Posts Tagged ‘visual strategies for improving communication’

Visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism

Monday, May 10th, 2010

A major area of concern for parents with autistic children is getting to grips with their child’s social and communication difficulties. It is a fact that all children with ASD show marked developmental deficits in social and communication skills.

 

Lacking the ability to understand communication both verbal and nonverbal is difficult. It is a lack of appropriate communication skills that can lead to social mistakes, bullying and inappropriate behaviours.

 

For many children with ASD routines are important and can be a cause of stress when the routine changes even the slightest change can cause anxieties.


Many schools now recognise the need to teach students with autism expressive communication skills. But fail to help teach those students with autism to understand why we communicate and how communication can help us in our everyday lives.

 

Research suggests that children with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners. This shows us that any information or social cues we wish to share with our autistic child will be better understood when the information is presented visually.

 

Consequently using visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism spectrum disorder has proven to be an effective means of helping children with ASD address their communication difficulties.

 

Visual strategies such as visual timetables, schedules, flash cards, PECS and social skills stories are all visual tools used for increasing communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorders.

 

Visual tools such as PECS, flash cards and social skills stories are important in helping your autistic child improve positive behaviours and independence, thus helping your autistic child to reach his or her full potential.

 

Looking at social skills stories as a strategy, introduced twenty years ago social skills stories are one of the major visual tools used today for improving communication difficulties. Difficulties such as asking questions, making friends, having a conversation, sharing, taking turns, saying Hi and so on…

 

A social story is a visual plan of a skill or behaviour the child with autism is struggling with. Using visual images and age appropriate first person text the social story breaks the skill or situation into small understandable chunks.  And answers the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what), as well giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, helping the child with autism to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

To find out more about visual strategies for improving communication difficulties in children with autism by using social skills stories as a strategy visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Treatments of autism

Monday, May 3rd, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a lifelong pervasive developmental disorder, which is not curable. Recent figures suggest on average 1 in every 300 children born will receive an autism diagnosis.

 

In most instances parents will receive their child’s autism diagnosis before the child reaches the age of three.

 

Social skills deficits are always present in individuals with autism. However the degree of social skills deficits will vary depending on the individual.

 

Generally early intervention is recommended and your G.P. will refer your child to the OT and speech therapist for further assessment.

 

However there are significant ways in which you can help improve your child’s social skills deficits. One of the most significant treatments of autism spectrum disorder recommended to help parents, teachers and care givers of children with autism spectrum disorder cope with, and improve the social skills deficits is social skills stories.

 

Research into the use of social skills stories suggests those parents, teachers and care givers that are using visual strategies for improving communication and social skills deficits such as social skills stories, report good success rates, in helping address their child’s social skills deficits, and cut down and in some cases eradicate negative and or aggressive behaviours.

 

Social skills stories used as visual strategies for improving communication and social skills and may benefit most autistic children. A social skills story is normally written by professionals and implemented to help the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder understand a skill or behaviour that they are struggling to master or that may be causing the stress and anxieties.

 

Developed twenty years ago to aid communication with autistic children the social skills story is now one of the most significant tools used to help encourage positive behaviours and teach social and communication skills. Using visual images and first person language an social skills story will describe the situation or skill from the child’s point of view.

 

Much like a comic script a social skills story will outline the situation or skill giving key focus to the main points and remove all the frills making the story easy to follow and understand helping answer the “wh” questions making the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation or skill that they are struggling to master.

 

To learn more about treatments of autism that will address your autistic childs social skills deficits visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find visual strategies for improving communication and social skills such as social skills stories.

 

Other sites containing social skills stories to address social skills deficits can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills