Posts Tagged ‘for autism’

What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Autism Spectrum Disorder is probably one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Your child receiving a diagnosis of autism is probably going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will certainly have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” which are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Typically children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child the child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

 

Normally developing children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers etc. which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

As a general rule all parents, teachers, guardians, teachers and care givers use autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum.

 

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language always from the child’s point of view, using first person text and visually rich social stories for autism explain the why, what, where and when and how to the autism child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and obtain info and downloads of various social skills stories for autism

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

 

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Children on the autistic spectrum do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with children on the autistic spectrum.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autism child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after receiving a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children on the autistic spectrum learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, having autism and making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children on the autistic spectrum. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the child with ASD always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the child with ASD.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like having autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Social Stories for people with Autism

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Social stories are short explanations of a specific behaviour, skill, situation, event or activity showing/detailing definite information about what to expect in that situation and why.

Social skills stories ARE treatments for autism which CAN be used for a wide variety of difficulties including:

Transitions

Making choices

Teaching self-help/hygiene skills

Preparing for changes to routines

Making and maintaining friendships

Dealing with skills/behaviours which cause stress and anxiety

Sudden changes/unexpected circumstances – such as a death, birth etc.

The social skills story will explain visually what is happening/about to happen and why, by breaking the skill/behaviour down into smaller relevant pieces, the “social cues”.

So for example the social skills story will aim to answer the important “wh” questions – what, where, why, when and who as well as “HOW” it will also attempt to give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of any other people affected or involved. Understanding the thoughts, feelings and emotions of other people is an area of considerable weakness for most people with autism spectrum disorder.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder tend to be predominantly visual thinkers and learners which indicates that treatments for autism the visual support tools, resources and information should be visual. It is therefore believed that visual support tools like social skills stories ARE generally the best form of teaching/support tool.

Social Stories for people with Autism can be downloaded and used with great affect from sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com. You will also find visual social story cards and folders as well as other visual support tools such as picture communication cards/flash cards, behaviour plans and charts as well as freebies and a comprehensive parent page.

Visit www.autismsocialstories.com

Enhancing social skills in autistic children

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

For the vast majority of autistic children social skills ARE either missing or NEED improving.

This is due to the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits, which ARE common to autism to varying degrees

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect how the child on the spectrum acts, re-acts, thinks and behaves.

Methods for enhancing social skills in autistic children ARE generally visual. This is because most children on the spectrum ARE visual learners and thinkers and will tend to use language secondary.

Visual supports for autism such as: social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards etc ARE visual supports which can be introduced simply and need NO formal training to use.

Characteristically children on the spectrum find visual supports for autism beneficial. Social skills stories ARE short descriptive visual supports which describe a skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story looks much like a comic script, using images/pictures and short precise pieces of text. The social story is always from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, using first person text in short sentences.

The social story answers the “wh” questions: who, what, Why, where, and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight wherever possible into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

Social skills stories CAN be used for a wide variety of situations or skills such as: asking questions, calming down, hygiene issues, self-help skills and so on…

For many children on the spectrum visual supports for autism ARE invaluable and can be treated like visual plans or frameworks to help them cope with and learn skills and behaviours which cause stress and anxiety.

To learn more about visual supports for autism like social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards as well as other visual supports visual http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Building autistic social skills

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Autism is a developmental disorder which has no known cure. That said THERE ARE plenty of excellent resources which can be used to help those diagnosed autistic.

Characteristically those diagnosed autistic WILL have social and communication difficulties, this is due to social skills deficits which ARE apparent in all people with autism but to varying degrees.

Typically people with autism WILL prefer visual information and teaching, it is therefore believed that resources and teaching styles should be more visual.

This is easily achieved through the use of visual resources for autism such as social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Using visual resources for autism is beneficial, and typically will need no formal training to implement and use.

For example social skills stories ARE visual resources for autism which ARE used specifically for building autistic social skills and helping to overcome communication and social awareness difficulties.

Having social skills deficits can be challenging for many children on the autism spectrum and can at times even lead to extreme behaviours, even bullying.

So how does the social story work?

The social skills story is a short visual story much like a comic script which is used as a visual framework or step by step detailed plan of the skill or situation that the child on the autism spectrum is finding hard.

Many children on the autism spectrum struggle with the chaos of recess, by implementing a social skills story the child will have a concrete plan of recess. This plan WILL explain what is happening and why, which WILL help the child on the autism spectrum cope and feel more comfortable.

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the child’s own point of view and use first person text. The social skills story describes the situation using images and short descriptive sentences or words.

The social story should answer the “wh” questions:-who, what, why, when and where. The social skills story should also answer “how” and provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children on the autism spectrum.

To view and learn more about visual resources for autism like social skills stories for building autistic social skills and to access immediate downloads visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Foster social skills in kids with autism

Thursday, March 15th, 2012

Typically kids with autism HAVE deficits in three main areas of development: social, communication (both verbal and non-verbal) and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is because of these deficits many kids with autism HAVE difficulties understanding and accepting the “hidden social rules of everyday life”.

For example a child on the spectrum WILL commonly miss social cues and be unable to interpret body language or facial expression – so it is of no use “tutting” or giving “knowing nod” these hidden social cues WILL usually be missed!

However there are treatments for autism which foster social skills in kids with autism such as social skills stories and picture communication cards.

These treatments for autism ARE normally USED to help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they normally struggle with like for example asking questions, sharing, making friends and so on…

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text written in a set format which is typically first person text and from the autistic child’s own point of view.

Characteristically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they find visual information easier to understand and follow, therefore it is believed and proven through research that children with autism respond better to visual teaching.

Consequently, social skills stories and picture communication cards DO FOLLOW this belief and ARE typically visual.

The social skills story USES images and pictures with short pieces of text to visually show the child on the spectrum what is happening and why.

The social skills story does this by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

The social skills story can be adapted to suit individual needs and abilities and are generally written in word format with NO FORMAL training needed to use social skills stories.

Teachers and parents can foster social skills in kids with autism using social stories and picture communication cards. To gain immediate download and learn more about how these treatments for autism work visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com 

OR

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

Using visual supports for autism

Monday, February 20th, 2012

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and that speech/language is secondary.

It is therefore believed that for children with autism information and teaching that is VISUAL WILL be far easier for them to understand.

 Using visual supports for autism is therefore beneficial. There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant ARE social stories, PECS, communication picture cards, visual timetables and so on…

Using visual supports for autism WILL help you to teach social skills and address communication difficulties as well as helping to OVERCOME many of the difficulties the child with autism is struggling with.

Social skills stories ARE an important visual intervention strategy which was first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help OVERCOME communication difficulties for children with autism.

Since then the social story has developed and is now probably the most significant support for autism. The social skills story WILL help address the child’s social skills deficits.

All children with autism HAVE social skills deficits these ARE common to autism, but will vary between individuals. Social skills deficits affect how the child with autism processes information, acts, re-acts, behaves and thinks as well processes sensory stimuli and sensation.

The social skills story is a short descriptive piece of text that can act like a visual plan or framework of the skill detailing visually what is happening and what the child with autism CAN expect.

A social skills story WILL always be written from the child’s own perspective and WILL normally always be written in first person text. The social skills story should break the skill into smaller sections much like a comic script and answer the “wh” questions  – who, what, where, why and when as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Typically social stories are written in word format which WILL make them easier to personalize and edit, no two children are ever going to be the same and we all USE different terminology with our kids, therefore the need for editing is important.

For kids with ASD social awareness skills ARE difficult to master but by using visual supports for autism this can be addressed quite simply, which CAN help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they would once struggle with.

To learn more about how kids with ASD can cope with social awareness skills using supports for autism such as social stories and communication picture cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocalstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

What causes autistic behaviour issues?

Monday, February 20th, 2012

To understand what causes autistic behaviour issues it is important to have an understanding of autism.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects how individuals with autism processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts, behaves and processes sensory input or stimuli. The main symptoms of autism ARE social skills deficits in social awareness skills, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is these social skills deficits that ARE the significant factor in what causes autistic behaviour issues. Typically children on the autism spectrum have communication difficulties and may lack the ability to ask or respond to things which their typically developing peers WILL treat as “normal”

For example recess a typically developing child WILL probably enjoy the freedom of recess but for children on the autism spectrum recess may be uncomfortable, stressful and confusing! This may lead to inappropriate behaviour around recess.

For a child with autism the sheer chaos of recess is upsetting, a child with autism WILL prefer sameness, order and routine and recess is none of these things. Children with autism have difficulties in understanding that not everyone shares their interest or feels that same way they do fully.

By taking a look into what causes autistic behaviour issues we can begin to unravel what it is that our own child with autism may be getting upset or confused by. Careful observation of a child with autism CAN help you to determine exactly what is troubling your child.

There are various supports for autism that WILL help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their social skills deficits. Probably one of the most significant of these supports for autism is social skills stories.

These ARE short descriptive pieces of text that describe a situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues. We know that the vast majority of individuals with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and language is used as secondary.

It is important therefore to USE supports for autism which ARE VISUAL like social stories. Social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties focus on a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with and breaks it down into small easy to understand sections using images/pictures and first person text.

The social skills story CAN act much like a visual plan or framework of the skill allowing the child on the spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill. So going back to our recess example earlier, introducing a social story for recess WILL HELP the child with autism prepare for and understand recess. The social skills story can be looked at each day before recess, helping the child with autism feel more comfortable once recess arrives.

The social skills story CAN BE USED for a wide variety of difficulties, such as self-help skills, communication deficits, hygiene skills, behaviours and many more, in-fact almost anything the child with autism is finding hard.

Typically social stories answer the ever important “wh” question – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and WILL offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Students with ASD social supports

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

The main characteristics of autism spectrum disorder ARE social awareness deficits, communication difficulties and imagination deficits, as well as some sensory processing issues and obsessive behaviours.

Typically most children on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, this meas that they think in pictures/images and tend to use speech/language as a secondary tool.

So how CAN this knowledge help us with finding students with ASD social supports?

There ARE a wide variety of supports and tools for autism spectrum disorder, typically the most significant supports and tools for autism WILL be those which ARE visual, for example, PECS, communication picture cards (flash cards), social skills stories and visual social story cards.

For many students with ASD school can be confusing at times and quite chaotic. Typically children on the spectrum like set patterns and routines and WILL dislike any changes to routines or suprises, they WILL PREFER things to remain on an even level.

Therefore most students with autism WILL find particular times of the school day such as recess, break time, PE etc confusing. Using social supports like social stories and communication picture cards CAN help them to cope with and be more setteled during these times of the day.

Social stories ARE short descriptive stories relating to a skill, activity, event, behaviour etc that the child with autism spectrum disorder finds difficult. The social story can act like a visual framework or step by step plan detailing visually what is happening and expected of them.

Social stories and communication picture cards ARE excellent supports and tools for autism to use in and around the classroom and school, they ARE also excellent for at home and ALL other areas the child with autism finds difficult. Using first person text, always from the perspective of the child, the social story uses images/pictures to describe the situtation or skill in a manner the student with autism can better understand.

To learn mre about social stories and picture communication cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school
Alternativelly visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social Skills Teaching for Kids with Autism

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Kids with Autism generally have difficulties with social awareness skills.

Unlike typically developing children that naturally develop social awareness skills through people watching, their peers, parents and the environment.

A distinct lack of social skills can make it difficult for kids with Autism to develop and maintain friendships which in turn could lead to social isolation and in some cases even bullying.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism WILL help provide your child with the tools he needs to understand and function in social situations.

Kids with Autism have difficulties understanding that not everyone will share their opinion, interests, thoughts and feelings, a child on the spectrum will not pick up on social cues from the other person, this can lead to misunderstandings and confusion for the child on the spectrum.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism can help teach your child to recognize the feelings of others.

For example tools like flash cards (picture cards) or social stories for autism can help as an intervention strategy to teach social awareness skills. By using flash cards or social stories for autism children with Autism you can help guide your child in most social situations.

Social stories for autism ARE visual which is important for children with Autism. Typically most children with Autism are visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures, with speech / language as secondary.

The social story looks much like a comic script and acts like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation, such as making friends, approaching people, starting conversations, sharing and so on all skills that a child on the spectrum may struggle with.

The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. They are easy to implement and shoud be editable as no two kids are ever going to be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

Social stories for autism can be used for many different situations and skills
– for example self-help skills, changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and so on. To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school