ASD approaches

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain; normally diagnosed in early childhood.

A diagnosis of ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is not the end of the world. The indicators of autism will vary between individuals, but generally kids with autism may display communication difficulties, and difficulties forming friendships with other people.

Kids with autism generally find it hard to make any sense of their environment. Often referred to as “Autism Own World”.

Research shows that in some kids with autism indicators may not present themselves until the child is between 1 -2 years of age.

What is autism? Here is a list of some of the possible indicators you may have noticed in your ASD child:

  • An ASD child may lack of the ability to direct others attention to what they want or need. Unlike a normally developing child, who will point or gesture towards the object in question.
  • Kids with autism rarely adjust their gaze to look at objects, and lack the inclination to look at something they are being directed towards.
  • An ASD child may have communication difficulties and find sustaining or beginning conversations difficult.
  • Sometimes kids with autism will be slow developing speech and sometimes speech may never actually begin.
  • They may engage in repetitive behaviours…for example repeating a TV commercial or rhyme etc.
  • They may confuse simple language terms, and use language in the wrong context, for example they may refer to themselves by name in a conversation or sentence, not by saying “I”; i.e. rather than saying “can I have a biscuit”, they may say “Ben wants a biscuit” and so on…
  • On occasions an autistic child may prefer to communicate by gesture rather than using speech.

Children with autism tend to prefer to be alone and find maintaining and indeed starting friendships with peers difficult. Children with autism and autistic people in general have difficulties in making eye contact which can make encounters difficult

An autistic child will struggle with interactive games and pretend play, failing to see what the point of the activity or game is.

 

 

Autism what is it? Understanding your ASD child and forming appropriate ASD approaches is very important and will make the difference in helping your autistic child reach his or her full potential

There are many ASD approaches to help kids with autism understand the world they live in…

One very effective way of accomplishing this is by the introduction of visual support tools such as autism social skills stories

Autism Spectrum Disorder is being diagnosed far more these days. Research into pervasive developmental disorder has suggested that using visual support tools such as autism social skills stories has impacted on the lives and families of those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder such as ASD
(Autism Spectrum Disorder)

ASD approaches such as autism social skills stories are used for all situations and activities the ASD child may be confused by or struggling with, for example: Going to the dentist, the death of a loved one, a new car, brushing their hair.

For immediate download of autism social skills stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com

Or alternatively visit any of the following sites for more information and social stories.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is probably one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Your child receiving a diagnosis of autism is probably going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will certainly have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” which are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Typically children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child the child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

 

Normally developing children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers etc. which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

As a general rule all parents, teachers, guardians, teachers and care givers use autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum.

 

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language always from the child’s point of view, using first person text and visually rich social stories for autism explain the why, what, where and when and how to the autism child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and obtain info and downloads of various social skills stories for autism

How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic deficits

What are Autistic Deficits?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

 

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Children on the autistic spectrum do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with children on the autistic spectrum.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autism child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after receiving a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children on the autistic spectrum learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, having autism and making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children on the autistic spectrum. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the child with ASD always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the child with ASD.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like having autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Autism Supports and Treatments

A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can come a s a great shock to many parents.

It is thought that an average of 1 in every 150 babies is going to be given a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder before they attend school, this number is astonishing. Research into autism suggests that there is no one reason for autism, and that there is no cure.

While there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, there are various autism supports and treatments available that can and will help with the symptoms of autism.

Autism supports and treatments can help  with disruptive behaviors, and teach self-help skills that allow for greater independence.  So what are the main symptoms of autism? social awareness deficits, communication difficulties both in verbal and non-verbal communication, imagination skills deficits as well as some stereotypical behaviours and sensory processing issues.

Autism supports and treatments ARE often reffered to as “Intervention Strategies”

Which Intervention Strategies will work for your child is mainy dependant on your child’s own personal abilities. No two children with autism spectrum disorder will ever be the same, and therefore the approach will be different. However one of the most significant treatments of autism is Social Skills Stories and ARE adaptable to suit all.

Social Skills Stories ARE used to help teach social awareness skills, deal with communication difficulties and help the child on the spectrum overcome many of the symptoms of autism that they display.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill or behaviour from the child’s own perspective, breaking the skill or behaviour down into small relevant chunks that the child on the spectrum can understand.

The social story looks much like a comic script with visual images and small pices of first person text. Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in pictures and will gain far more from visual intervention strategies like social  stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.

Commonly visual intervention strategies like the social story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will also provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum disorder.

To implement social skills stories for autism and to learn more about what autism supports and treatments are avauilable visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Alternatively you will find immediate download of socials stories for autism from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Teaching social skills for children with autism

There are various tools that can be used to teach social skills for children with autism, probably one of the most significant of these is the social skills story.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories

Social stories are used as a tool for aiding communication and teaching social skills. The social skills story is typically written in first person text, always from the point of view of the autistic child, and will use images to help describe the skill or behaviour in terms of relevant social cues.

The social skills story will provide accurate information, with no hidden extras. Social stories for children with autism answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

The characteristics of autism

A lack of appropriate social skills is one of the characteristics of autism. Many parents struggle daily to teach “everyday” life skills such as appropriate hygiene as well as other skills like making friends and social awareness skills to their autistic child.

Teaching social skills for children with autism using social stories is beneficial. The social skills story acts like a visual framework or visual plan of the skill, helping the child to understand what is happening, why and what is expected of them.

Download: social stories for autism

While many sites offer downloads of social stories for autism, they may not always be colourful, editable and easy to implement.

At http://www.autismsocialstories.com you will not only find downloads of 100’s of well written social stories, the social stories are also colourful, editable, convenient and easy to implement.

To learn more about social stories for autism and how they can benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

After a diagnosis of autism

Autism is probably one of the most frequent developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born getting a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be testing to accept, the autism child will undoubtedly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically budding children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The autistic child lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents describe after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their autistic child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Children with ASD need social skills

Research indicates that social impairments ARE a common symptom of autism, and that all individuals with autism will have social impairments of varying degrees dependant on their own personal level of ability.

 

Commonly, all children with ASD struggle with social skills and need direct teaching using Intervention Strategies designed specifically for this.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills and behaviours naturally through watching and copying their peers and parents and directly from their environment etc.

 

Children with ASD need social skills teaching; they will not naturally mimic or interpret and learn social or communication skills. A child with an ASD will have difficulties following instruction unless the instruction or information is presented in a manner which they can readily understand.

 

We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are in-fact VISUAL THINKERS AND LEARNERS. This means that they think in pictures a bit like a movie script playing, and will not easily understand information that is written or spoken.

 

Consequently, appropriate Intervention Strategies ARE needed which ARE visual, such as PECS, Flash cards and social stories.

 

Unlike typically developing children a child with an ASD will not readily accept changes or transition and can become stressed and overwhelmed by tasks, skills and activities the rest of us think of as “everyday” or “normal”, like for example brushing your teeth, visiting a dentist, getting a haircut, recess, respecting personal space, making friends and so on.

 

Social Stories ARE perfect Intervention Strategies which were first introduced by therapist Carol Gray twenty years ago to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with. Today Social Stories ARE used not only to HELP autistic children master communication skills both verbal and non-verbal but also to HELP children on the spectrum learn new skills, cope with changes to routines, transitions and encourage positive behaviours.

 

Social Stories USE visual images LIKE A VISUAL PLAN OR ROLE MODEL to describe a situation or skill in terms of relevant “social cues”, like a comic script conversation.

 

A social skills story is normally written in first person text and in a manner that children on the spectrum WILL BETTER understand.

 

Social stories break the skill down in to smaller sections the relevant “social cues” removing the fluff and un-necessary language, in a set formula of 4 main sentence types: Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and Control sentences.

 

Intervention Strategies such as a social skills story should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of those around them, which WILL HELP to reduce stress and confusion.

 

For example a social skills story written to help explain the need to brush your teeth would explain visually and with first person relevant text the “wh” questions why and how as well as what the consequence of not brushing would be – tooth ache etc. This story may start something like this:

 

It is important that I brush my teeth twice a day, I can brush them every morning and before I go to bed at night. 

AND SO ON…

To learn more about HOW YOU CAN HELP Children with ASD need social skills teaching USING methods like social stories visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene