Posts Tagged ‘hygiene in autism’

Using visual support to teach hygiene in autism

Friday, July 22nd, 2011

Unlike typically developing children a child on the spectrum WILL NOT naturally develop self-care skills, and WILL NEED direct teaching.

Typically individuals with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures and WILL respond better to teaching materials and strategies which ARE VISUAL.

Using visual support to teach hygiene in autism is essential in most instances, typically developing youngsters will people watch and pick up on self-care skills, but children with autism DO NOT people watch and in most instances WILL NOT naturally learn self-care skills. A good social skills story can HELP the child on the spectrum learn essential hygiene skills.

For most individuals with autism hygiene can be confusing and in some cases even a painful experience! This is due to social skills deficits and sensory processing difficulties.

Social skills deficits ARE present in ALL individuals with autism, but to varying degrees dependant on where the individual is on the autism spectrum scale.

Using visual support to teach hygiene in autism is beneficial. Visual supports such as “social skills stories” ARE USED to HELP children with autism understand and deal with situations or skills that they find difficult or confusing like: puberty, washing their teeth, visiting a dentist and so on.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and gives the young person with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of marked weakness in those on the spectrum.

Social skills stories will normally be written in first person text and is always written from the point of view of the young person with autism.

No two people on the spectrum are ever going to be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore the social skills story needs to be editable and easy to tweak.

To learn more about social stories for hygiene in autism and to see an example of social stories for hygiene in autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

Alternatively visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Encourage good hygiene in autism

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Learning self-help skills such as good eating habits, dressing, toileting, and personal hygiene can be challenging for young people with autism spectrum disorder.


Social skills stories can be used effectively to help explain good hygiene habits and routines in autism. Social skills stories are developed to help individuals with autism understand how others perceive their appearance and the social implications of neglecting personal hygiene.


By using visual images and first person text in a step-by-step framework or plan the social story can explain exactly what individuals with autism need to remember to ensure good hygiene.

 

Teaching personal hygiene to young people with autism spectrum disorder can be problematic due to social skills deficits. Individuals with ASD may not understand the need to develop good hygiene habits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism and affect the way an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to situations , skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted or as “normal”


Social stories encourage good hygiene in autism by answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others.


Individuals with ASD are generally visual thinkers and learners therefore visual strategies such as social stories are beneficial. The social story should be editable, easy to personalize and print and be convenient to use.


Personal hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, showering and menstruation can be addressed using appropriate social stories for autism hygiene habits.


To learn more about how social stories for autism hygiene habits can be implemented to help ASD individuals with personal hygiene skills and routines visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Social stories short pieces of text, visual strategies which show ASD individuals how to cope with situations, skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand or deal with.


Social stories for autism hygiene habits can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Other social stories can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

“Everyday”, “normal” hygiene routines for the majority of us come naturally. As typically developing individuals we have been programmed to watch, listen and learn from those around us and this is how we pick up on our hygiene routines.

 

For individuals on the spectrum this ability to watch, listen and learn is missing, autistic individuals are less likely to learn everyday, normal hygiene routines from watching others and in most cases will need direct teaching of these skills.

 

This can be done through the use of visual supports for autism and related conditions, we know autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, thus using visual supports for autism makes good sense. An individuals on the spectrum are far more likely to understand and follow a visual prompt than a written prompt or oral.

 

There are many visual support aids for autism available but probably the most significant of these are social skills stories. These were introduced around twenty years ago specifically for children with autism and related conditions, to help them communicate and understand skills and behaviours that they were struggling to master.

 

Deficits in social and communication skills are common to autism and using social skills stories has been proven affective. Many parents, teachers and other professionals use visual support aids for autism to help them teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours, for example hygiene routines like, brushing teeth, washing hair, getting a hair cut and so on.

 

Used correctly social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism are effective. You may download social stories from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Social stories are short, visual descriptive plans of a skill or behaviour, much like a comic strip. Social stories break the skill down into small visual steps, describing and showing the “wh” questions (who, where, what, when and why). Helping the individual with ASD understand what is expected of them, and in return what they can expect from others.

 

Making the individual with ASD feel more comfortable with and in the situation, which in turn can eliminate much of the stress and confusion they may be feeling.

 

Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism can be achieved. To download hygiene social stories for autism visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene for all other social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Remember hygiene social stories for autism can be immediately downloaded and implemented today to help overcome hygiene issues in children with autism, as well as teens.]

 

 

 

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Teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

Many parents of teenagers with autism worry that their child will not “fit in”. This worry is heightened by the autistic teenager’s difficulties in mastering hygiene skills and routines? especially around puberty.

Hygiene skills are essential life skills but for many autistic teens developing these skills can be challenging. Consequently direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is essential.

Many parents of teenagers with autism look for ways to teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism and turn increasingly towards autistic supports such as social skills stories.

 

Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories help teach social and communication skills to autistic individuals effectively.

 

Using appropriate language and visual representations they show the teen with autism exactly how to master a skill, what to expect and what others will expect.


The social skills stories explain the why, where, what and when of the skill concentrating on the main key points and cutting out all the frills in a way the teen with autism can comprehend and cope with, helping to relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Consequently many parents of teenagers with autism use social skills stories to teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism and report huge success rates.

 

Parents of autistic teens implement social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:


* autism and going to the bathroom

* puberty and autistic girls

* autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant

* autism and menstruation

* taking a shower

* taking a bath


Plus helping to teach many autistic hygiene issues, all relevant to a healthy lifestyle and being accepted by peers.

 

Generally parents of autistic teens will already probably have a general knowledge of social skills stories, and may already be using them to teach other social and communication skills to their autistic teenager.

 

To download social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers you can visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

From this website you can now instantly download 20 social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers and children.

 

Other social skills stories for autistic teenagers dealing with puberty and autistic girls, plus male puberty, school, friendships and other related issues are found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens