Wonderful Craft Ideas to share with your child on the Autism Spectrum

child with autism,wonderful craft ideas to share with your child on the Autism Spectrum,child on the Autism Spectrum,Kids with autismPlay is a necessary part of growing up for most children, but unlike a typically developing child the child with autism will almost certainly have issues with pretend play.

However, craft can be more structured, there are rules to follow and it is not necessarily all left to the imagination and for a child on the Autism Spectrum this can be helpful.

Therefore, wonderful craft ideas to share with your child on the Autism Spectrum can help you to interact with your child and have fun together. No two children are the same and what holds the attention of one child might not hold the attention of another, so with this amazing fun filled craft book there is something for everyone.

Kids with autism are typically quite sensitive to sensory stimulation. So activities such as running, spinning and twirling can be quite good fun for them. Try creating activities based around movement for example bouncing on a trampoline (inside and out). Or try swinging on a swing, in a hammock or try using a blanket to swing your child.

Many kids with autism like to build things for example using Lego. You may also find putting a puzzle together is quite good fun with your child.

Other Wonderful Craft Ideas to share with your Child on the Autism Spectrum can be viewed at: Craft Ideas to share

Typically children on the autism spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and will find visual activities, information and projects more interesting. This applies to learning social awareness and communication skills as well.

A child with autism WILL gain better understanding of what to do in a situation if they are shown visually. Therefore visual teaching methods and tools, have been proven to be successful. For example a child with autism that is sensitive to sensory stimulation may find social stories useful when it comes to situations like hair washing, brushing their teeth, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist and so on…

Such social stories for teaching hygiene habits can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene.html

There is also for immediate download 33 wonderful craft Ideas for you to share with your Child on the Autism Spectrum including:
• There Candy Crafts
• Dried Flowers
• Making Gifts
• How to make a scarecrow
• How to make homemade ice cream
• How to make homemade stickers
• Making handmade paper
• Making homemade potpurri
• Making jewellery
• Sea shell crafts
• Trash Art
Ready for immediate download as well as other tools for autism such as social stories, visual social story cards, picture communication cards, now and next boards, visual schedules, behaviour charts and more…

Visit for social stories: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Teaching a child with ASD play skills

Kids with autism find play skills and social interaction with peers extremely difficult. 

 

This is due to their social skills deficits, which are common to all individuals with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), the degree of social skills deficits will depend on each individual, no two children will ever be the same.

 

A child on the autism range will undoubtedly have social skills deficits in three main areas of development, social interactions, communication both verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills.

 

Because of the child’s rigidity of thought and behaviour, and limited imagination or imaginative play skills, the child on the autism range may carry out ritualistic actions. For example lining up their Lego or sorting it into colours rather than playing with it.

 

A child on the autism range may focus upon minor details, for example rather than play with the toy car they may be obsessed with the wheel only and continuously spin it, rather than play with the whole car.

 

Plus with limited verbal and non-verbal communication skills the child with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will lack the ability to converse naturally and may misunderstand the emotions, gestures, or ideas of others, and have difficulties understanding wit, humour and pretend play talk.

 

Kids with autism tend to be very literal, making pretend or imaginative play difficult for them to join in with or understand.

 

However there are techniques available that help build and promote play skills in children with autism.

 

One such technique is the use of social skills stories these can be adapted to suit individual’s needs, can be printed and used almost everywhere making them ideal in the home, school and out and about.

 

Consequently teaching a child with ASD play skills can be initiated using social skills stories as a means of showing the child with ASD how and why we play. By answering the “wh” questions: who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. The social skills story acts like a role model or visual plan when teaching a child with ASD play skills by detailing the skill and breaking it down into small pieces.

 

Using visual images and first person text the social skills story can help the child with ASD better understand the skill or behaviour, therefore making them more comfortable with and in the situation, reducing stress and un-necessary anxiety.

 

To find appropriate social skills stories that help teach play skills as well as other social and communication skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

ASD approaches

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain; normally diagnosed in early childhood.

A diagnosis of ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is not the end of the world. The indicators of autism will vary between individuals, but generally kids with autism may display communication difficulties, and difficulties forming friendships with other people.

Kids with autism generally find it hard to make any sense of their environment. Often referred to as “Autism Own World”.

Research shows that in some kids with autism indicators may not present themselves until the child is between 1 -2 years of age.

What is autism? Here is a list of some of the possible indicators you may have noticed in your ASD child:

  • An ASD child may lack of the ability to direct others attention to what they want or need. Unlike a normally developing child, who will point or gesture towards the object in question.
  • Kids with autism rarely adjust their gaze to look at objects, and lack the inclination to look at something they are being directed towards.
  • An ASD child may have communication difficulties and find sustaining or beginning conversations difficult.
  • Sometimes kids with autism will be slow developing speech and sometimes speech may never actually begin.
  • They may engage in repetitive behaviours…for example repeating a TV commercial or rhyme etc.
  • They may confuse simple language terms, and use language in the wrong context, for example they may refer to themselves by name in a conversation or sentence, not by saying “I”; i.e. rather than saying “can I have a biscuit”, they may say “Ben wants a biscuit” and so on…
  • On occasions an autistic child may prefer to communicate by gesture rather than using speech.

Children with autism tend to prefer to be alone and find maintaining and indeed starting friendships with peers difficult. Children with autism and autistic people in general have difficulties in making eye contact which can make encounters difficult

An autistic child will struggle with interactive games and pretend play, failing to see what the point of the activity or game is.

 

 

Autism what is it? Understanding your ASD child and forming appropriate ASD approaches is very important and will make the difference in helping your autistic child reach his or her full potential

There are many ASD approaches to help kids with autism understand the world they live in…

One very effective way of accomplishing this is by the introduction of visual support tools such as autism social skills stories

Autism Spectrum Disorder is being diagnosed far more these days. Research into pervasive developmental disorder has suggested that using visual support tools such as autism social skills stories has impacted on the lives and families of those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder such as ASD
(Autism Spectrum Disorder)

ASD approaches such as autism social skills stories are used for all situations and activities the ASD child may be confused by or struggling with, for example: Going to the dentist, the death of a loved one, a new car, brushing their hair.

For immediate download of autism social skills stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com

Or alternatively visit any of the following sites for more information and social stories.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

Tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social deficiencies these are common to autism; it is due to these social deficiencies that the autistic child may be unaware of the rules of social conduct, how to act in public or interactions. Even though all autistic individuals have social deficiencies the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

Having social deficiencies is common to autism and at times can leave the autistic child open to bullying especially at school.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language can also cause problems.

 

Generally kids with autism that display communication difficulties will misunderstand simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally. For example; metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “watch what you say”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to their social deficiencies sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However using treatments of autism for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be beneficial.

 

There are many treatments of autism available with social skills stories being probably the most significant for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are used effectively by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to help improve and teach social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours as well as addressing communication difficulties, in children with autism.

 

Social skills stories are treatments of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

Social skills stories help overcome social deficiencies by tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, by helping the child with autism learn appropriate social skills and behaviours.

 

The autism social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan detailing the key points or goals, allowing them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with and less likely to become stressed or agitated.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social deficiencies these are familiar to autism; it is due to these social deficiencies that the autistic child may be unaware of the rules of social conduct, how to act in public or interactions. Even though all autistic individuals have social deficiencies the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

Having social deficiencies is familiar to autism and at times can leave the autistic child open to bullying especially at school.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language can also cause problems.

 

Generally kids with autism that display communication difficulties will misunderstand simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally. For example; metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “watch what you say”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to their social deficiencies sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However using management tactics of autism for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be beneficial.

 

There are many management tactics of autism available with social skills stories being probably the most significant for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are used effectively by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to help improve and teach social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours as well as addressing communication difficulties in children with autism.

 

Social skills stories are management tactics of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

Social skills stories help overcome social deficiencies by communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, by helping the child with autism learn appropriate social skills and behaviours.

 

The social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan detailing the key points or goals, allowing them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with and less likely to become stressed or agitated.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A. S. D. Social Skills Stories

A. S. D. social skills stories were first used around twenty years ago as a method for teaching and communicating with children on the spectrum.

They were developed to aid communication in both verbal and nonverbal kids with autism. The goal being that children on the spectrum were able to use the A. S. D. social skills stories as a tool to help them clarify and understand information and directions.

A. S. D. social skills stories provide the child with autism explanations and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing.

Used effectively as a tool to teach social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder the  social story uses visual cues to show the child with autism what is expected of them as well as what they can expect from others.

Kids with autism spectrum disorder have social skills impairments which make social and communication skills difficult to master.

ASD social stories therefore help to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder, visually almost like a comic strip script, the skill or behavior in terms of relative social cues and prompts making it easier for the child with autism to understand the “wh” question (who, where, When, what and why)

Research shows us that teaching social skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder is made easier when visual aids are used.  

Consequently, parents with autistic children and teachers use visual tools such as social skills stories for teaching social skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder. The social skills story is visually rich and is used much like a step by step visual plan detailing the skill being mastered.

Showing the child with autism visually possible outcomes, giving focus to the key points, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

The social skills story can also be used to help with routine changes, teaching skills and behaviors, explaining rules and so on…

ASD social stories use a specifically defined style and format. They are mainly written by experts in autism.

Many parents with autistic children, teachers as well as other professionals use social skills stories for autistic children to teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download A. S. D. social skills stories for autistic children on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autimsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismscoialstories.com/social_skills

 

Autism goals for interaction

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; this can affect how the person with autism spectrum thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

 

Autism impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Typically kids with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on Autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism spectrum disorder and social skills should be taught directly.

 

Generally kids with autism spectrum disorder rare visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; this is achievable using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism spectrum disorder overcome social interaction difficulties.

 

To find appropriate Autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween