Posts Tagged ‘using social stories’

Visual method to teach social skills to children with autism

Monday, October 9th, 2017

A child with Autism will not set out intentionally to misbehave or cause stress or upset to anyone, simply out of fun or mischief.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.

 

The common characteristics of autism will often make the child appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.

 

Using a visual method to teach social skills to children with autism is useful. Research suggests an improvement in social behaviour can be seen when social stories are introduced.

 

Using social stories can improve communication issues and help the child with Autism understand behaviours like pretend play, and making friends. Social stories are short descriptive narratives like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.

 

They use images to help show what is happening and what is expected of them. Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how to use this visual method to teach social skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Using social stories to teach social skills to kids with ASD

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

Commonly children on the autism spectrum HAVE difficulties WITH AND IN social situations.

The social awareness skills we take for granted – the ability to “read” peoples body and facial expression ARE NOT skills that children on the autism spectrum learn naturally.

A lack of social awareness skills makes it difficult for these children to make and keep friends and can lead to social isolation.

However, using social stories to teach social skills to kids with ASD has proven effective. The social story is typically visual, and as we know the majority of children on the autism spectrum are indeed visual thinkers and learners.

Therefore this type of teaching aid is going to work and give better results.

The social skills story can be adapted to suit all ages and abilities and there is NO formal training needed to be able to use this autism resource.

Introducing social stories

Typically using social stories to teach social skills to kids with ASD is beneficial in all area of social awareness skills teaching for example: making friends, sharing, calming down, Visiting the Dentist and so on…

·         The social story uses first person text and visual images to describe the skill or situation from the child’s own perspective

·         The social story breaks the situation/skill down into smaller easier to understand sections

·         The social skills story acts like a visual plan or framework

·         The social skills story answers the “wh” questions – who, what. why, when and where

·         The social story also explains “HOW”

·         Social stories should aim to also give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others

·         Social stories should offer possible outcomes

For the vast majority of kids with autis,  social awareness skills ARE very difficult to learn and direct teaching is generally needed, this is what the social skills story WILL DO!

Parents and teachers report success in teaching social awareness skills and a drop in communication difficulties once social skills stories have been introduced.

To learn more about how social stories work and gain immediate access to 100 social skills stories downloads visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/stories.html

Teaching social skills for children with autism

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

There are various tools that can be used to teach social skills for children with autism, probably one of the most significant of these is the social skills story.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories

Social stories are used as a tool for aiding communication and teaching social skills. The social skills story is typically written in first person text, always from the point of view of the autistic child, and will use images to help describe the skill or behaviour in terms of relevant social cues.

The social skills story will provide accurate information, with no hidden extras. Social stories for children with autism answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

The characteristics of autism

A lack of appropriate social skills is one of the characteristics of autism. Many parents struggle daily to teach “everyday” life skills such as appropriate hygiene as well as other skills like making friends and social awareness skills to their autistic child.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories is beneficial. The social skills story acts like a visual framework or visual plan of the skill, helping the child to understand what is happening, why and what is expected of them.

Download: social stories for autism

While many sites offer downloads of social stories for autism, they may not always be colourful, editable and easy to implement.

At http://www.autismsocialstories.com you will not only find downloads of 100’s of well written social stories, the social stories are also colourful, editable, convenient and easy to implement.

To learn more about social stories for autism and how they can benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Using social stories with autistic child

Wednesday, November 10th, 2010

For children with an autism spectrum social interaction are difficult.  This is because children with an autism spectrum lack the theory of mind, which means they have marked difficulties with three main areas of development: social, communication both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills

 

A common strategy used to help children with an autism spectrum deal with a lack of the theory of mind is social skills stories.


What are social stories?


Social stories are used to explain much like a comic script story a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling with.

 

Developed by Carol Gray round twenty years ago to help with communication difficulties, social stories are now one of the major tools used to aid autistic children with social and communication skills.

 

Social skills stories have many uses not just learning how to interact in social situations. Social skills stories are also used to help with new routines, events, transitions, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger and frustration.

 

Research does show that social stories are a good method for improving the social behaviours of autistic children.

 

Many children with an autism spectrum have problems with communication, for example: answering questions, holding a conversation, listening etc.

 

A social skills story is written to help a child on the spectrum address a particular problem. However the social skills story can be used generally to address other issues as well. For example a social skills story for washing your hands can be used in the home as well as at school; not calling out is good in the classroom as well as other areas of school like assembly, with a bit of tweaking the social skills story is adaptable.

 

Probably one of the hardest social deficits for the peers or family of an autistic child is social indifference, where the autistic child appears not to care for the feelings of others, social stories are an excellent way of addressing this issue.

Good social stories will provide information about the feelings of others and the consequences of ignoring those feelings.

Social awkwardness is often the result of simply not understanding the expectations that a certain social situation includes. Providing information about those expectations helps address that deficit.

Social stories are written in first person text, for example “Today I am going to dentist” Social skills stories use images to show the skill like a role model or visual plan, in a manner the child with autism will understand.

However no two children are ever the same and most social stories will need slight tweaking to incorporate personal details, language etc.

 

To learn more about using social stories with an autistic child and how social skills stories are implemented visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories need no formal training to use, can be printed for convenience, are editable normally include visual images or pictures and will follow a set formula of sentence type in a concise manner that a child with autism can understand.

 

Research shows using social stories with an autistic child is beneficial and can have a positive affect of social, communication, imagination and behaviours.

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Autistic behaviour issues using social stories

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Children with an autistic spectrum disorder can have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age and ability.

 

The autism spectrum is an umbrella for a range of autistic disorders from low functioning autism to High functioning autism and Asperger disorder.

 

Although combined by autistic characteristics the abilities of each individual will vary depending on where a child falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Many of the symptoms associated with autistic spectrum disorder can lead to behavioural difficulties.

 

Typically children with an autistic spectrum disorder will have difficulties socialising and communicating with others. For example typical autistic characteristics can include: displaying symptoms of withdrawal, the use of odd or inappropriate language, have unusual preoccupations, use repetitive stereotypical movements, have unusual routines, habits and behaviours.

 

Research suggests parents, teachers and other professionals use social skills stories to improve the social functioning and behaviour of children with autism.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that describe skills and situations in terms of social cues and appropriate responses.

 

Social skills stories can be individualized to suit the needs and abilities of the individual on the spectrum. The social skills story can be used to help children with autism learn appropriate social and communication skills.

 

The goal of the social skills story for children with autism should be to help pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.

 

To learn more about how to help autistic behaviour issues using social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com.behavior

 

These social stories are visual strategies written in first person language from the point of view of the autistic individual and will help solve to solve autistic behaviour issues using social stories as the answer.

Other appropriate social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Treatment for autism

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder, and as yet there is still no known cure for autism, however there are many treatments.

 

Some help manage the symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder, while others address the social, behavioural and communication difficulties associated with this pervasive developmental disorder. Of all the available autism treatments any claiming to be a cure for autism is simply not so.

 

There are many different theories surrounding the “cause of autism” and as yet no one theory has proven conclusive, research into the cause of autism and the symptoms of autism is still on-going.

 

There are many different types of therapies and autism treatments developed specifically to alleviate symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world, with the available therapies and treatment for autism it is expected that children with autism have the opportunity to reach his or her full potential.

 

Probably one of the most significant treatment for autism is social stories, a social story will address communication difficulties help build social skills, interaction and imagination skills as well as encourage appropriate behaviours.

 

We all need a certain amount of social and communication skills to be able to function daily. With autism the ability to learn social and communication skills is missing, however using a treatment for autism like social stories this lack of naturally learnt skills and behaviours can be addressed successfully.


Typically developing children learn through the environment and their family and peers, the child with ASD wont, therefore direct teaching is necessary.  Using social stories as a strategy for improving and teaching social skills to your child with ASD is simple, no qualifications or formal training is needed, social stories are simple to use and very effective.

 

The symptoms of autism vary between individuals, however all autistic’s tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Therefore social stories were developed to be visual, much like a visual framework of the skill or behaviour being addressed.

 

For many parents probably the most significant difficulty they struggle with is their child’s communication difficulties, for most children with autism language is confusing and often they do not understand what is expected of them. Much like if you were dropped in a foreign country, chances are you would not understand what people were saying, however if they showed you a picture chances are you would catch on pretty fast. This is the same with autism visual images and pictures trigger understanding much quicker that the spoken or written word.

 

 

For example a parent struggling to make their child understand may talk more trying to explain, this is not going to work with a child with ASD, the answer is to talk less and use visual cues prompts. For example show them a picture of the toilet, dinner etc rather than speak they will understand a lot quicker and with less stress for the both of you.

 

Using social stories as a strategy uses this knowledge; a social story is a visual representation with minimal text, always in first person language that describes the skill or behaviour from the point of view of the autistic individual.

 

The social story breaks the situation down into small pieces and each piece of the skill for example going to recess is represented by an image and text describing the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) as well as what the child with ASD may expect from others and what they will expect back from them. This will help the autistic individual feel more comfortable and in control which will reduce anxieties and stress.

 

To learn more about this treatment for autism and how using social stories as a strategy can help your child with ASD visit any of the following sites:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Encouraging positive behaviour using social stories

Monday, April 19th, 2010

Social stories can be used as a tool for encouraging positive behaviours in children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Using social stories as a strategy does not need any formal training, parents, care givers, teachers, teacher’s assistants and so on can use social stories effectively as a means of encouraging positive behaviours as well as helping to improve social and communication skills.

 

Research suggests that social stories are a major proactive behaviour intervention that provides a positive approach in encouraging appropriate social behaviours.

 

A social story is a short story written in first person language from the ASD individual’s point of view.

 

We know that children with ASD tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Consequently, the social story was designed to encompass this. Developed twenty years ago as a means of communication, the social story has now evolved into a major intervention strategy in autism.

 

Studies show encouraging positive behaviour using social stories has proven very effective and their use has grown dramatically over the last twenty years.

 

Research also suggests that social stories have been proven to reduce inappropriate behaviours, for example tantrums, inappropriate vocalizations, as well as reduce social isolation.

 

Encouraging positive behaviour using social stories is also beneficial in helping children with ASD understand and learn skills such as sharing, making friends, taking turn, respecting personal space and so on.

 

Social stories are beneficial for all individuals with autism spectrum disorder, and are available from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories are user friendly, easy to implement and require no formal training to use. Using visual images and accurate no frill text a social story is much like a visual framework of the skill or behaviour that the ASD individual’s struggling to master, understand, cope with or that needs encouraging.

 

Social stories are available over the internet, written by experts that can be downloaded, printed and edited to suit all children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/school