerful teaching strategy, a good social story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction, breaking it down into smaller easier to understand sections.

 

A social story will provide the child on the spectrum with accurate information which is important because a child on the spectrum will often find social situations confusing.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories can be used for various situations and skills that the child on the spectrum may be struggling with for example:  hygiene skills, making conversation, asking questions, respecting personal space, sharing, taking turns, recess, PE lessons and so on…

 

Using visual images a social story depicts the situation by means of relevant social cues and answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

 

It is probably easier to explain what social skills stories are by giving an example of how a social story can be implemented and used to help a child on the spectrum deal with a situation or skill that they are struggling with.

 

For example: your child with an ASD may struggle to make friends, this will be mainly due to their social skills deficits; having social skills deficits is common to autism. The social story can help the child with an ASD approach a potential friend and give them suggestions of possible outcomes, what to say and how to act as well as what the other child may expect of them i.e. respecting personal space etc.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories are implemented and used for children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories need no formal training to use, are normally written in word format or PDF, can be personalized and edited to make them suitable for all ages and abilities. No two autistic individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore social skills stories can need altering for different autistic individuals.

For a list of 100 downloadable social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social Stories for Autistic Children

Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

Due to social skills deficits children with autism need special INTERVENTION STRATEGIES to learn social skills. Social Stories for Autistic Children and visual support cards are two effective autism teaching aids that can be used.

 

Children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills this is known as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

Having social skills deficits will affect how autistic children view themselves and those people around them. Typically autistic children tend to be involved in their own world and not interested in interacting with people around them.

 

It is because of the triad of autistic impairments and issues such as sensory processing issues which mean children with an ASD  require Intervention Strategies and autism teaching aids to help them function and cope.

 

Probably the most popular autism teaching aids are social stories for autistic children and visual support cards, both of which are excellent Intervention Strategies, ARE easy to implement and need no formal training to use.

 

Social Stories are short descriptive stories like a comic strip which use pictures or images to teach children with an ASD social, communication and imagination skills, and help overcome social skills deficits.

 

Social stories use visual images to describe a social situation in terms of the relevant social cues in a manner a child with autism can better understand. The images and first person text will show the child with autism verbal and non verbal cues.

 

A good social skills story will act as a visual plan or role model for the child with autism to follow. Social stories can be used for various situations and skills effectively such as: asking questions, being fair, calming down, eating new foods, making friends and so on. Social stories are also used in schools to help children with autism understand and cope with school, for example recess, assembly, P.E and so on.

 

A social skills story breaks the skill into smaller easier to understand sections and answers the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and gives an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is a known weakness in autism.

 

To learn more about social stories for autistic children and get downloads of appropriate social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

To learn more about other autism teaching aids such as visual support cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Other sites with autism teaching aids are: http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.org.uk

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Unlike typically developing children, a child on the spectrum WILL ONLY display inappropriate or odd behaviours for a reason an internal or external factor, NOT out of boredom, mischief or simply for the hell of it!

 

Generally individuals on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore, when considering techniques and strategies which can help combat autistic behaviour difficulties those techniques and methods should be VISUAL.

 

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories can have a profound effect for children on the spectrum helping overcome many of the difficulties they face daily.

 

Deficits in social, communication and imagination skills ARE a common weakness in autism, and the major reason for most autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

All individuals on the spectrum WILL certainly have deficits in social, communication and imagination skills. However the degree of deficits will depend on the autistic individual.

 

Commonly, Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties ARE implemented by parents, in schools, colleges and can be used to HELP a child on the spectrum UNDERSTAND AND COPE with a situation, event or skill that is causing them distress, confusion or fear.

 

Social Skills Stories WILL encourage positive behaviours, and reduce unwanted and negative situations and behaviours.

 

Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior  

 

A social story will act as a role model, like a visual framework detailing the key points of the skills or behaviour and showing visually what is happening.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of weakness for people with autism.

 

Generally people with autism have difficulties understanding that other people may not share their interests and may have different opinions. By using Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties YOU can help the individual with an ASD realise that people are all different with varying opinions and likes and dislikes.

 

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive pieces of first person text with visual images showing a skill in visual comic like fashion allowing the individual with an ASD to practise the skill or behaviour, helping them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

To learn more about popular Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior where you will find information on social skills stories as well as downloads of appropriate social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties

 

Other sites with social stories can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Children with ASD need social skills

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Research indicates that social impairments ARE a common symptom of autism, and that all individuals with autism will have social impairments of varying degrees dependant on their own personal level of ability.

 

Commonly, all children with ASD struggle with social skills and need direct teaching using Intervention Strategies designed specifically for this.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills and behaviours naturally through watching and copying their peers and parents and directly from their environment etc.

 

Children with ASD need social skills teaching; they will not naturally mimic or interpret and learn social or communication skills. A child with an ASD will have difficulties following instruction unless the instruction or information is presented in a manner which they can readily understand.

 

We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are in-fact VISUAL THINKERS AND LEARNERS. This means that they think in pictures a bit like a movie script playing, and will not easily understand information that is written or spoken.

 

Consequently, appropriate Intervention Strategies ARE needed which ARE visual, such as PECS, Flash cards and social stories.

 

Unlike typically developing children a child with an ASD will not readily accept changes or transition and can become stressed and overwhelmed by tasks, skills and activities the rest of us think of as “everyday” or “normal”, like for example brushing your teeth, visiting a dentist, getting a haircut, recess, respecting personal space, making friends and so on.

 

Social Stories ARE perfect Intervention Strategies which were first introduced by therapist Carol Gray twenty years ago to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with. Today Social Stories ARE used not only to HELP autistic children master communication skills both verbal and non-verbal but also to HELP children on the spectrum learn new skills, cope with changes to routines, transitions and encourage positive behaviours.

 

Social Stories USE visual images LIKE A VISUAL PLAN OR ROLE MODEL to describe a situation or skill in terms of relevant “social cues”, like a comic script conversation.

 

A social skills story is normally written in first person text and in a manner that children on the spectrum WILL BETTER understand.

 

Social stories break the skill down in to smaller sections the relevant “social cues” removing the fluff and un-necessary language, in a set formula of 4 main sentence types: Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and Control sentences.

 

Intervention Strategies such as a social skills story should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of those around them, which WILL HELP to reduce stress and confusion.

 

For example a social skills story written to help explain the need to brush your teeth would explain visually and with first person relevant text the “wh” questions why and how as well as what the consequence of not brushing would be – tooth ache etc. This story may start something like this:

 

It is important that I brush my teeth twice a day, I can brush them every morning and before I go to bed at night. 

AND SO ON…

To learn more about HOW YOU CAN HELP Children with ASD need social skills teaching USING methods like social stories visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

ASD and social skills stories

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

A social story is written to help a person with ASD address social skills deficits and pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.


Children on the spectrum do not naturally acquire social and communication skills and lack he ability to interact with others effectively, this is due to social skills deficits. Social skills need to be taught directly through deliberate treatments and intervention strategies.


Teaching children with ASD social skills using intervention strategies


Probably the most significant of the various intervention strategies are social skills stories. Social skills stories can be easily implemented and used to teach the social and communication skills and behaviours that the child with an ASD is struggling with.


Having social impairments is much like being dropped in a foreign country with no idea where or how to get home or communicate. Children on the spectrum will need intervention strategies to acquire functional and age-appropriate social skills, make friendships, and learn communication skills.


We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual intervention strategies are excellent.


Visual intervention strategies


Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies. Written in first person text and using visual images and pictures to describe the situation or skill in detail, a social skills story break the skill into appropriate social cues, following a set formula the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation for the person with an ASD to follow.


Social skills stories provide concrete information on what people in a given situation are doing, thinking or feeling. The social skills story is like a visual plan showing the steps or sequence of events, identifying the significant social cues and their meaning, answering the important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why


For a child with an ASD social stories should describe social situations, contexts, and the likely behaviours of others and provide an appropriate behavioural response cue that the child with an ASD can understand.


Therefore teaching children with an ASD social skills using intervention strategies LIKE social stories is beneficial.


For children with an ASD social skills stories act as a VISUAL PLAN OR FRAMEWORK that helps children with autism understand skills and behaviours that they struggle with.


To learn more about children with ASD and social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Teenage years with autism

Friday, November 5th, 2010

For the vast majority of us the teenage years are probably our most social years.

However for teenagers with an ASD this time can be incredibly confusing; moving from childhood, going through puberty, becoming sexually aware and ending up in adulthood, this rapidly moving social time can cause stress and anxieties.

Some teens with autism can become aware of how different they are from their peers, realise they don’t have many or any friends or a partner, or ideas for career choices.

For many teens with autism this will spur them on to learn appropriate social skills to “fit in”, for others it can mean isolation and in extreme circumstances even depression.

Deficits in social skills are the route cause of the majority of issues ASD teenagers encounter during this ever changing period of their lives.

For typically developing teenagers social skills are learnt naturally through watching, listening, intuition, gut feelings and good guess work! But for teenagers with an ASD these abilities are missing this is due to deficits in social skills.

Having a marked disability is social and communication skills can lead to social misunderstandings, for many parents, care givers and teachers this is a stressful and frustrating period in their teen’s life, being unable to communicate with your teen and watching them struggle socially is not easy.

However, there are excellent resources which can help the ASD teen address deficits in social skills; resources such as social skills stories are known to be beneficial around this time.

Developed primarily to aid communication difficulties social stories are a major tool used in autism to help teach and encourage appropriate social skills, address communication difficulties, prepare for changes to routines, transitions, teach age appropriate behaviours and social skills, teach about hygiene, puberty and other skills that they ASD teen is struggling with.

Social skills stories need no formal training to use; are editable which is a real bonus as no two ASD teenagers will ever be the same and we all use different expression and language.

Generally social stories are visual, individuals with autism are visual thinkers and learners; therefore autism resources which are visual are better understood and will have the greater impact for learning.

Using first person text and from the ASD teenagers point of view social skills stories for teens with autism are much like a role model, answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when, what as well as “how” plus giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

Social skills stories are easy to implement and can be used for a vast variety of skills, behaviours and situations, they are printable making them convenient and portable.

The teenage years with autism need not be to traumatic, using social stories as a strategy has proven effective for many teenagers with autism. To learn more about the teenage years with autism and how social skills stories for teens with autism can benefit your teenager visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autisticteen.html

Where you will find 65 social skills stories for teens with autism, on subjects like, puberty, hygiene, friendships, appropriate behaviours, social skills and many more.

Other sites offering social stories can be located at: 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents