Printable social stories for kids with autism

Autistic children tend to prefer structure and routine, and can become stressed and anxious when things change.

Generally most autistic children are visual thinkers; Which means they think in pictures or images, and language is secondary.

Therefore when speaking try and make sentences short and precise do not give lengthy explanations and try to use visual images, graphs or pictures to help with your explanation or lesson. This way the child on the spectrum will be far more likely to understand what it is you’re trying to put across or say.

Another thing to remember is not to string a long list of instructions together a child on the spectrum may have problems remembering this.

The thing to remember here is that autistic children are visual thinkers and a long verbal list will be easily forgotten. Break the list up into smaller more easily managed chunks and wherever possible add visual clues, like pictures and images this is easier to remember.

So for example when teaching a child on the spectrum about feelings, parents, teachers and care givers can achieve far better results by using visual strategies such as printable social stories for kids with autism.

Typically developing children can read facial expression and body language and are able to interpret thoughts, feelings, emotions and language that the child on the spectrum can not. Having autism will affect the way the child processes information, thinks and acts this is called social impairments.

Autistic children have social impairments and will not be able to understand facial expressions, body language and communication both verbal and non-verbal. A child with autism will speak literally and say exactly what they mean or see, so don’t be offended by their sometimes abrupt and seemingly rude observations at times.

Using printable autism social stories for kids with autism is a good mean’s of explaining feelings to  a child with autism, by giving them visual cues on what is expected from them, and what they can expect in certain situations.

For example “nick names” children with autism may have difficulties understanding why we have pet names for each other, or why their friends may call each other odd names! Printable autism social stories for kids with autism can act as means of explaining this a bit like a role model, helping the autistic child understand why people use nick names.

There are many different social situations and tasks a normally developing child will accomplish easily.

But for children with autism can be stressful and cause anxiety, this is where social stories can help by explaining the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “how” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others all helping the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable. Social stories are intervention strategies that are generally visual, written in first person text and always from the point of view of the autistic child.

Social stories can be used for transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, coping with hygiene issues and helping to pave the way to positive behaviours.

A good source of autism social stories is

www.autismsocialstories.com For a wide variety of issues, including: Making friends, having a conversation, asking questions, autism and going to the bathroom and many more!

Or for more specific social stories, visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/pottywww.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories for kids with autism

Social stories are stories specifically written for kids with autism to help them deal with specific issues.  They are ideal for kids with autism because they can be read again and again, autistic kids prefer repetition.


The social skills story provides the autistic child with accurate information in an easy to understand manner.


The skill or situation is broken down in to key points; the important social cues, and answers the key “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the  reactions the autistic child might expect to occur in the situation, the actions and reactions that might be expected of him, and why.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can be used for many situations and skills the child is struggling with; for example: answering questions, making friends, respecting personal space, even situations such as visiting Grandparents and the dentist, infact anything!

 

The objective being to increase the child’s understanding of, make him more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation they are having problems with.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can act like a visual planner, because they are visually rich with images or pictures they are easy to follow. Social skills stories are always written in first person text and from the ASD child’s point of view.

 

East to edit and personalize social skills stories are convenient and can be used in all situations including school and at home. Parents are able to edit the stories and add language that the ASD child’s familiar with.

 

The social skills story is printable therefore it can be easily transported. Acting like a role model a social skills story can answer tricky questions around puberty, on special occasions, about hygiene issues and so on.

 

Research suggests kids with autism respond extremely well to social skills stories.

 

For more info on how to use social skills stories and to gain access to downloads of these autistic resources visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Or for more other autistic resources http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories for kids with autism

Unlike typically developing children, kids with autism spectrum disorder do not naturally learn social or communication skills.  As typically developing individuals we learn and use verbal and non-verbal communication automatically, we use expression and body language to convey information sometimes without even realizing we are doing so.

 

Using facial expressions and body language we can portray love, happiness, sadness, contentment and fear.

 

Without social and communication skills we would be left confused and inevitably social mistakes and blunders would be the norm. Our interpretations of how or what others are thinking or feeling gives us the ability and knowledge to read what comes next, this ability is missing in autism.

 

Generally for kids with autism spectrum disorder the world is confusing, and with a lack of social and communication skills their ability to be understood or communicate can be hindered and often confused.

 

Unlike their typically developing peers the autistic child finds it difficult to read situations or interpret expression and non verbal communications. For kids with autism social prompts are easily missed or mistaken, their ability to understand behaviors such as sharing, taking turns even making friends is impaired and in some cases completely missing.

 

Therefore parents, care givers, teachers and other people involved with the care of kids with autism find great relief in autistic visual supports that can help them to teach the autistic child social and communication skills effectively.


Autistic visual supports such as social stories for kids with autism were developed around twenty years ago to help re-enforce and teach social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The images and pictures used in social stories for kids with autism are powerful re-enforcers, and as such are probably the most significant resource used for teaching appropriate social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Autistic visual supports such as social skills stories for kids with autism provide visual cues and representations along with appropriate text. The social skills stories for kids with autism also provide support and understanding using appropriate language, written in first person text from the autistic person’s point of view. Social stories use a specific defined formula.

 

Research shows us significant numbers of autistic children benefit from the implementation of social skills stories for kids with autism and therefore many teachers, parents and other professionals now rely on these autistic visual supports to help them teach and re-enforce social and communication skills.

 

 

To get more information on autistic visual supports and download social skills stories visit any of the following site:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

Life after a diagnosis of autism

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world; autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders today with 1 in every 150 children receiving a diagnosis of autism.

 

Scientists still have no cure for autism, but strive to find answers to the burning questions what is autism and how is it cured?

 

So as we know it what is autism and how do we cope and move forward with life after a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder? Autism spectrum disorder is a complex set of autism symptoms or characteristics all pertaining to the way a child develops (brain) the autism symptoms or characteristics affect the way a child develops in the triad of autistic impairments.

 

Put simply the triad of autistic impairments are deficits in the way the autism child develops skills and behaviors their social, communication, imagination and interaction skills will be poor and not develop in the normal way.


For typically developing children these skills develop naturally without us needing to really put much thought and effort into their development, for example typically developing children will be naturally inquisitive, will want physical contact, can make eye contact, will quickly learn to point, will crawl, stand, play, and want the interaction of peers and family members.

 

For the autism child these natural skills need to be encouraged and will need direct teaching.

 

Although there is no cure for autism there are treatments for autism that make the life of the autism child much easier and allow them to develop to their full potential. Autism spectrum disorder is not a mental disorder, but that said some kids with autism, those on the lower end of the autism spectrum scale may not develop speech or it may develop late and may display educational difficulties.

 

Generally those kids with autism on the higher end of the autism spectrum scale will be of average to above average intelligence and you may here them referred to as “the little professor” or “geeks”.

 

One of the major treatments for autism that can really help the autism child and parent is social stories. These can help bridge that gap and teach the social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors that the rest of us take for granted.

 

Since their development almost twenty years ago treatment for social skills deficits in autism has moved forward in huge leaps and bounds. Parents, teachers and all others involved in and child’s care can use social stories with the child to help connect and teach skills and behaviors the autism child may not understand or may find stressful.

 

The social stories can be used for all social skills deficits in autism from the very basic like mastering tooth brushing, wiping your nose, to the more complex like making friends, controlling behaviors, asking questions, being a good sport and so on they are very versatile, editable and usually visually rich following set guidelines and using appropriate text.

 

For many parents life after a diagnosis of autism can move forward significantly using social stories they can help their child feel more comfortable with skills, situations, events and behaviors their child is struggling with making family life tolerable and also life in school easier and less stressful for their child.

 

Generally all kids with autism respond well to social stories and huge success are normally reported for this excellent tool in the treatment for social skills deficits in autism.


To download and find out more about the benefits of social stories for kids with autism and how they help as a “significant” treatment for social skills deficits in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites are also good portals of social stories for kids with autism:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources