Posts Tagged ‘visual strategies’

Autistic spectrum disorder social difficulties

Friday, January 17th, 2014

Children with autistic spectrum disorder will have social difficulties regardless of their age or ability; this is thought to be due to the ‘triad of impairments’ which are common to autism.

 

What is the triad of impairments?

 

Are social skills deficits in three main areas, social skills, communication skills and imagination skills; all children with autistic spectrum disorder will have varying degrees of social skills deficits.

 

Methods of addressing autistic spectrum disorder social difficulties in communication skills.

 

All children with an autistic spectrum disorder experience communication difficulties. Although language itself may not be affected the way the child expresses themselves and uses language will almost certainly be affected. As will the way the child uses non-verbal language such as gestures and signals.

 

For many children with an autistic spectrum disorder understanding language is problematic and is one of the major causes of autistic social difficulties.

 

Imagine being dropped in a foreign land with no means of communication, where everybody talked in a way you could not totally understand, this is what it can be like to be autistic and have communication difficulties.

 

What we do know for certain is that the vast majority of autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think and digest information easier if the information is visual.

 

Therefore, visual strategies which can enable autistic children to understand what is happening around them, what is expected of them or that they can use to express themselves should always be visual.

 

With autistic spectrum disorder social difficulties the most common visual strategies used are social skills stories, PECS, flash cards and other visual strategies such as visual timetables, choices boards and mini schedules etc.

 

Developed twenty years ago social skills stories ARE a major tool for autism that can be implemented and used to address many social skills deficits.

 

Social stories are a major tool for autism which needs no formal training to use, can be edited and personalized.

 

A social skills story is a simple description using first person text and visual images or pictures of an everyday social situation, activity or event shown visually from the child’s perspective, much like a visual plan or framework and acting as a role model to the child.

 

For example, a social skills story can be used to help a child prepare for upcoming changes to routines, or learn appropriate social interactions for situations that they encounter.

 

The goal of the social skills story is to give the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill, change to routine or behaviour making them feel more relaxed and less anxious. Then, when the situation actually happens, the autistic child can use the story to help guide his or her behaviour.

 

Research shows that using social stories can have a positive affect on autistic spectrum disorder social difficulties, giving simple and clear descriptions of social cues and appropriate behaviours.

 

Generally social skills stories should follow a set pattern of sentence type. All social skills stories should be flexible and be editable, as we all use different language and expressions.

 

To learn more about how social stories can help address autistic spectrum disorder social difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social Skills Stories for Autistic Children

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

Typical to all children with autism spectrum disorder are deficits in social skills. This is often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits and can become a primary focus at school and in the home.

It is a lack of social awareness skills that can cause many children with autism to lack self-confidence.  However when the child’s social awareness skills are HELPED TO IMPROVE many parents and teachers report an increase in self-confidence with the autistic child.

Mostly children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and will gain more value from visual strategies rather than written, auditory or oral information.

Consequently visual strategies are believed to work best with Autism Spectrum Disorder Children. Social skills stories are used as visual strategies.

A social skills story is used to describe a situation or skill to the child on the spectrum. This WILL HELP to reduce anxieties, especially if the social story is being used to help with transitions, changes to routines or situations and skills the child on the spectrum finds stressful, confusing or CAN cause anxiety.

A social skills story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction and break it down into smaller easier to understand sections. The social skills story ACTS LIKE A ROLE MODEL or Visual plan providing VISUAL cues and information that the child with autism can understand.  

Social stories for autism answer the “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give the child with autism an insight into the thoughts feelings and possible reactions they may expect from others.

The main goal of any social skills story should be to provide Autism Spectrum Disorder Children with a visual framework which will help reduce anxieties and stress for the child with autism.

Typically social skills stories for autistic children are written in first person text following a set tried and trusted formula, which was first developed around twenty years ago.

 Autism Spectrum Disorder Children CAN use social skills stories for autistic children to deal with most situation and skills that they are struggling with or that cause anxiety. For example social skills stories can be used to HELP deal with “puberty” hygiene issues, social awkwardness and communication difficulties.

It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorders to display social awkwardness for example, with social interactions, such as respecting personal space, having conversations, asking questions etc. Social skills stories for autistic children can be used to help deal with these issues.

Social stories should provide information for kids with autism about the feelings of others and the consequences of ignoring those feelings.

Using visual images and short pieces of first person text social stories should ALWAYS be written from the child’s point of view.

No two kids with autism will ever be the same and as we all use different terminology social skills stories need to be editable.

To learn more about implementing social stories and how you can download professional social skills stories for autistic children today visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

 

ASD and social skills stories

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

A social story is written to help a person with ASD address social skills deficits and pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.


Children on the spectrum do not naturally acquire social and communication skills and lack he ability to interact with others effectively, this is due to social skills deficits. Social skills need to be taught directly through deliberate treatments and intervention strategies.


Teaching children with ASD social skills using intervention strategies


Probably the most significant of the various intervention strategies are social skills stories. Social skills stories can be easily implemented and used to teach the social and communication skills and behaviours that the child with an ASD is struggling with.


Having social impairments is much like being dropped in a foreign country with no idea where or how to get home or communicate. Children on the spectrum will need intervention strategies to acquire functional and age-appropriate social skills, make friendships, and learn communication skills.


We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual intervention strategies are excellent.


Visual intervention strategies


Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies. Written in first person text and using visual images and pictures to describe the situation or skill in detail, a social skills story break the skill into appropriate social cues, following a set formula the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation for the person with an ASD to follow.


Social skills stories provide concrete information on what people in a given situation are doing, thinking or feeling. The social skills story is like a visual plan showing the steps or sequence of events, identifying the significant social cues and their meaning, answering the important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why


For a child with an ASD social stories should describe social situations, contexts, and the likely behaviours of others and provide an appropriate behavioural response cue that the child with an ASD can understand.


Therefore teaching children with an ASD social skills using intervention strategies LIKE social stories is beneficial.


For children with an ASD social skills stories act as a VISUAL PLAN OR FRAMEWORK that helps children with autism understand skills and behaviours that they struggle with.


To learn more about children with ASD and social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Using printable social stories for autism

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2010

Using printable social stories for autism as a visual plan or framework is a powerful tool for teaching children on the autism spectrum. Social skills stories are visual representation of situations, social skills, behaviours or events that happen in our lives.

 

Children with autism struggle with social, communication and imagination skills; this is often referred to as social skills deficits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism spectrum disorder, but will vary in degree depending on the ability of the ASD child.

 

However social skills deficits are always present, therefore strategies are needed to help teach ASD children methods of overcoming these deficits in social skills.

 

By using printable social stories for autism you can help teach an ASD child a particular social, communication or imagination skill or behaviour that they may find problematic or confusing.

 

For example many children on the autism spectrum struggle with hygiene skills, sharing, taking turns and making friends, using visual strategies like social stories can help much like a role model,  using visual images, pictures and text like a comic strip.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that take a concrete approach to learning which will help ASD children to understand what is being said, how they should react and how to recognize situations that occur that they may be struggling with.

 

By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. Social skills stories should follow a specific formula of sentence types, be editable and easy to personalize as no two children are ever the same and we all use different vocabulary.

 

To find out more about using printable social stories for autism on issues such as hygiene visit:

http://www.autismsocialsories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Children with autistic spectrum disorder will have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age or ability; this is thought to be due to the “triad of impairments” which are common to autism.

 

What is the triad of impairments?

 

Are social skills deficits in three main areas, social skills, communication skills and imagination skills; all children with autistic spectrum disorder will have varying degrees of social skills deficits.

 

Methods of addressing autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties in communication skills.

 

All children with an autistic spectrum disorder experience communication difficulties. Although language itself may not be affected the way the child expresses themselves and uses language will almost certainly be affected. As will the way the child uses non-verbal language such as gestures and signals.

 

For many children with an autistic spectrum disorder understanding language is problematic and is one of the major causes of autistic behavioural difficulties.

 

Imagine being dropped in a foreign land with no means of communication, where everybody talked in a way you could not totally understand, this is what it can be like to be autistic and have communication difficulties.

 

What we do know for certain is that the vast majority of autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think and digest information easier if the information is visual.

 

Therefore, visual strategies which can enable autistic children to understand what is happening around them, what is expected of them or that they can use to express themselves should always be visual.

 

With autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties the most common visual strategies used are social skills stories, PECS, flash cards and other visual strategies such as visual timetables, choices boards and mini schedules etc.

 

Developed twenty years ago social skills stories ARE a major tool for autism that can be implemented and used to address many social skills deficits.

 

Social stories are a major tool for autism which needs no formal training to use, can be edited and personalized.

 

A social skills story is a simple description using first person text and visual images or pictures of an everyday social situation, activity or event shown visually from the child’s perspective, much like a visual plan or framework and acting as a role model to the autistic child.

 

For example, a social skills story can be used to help an autistic child prepare for upcoming changes to routines, or learn appropriate social interactions for situations that they encounter.

 

The goal of the social skills story is to give the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill, change to routine or behaviour making them feel more relaxed and less anxious. Then, when the situation actually happens, the autistic child can use the story to help guide his or her behaviour.

 

Research shows that using social stories can have a positive affect on autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties, giving simple and clear descriptions of social cues and appropriate behaviours.

 

Generally social skills stories should follow a set pattern of sentence type. All social skills stories should be flexible and be editable, as we all use different language and expressions.

 

To learn more about how social stories can help address autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for ASD

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Social stories can be used effectively as visual strategies for helping individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Developed around twenty years ago to help communication difficulties in ASD children, social stories are now a major autistic resource used to teach and encourage social and communication skills in ASD children and adults

The social skills story follows a set formula of four sentence types. 

Social stories for ASD are used in situations and skills the ASD individual finds difficult to cope with, they can be edited and adapted easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the ASD individual.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on.

Teachers can use social stories for ASD in the classroom, on the playground, out and about and for other tasks like personal hygiene etc

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are “visual thinkers and learners” meaning they think in images and pictures, therefore they are more able to absorb information and instruction when the information is visual rather than written text or auditory.

Social stories are visual strategies which describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses.

The social skills story is used to help with communication difficulties, changes to routines, explain rules and show how other people may be feeling by explaining another’s point of view. The social skills story will also show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social stories for ASD for your child with ASD can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

Monday, October 18th, 2010

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are designed and written following a set pattern of sentence types and visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate social cues.

A social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

Generally autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Consequently, an appropriate social skills story should be visual, the vast majority of autistic individuals respond better to visual information and instruction.

Social skills stories are visual strategies using images and appropriate first person text. Each social skills story should be written from the ASD individual’s point of view.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where. when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story acts like a role model showing autistic individuals visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide ASD individual’s with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the autistic person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare the autistic person for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories are visual strategies that address communication difficulties and provide a visual framework or plan which reduces stress and anxiety as well as giving the ASD individual a chance to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations, simply because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them.

Many individuals with autism fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may have different opinions, wants and needs to them.

Consequently communication difficulties are common for an ASD individual and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing.

Social skills stories help people with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories? And how people with autism can benefit from using these visual strategies to help them address communication difficulties as well as social skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social story on hygiene and Autism

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential everyday life skill.

 

However for a person with autism spectrum disorder even the simplest of hygiene tasks such as tooth brushing can cause anxiety and distress. For a person with autism spectrum disorder social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common.

 

Generally people with autism have sensory processing issues; are either hyper or hypo sensitive to stimuli – sight, sound, touch, taste or smell. Making a task such as tooth brushing problematic; the cold water, taste of the tooth paste even the nylon bristle of the tooth brush can be distressing.

 

Also a lack of social skills deficits affects how the autistic individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to sensory stimuli and those around them. So for example looking a hygiene and autism, it is not uncommon for an autistic individual to simply not understand the need for hygiene and self care.

 

Generally people with autism live in a ‘literal world’ meaning they fail to see the social rules or etiquette, they will speak literally and really not care much what others may be thinking or feeling, this is not arrogance merely a symptom of autism.

 

Generally, people with autism spectrum disorder lack social and communication skills and need direct teaching. Most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures.

 

Therefore visual strategies like social stories work very well for teaching and encouraging social skills the person with ASD is struggling to master or understand.

 

Consequently, using a social story on hygiene and Autism is beneficial. The social story will help the person with ASD understand the basic need for hygiene and how this is accomplished.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and reactions of others, helping to reduce stress and anxieties.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism can tackle teaching the need for hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist, showering, puberty and so on.

 

Using visual strategies has been shown to work; social stories use first person text and visual images much like a comic strip, as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behavior being tackled, in a manner the ASD individual will understand.

 

Social stories for autism should be editable, printable and easy to implement, need no formal training to use and easy to personalize for each ASD individual.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism will help explain visually the need for hygiene, why and how.

 

To learn more about visual strategies like social stories for autism and hygiene visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For other social stories for autism and hygiene as well as other issues visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Encourage good hygiene in autism

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Learning self-help skills such as good eating habits, dressing, toileting, and personal hygiene can be challenging for young people with autism spectrum disorder.


Social skills stories can be used effectively to help explain good hygiene habits and routines in autism. Social skills stories are developed to help individuals with autism understand how others perceive their appearance and the social implications of neglecting personal hygiene.


By using visual images and first person text in a step-by-step framework or plan the social story can explain exactly what individuals with autism need to remember to ensure good hygiene.

 

Teaching personal hygiene to young people with autism spectrum disorder can be problematic due to social skills deficits. Individuals with ASD may not understand the need to develop good hygiene habits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism and affect the way an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to situations , skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted or as “normal”


Social stories encourage good hygiene in autism by answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others.


Individuals with ASD are generally visual thinkers and learners therefore visual strategies such as social stories are beneficial. The social story should be editable, easy to personalize and print and be convenient to use.


Personal hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, showering and menstruation can be addressed using appropriate social stories for autism hygiene habits.


To learn more about how social stories for autism hygiene habits can be implemented to help ASD individuals with personal hygiene skills and routines visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Social stories short pieces of text, visual strategies which show ASD individuals how to cope with situations, skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand or deal with.


Social stories for autism hygiene habits can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Other social stories can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social skills story on hygiene and autism

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Social skills stories are visual strategies that ARE used to help teach social skills to people with autism. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories follow a set formula of sentence type.

 

Generally written in the first person and from the point of view of the autistic person social stories address social skills deficits and teach social and communication skills. A social skills story should be visually rich, the social skills story will describe the skill or behavior the autistic child may be struggling to understand in an easy to follow step by step plan or framework with visual images.

 

Generally children with autism have social difficulties and fail to understand social and communication skills. Skills and behaviors which the rest of us take for granted; for example hygiene skills such as eating habits, washing their teeth, getting a hair cut and so on.

 

Consequently, a lot of parents of autistic children, care givers and educators implement social skills stories to help the autistic child comprehend and master the skill or behavior they are struggling with, easing anxieties and stress.

 

The vast majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Social stories are excellent visual strategies, providing the answer to the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.

 

The social skills story can act like a role model for the ASD child.

 

By breaking the skill down into smaller easier to understand sections the social skills story will explain the skill in a manner the ASD child can understand.

 

Skills such as hygiene can cause an ASD child difficulties, many autistic children can be distressed by for example the sound the toilet makes, the taste of the toothpaste, visiting a dentist even getting a haircut can be stressful.

 

A social story on hygiene and autism, which can teach the appropriate hygiene skills, can ease stresses and anxieties.

 

To understand more about social skills stories for autism and how easy they can be implemented and used visit any of the following sites. Or for a specific social story on hygiene and autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For all other social skills stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Halloween and autism

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Halloween is probably one of the best holidays for most children. They can dress up as their favourite spooky character or superhero, and parade around the streets. On Halloween kids are allowed to go to strangers houses and ask for candy, the very thing kids are told not to do every other day of the year.


However for a lot of kids with autism, Halloween can be a stressful and confusing time.

 

Most kids with autism have social skills deficits. Social skills deficits are nearly always present in autistic children, having social skills deficits affects the way a person processes information, thinks, act, re-acts and behaves.


Due to their social limitations children on the spectrum will quite often fail to understand the concept of Halloween or make-believe. A lot of children on the spectrum will also have sensor processing issues: sight, sound, feel, touch and taste, which can mean getting your child with ASD to wear a costume, can be difficult, rough fabric and constricting accessories or masks is a recipe for disaster.


Getting an child with ASD to approach a strangers home, much less to greet them with any sort of social appropriateness, plus asking your child to hand over the candy he has just earned because he has diet limitations is sure to cause problems.


Social skills stories can help overcome many of the issues you may have surrounding this holiday.


Plan ahead work out a route, a leaving and returning time, scout around the area beforehand to check out for flashing lights and other sensory nightmares for your child on the spectrum and avoid these houses.


Practise the “Trick or Treat” question and accepting candy, use social stories for autism and Halloween to help with this.


Social stories are short visual strategies that are used to help children with autism deal with and cope with situations or skills they would otherwise struggle to understand, such as Halloween. A social skills story allows children with autism to rehearse a social situation, making it more routine, thus reducing anxieties and stress.


Using visual strategies such as social skills stories is recommended in autism as most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures.

Halloween and autism need not be a nightmare if you plan ahead, download social stories for autism and Halloween. Mark Halloween off on your calendar so your ASD child can see when it is going to happen, plan the costume, or maybe your ASD child would rather just a hat?


For more information on Halloween and autism and to download suitable social skills stories, which can be printed off and edited to make them personal to your ASD child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween


For all other stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Social skills stories for students with autism

Monday, October 4th, 2010

A social skills story is an intervention strategy used to teach social skills to individuals with autism.

 

Social skills stories were developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray, originally as a means of communication with the autistic students she was working with. Since then social skills stories have grown in popularity and use.

 

Today social skills stories are probably one of the most significant autism tools used to help individuals with autism cope and learn appropriate social, communication and behaviour skills.

 

Unlike typically developing children autistic kids do not develop social and communication skills in the typical manner, they prefer routines and need structure, finding changes difficult, stressful and confusing.

 

Generally autistic kids ARE visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures. Therefore the best learning method for the vast majority of students with autism is visual.

 

Using visual strategies like social skills stories is a popular answer with many teachers of students with autism.

 

A social skills story provides concrete information to help improve students’ social skills and appropriate behaviours. Normally social stories will follow a set pattern or formula of specific sentence type.

 

No two autistic students will ever be the same therefore social stories need to be editable to suit the needs and terminology used by individual autistic students.

 

A social skills story is an easy and effective way to teach students with autism how to negotiate changes to routines, handle problem situations and surprises. The social skills story will also help with situations such as transition, recess, making friends, asking questions, eating habits and personal hygiene.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism should be written from the autistic student’s point of view and use visual images to depict the situation or skill the student with ASD is struggling with.

 

Social stories should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social story should break the skill or situation down into small easier to understand sections, the important social cues and use no frill or extra language to complicate or detract from the skill or situation being dealt with in the social story.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism are visual strategies and should be printable for ease of use and convenience.

 

This visual strategy should also be easy to personalize and act as a role model or visual framework for the student with ASD.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories can help your ASD student visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Where you will find social skills stories for students with autism in key stage one, key stage two and also for preschool autism.

 

All these social stories are printable, editable and can be personalized for any student with ASD.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources