Posts Tagged ‘flash cards’

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Social awareness skills ARE not naturally learnt by young people with autism, unlike their typically developing peers children with autism DO NOT people watch and lack the ability to naturally learn skills the rest of us take for granted.

Many young people with autism struggle with friendships and find social interaction difficult to master this can lead to misunderstandings and at times social isolation.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies like social stories, flash cards, PECS and so on…

Using Intervention Strategies is beneficial and has been prove effective. Typically children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in images and pictures and will use speech/language as secondary.

This means that Visual Intervention Strategies WILL be far easier for them to understand. Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories need NO formal training to use and can be implemented easily.

The autism social story is a short descriptive piece of text that is specifically written to help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum. The autism social story USES visual images/pictures to describe the skill or situation from the autistic child’s own perspective.

It WILL act like a visual plan of framework of the skill or situation, helping children with autism to feel more comfortable with and in the situation, giving them the opportunity to understand what is expected of them and what in return they CAN expect from others.

The autism social story will help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism using flash cards…

Flash cards ARE small laminated cards with images/pictures printed onto the front of them, some also have small amounts of text. The cards CAN be used as an exchange – for example at snack time the card CAN be given to the teacher in exchange for what is printed onto the front of the card – an apple for example and so on…

Flash cards ARE an excellent means of communication they are also useful around the classroom showing where the bathroom is, the pencil tray and so on… The flash card is also used on visual timetables, now and then boards, choices boards and other means of communication.

To learn more and see examples of autism social stories and flash cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Autistic Visual Supports

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Individuals with autism ARE typically “Visual Thinkers - Visual Learners”, this means that they think in pictures and images and use speech / words as a secondary language.

“I think in pictures. Words are like a second language to me…when somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures… One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills.” (Grandin, 1995).

Therefore presenting information and guidance visually will have a much better impact on individuals with autism.  There are a number of visual supports for autism which WILL help your child on the spectrum learn skills and behaviours that they find confusing, stressful or simply do not understand.

Autistic Visual Supports like: Social Skills Stories, Communication Picture Cards (flash cards), PECS and so on CAN be quickly and easily implemented and need NO formal training to use.

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive visual representations of a skill or behaviour. The social story breaks the skill down into smaller components, removes and un-necessary fluff or language and explains How and why something happens.

The social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, why and when and provides an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.


Autistic Visual Supports - Communication Picture Cards (flash cards)
ARE small laminated cards depicting an image or skill. For eample the Communication Picture Cards can be USED as an exchange -  the child with ASD hands over a picture card in retuen for the item on the card  -for example an apple at snack time and so on.

The Communication Picture Cards are also USED on visual timetables, as pointers around the home or in school, on chices boards, now and next boards and as a communication tool.

Both Social Skills Stories and Communication Picture Cards ARE available from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

To learn more about Autistic Visual Supports and how they can benefit your child with ASD visit today and download Social Skills Stories which can be adapted to suit individual needs, no two children are the smane and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore it is important that the social story you choose is editable.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Social Skills Teaching for Kids with Autism

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Kids with Autism generally have difficulties with social awareness skills.

Unlike typically developing children that naturally develop social awareness skills through people watching, their peers, parents and the environment.

A distinct lack of social skills can make it difficult for kids with Autism to develop and maintain friendships which in turn could lead to social isolation and in some cases even bullying.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism WILL help provide your child with the tools he needs to understand and function in social situations.

Kids with Autism have difficulties understanding that not everyone will share their opinion, interests, thoughts and feelings, a child on the spectrum will not pick up on social cues from the other person, this can lead to misunderstandings and confusion for the child on the spectrum.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism can help teach your child to recognize the feelings of others.

For example tools like flash cards (picture cards) or social stories for autism can help as an intervention strategy to teach social awareness skills. By using flash cards or social stories for autism children with Autism you can help guide your child in most social situations.

Social stories for autism ARE visual which is important for children with Autism. Typically most children with Autism are visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures, with speech / language as secondary.

The social story looks much like a comic script and acts like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation, such as making friends, approaching people, starting conversations, sharing and so on all skills that a child on the spectrum may struggle with.

The social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. They are easy to implement and shoud be editable as no two kids are ever going to be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

Social stories for autism can be used for many different situations and skills
- for example self-help skills, changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and so on. To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Autism products

Monday, January 30th, 2012

Autism is a complex neurological disorder which affects on average 1 in every 150 born. Typically the ratio of boys being diagnosed autistic is higher than females at  the ratio 4:1 males being diagnosed autistic.

There are no known cures for autism spectrum disorder BUT there are treatments for autism which can help alleviate many of the symptoms of autism.

The main symptoms of autism being deficits in social awareness, communication difficulties both verbal and non-verbal communication is affected and imagination skills. Typically most autistics also display some sensory processing issues.

Probably some of the most significant treatments for autism available ARE social skills stories, visual social story cards, PECS and flash cards to name a few.

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder will have difficulties in expressing how they feel or what they need, this can cause confusion for parents and teachers, and cause the child much anxiety and stress.

Autism products such as social skills stories and flash cards can be put in place to help the child understand and be understood more effectively.

Social stories ARE autism products which were first introduced around twenty years ago and have grown in use and popularity since there introduction by therapist Carol Gray.

Social stories break down the skill or behaviour into smaller easier to understand sections and use visual images / pictures to show and explain the skill or behaviour from the autistic child’s own perspective.

Much like a comic script conversation the social story is used like a visual plan or framework answering the ever important “WH” questions - who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” the social story will also give the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. This is a known area of weakness for most autistics.

As well as providing a visual plan the social skills story, visual social story cards and flash cards ARE also used as a means of communication.

For example flash cards ARE used  as a means of communication providing the child on the spectrum with a  selection of small laminated cards to show or exchange for what ever it is they need. So for example at snack time the child may hand the teacher a card showing the picture of an apple in return the teacher would then give the child an apple and so on.

Autism products such as social skills stories, visual social story cards and folders as well as flash cards are now available for download at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Download Visual Supports for Your Child on the Spectrum

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

For many families with children on the spectrum using visual supports WILL give their child relief from many of the social awareness and communication skills that they struggle to understand and cope with.

However for some families finding appropriate visual supports for autism can be an issue.  There are many different visual supports for autism available, choosing the right support for your child on the spectrum can be challenging!

Looking at How to Download Visual Supports for your Child on the Spectrum

 

1.       Autism Social Skills Stories

Autism Social Skills Stories are short descriptive stories that can help explain visually how and why something happens. For example some children with autism may struggle to make friends or ask other children to play. A social story can help the child on the spectrum learn how to approach other children, what they may expect and in turn what the child on the spectrum should expect.

The social story uses visual images and first person text in an almost comic like fashion answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about Autism Social Skills Stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

2.       Visual Social Story Cards

Just like a social story the visual social story cards are short specifically written cards that offer a child on the spectrum ways of coping with skills and behaviours that they are struggling to master.

The visual social story card is a small laminated card generally 8 x 11, each card has an appropriate image and short sentence to describe what is happening from the autistic child’s point of view.

To learn more about Visual Social Story Cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

3.       Visual Flash Cards

Visual Flash Cards and used as a means of communication. The cards are generally 9 x 13 in size and will display a printed picture on the front with a short written description. The visual flash cards can be used in many different ways as an exchange, on a visual timetable and as communication aids.

Visual flash cards are very handy to re-enforce skills for example snack time at school a card can be exchanged in return for the appropriate treat or snack and so on…

To learn more about Visual Flash Cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

There are many other visual supports for autism available, but these are our top tips and will generally be sufficient for the majority of children with autism.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Visual Social Stories

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Typically children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in images/pictures.

Therefore visual information and teaching/learning strategies ARE found to be more beneficial.

There are various forms of visual supports for autism – for example visual social stories, visual social story cards, flash cards, PECS and many more.

These are probably the most significant of the visual supports for autism and generally need no formal training to use.

Many parents and teachers of children with autism find supports like visual social stories a real help and report less stress and meltdowns after social stories or other visual supports have been introduced.

What is a visual social story?

A visual social story is a short descriptive story detailing with images/pictures a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with – for example making friends, playing games, taking turns and so on.

The visual social story WILL answer the “wh” questions who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

The visual social story is much like a visual framework or step by step plan of the skill, situation or behaviour. Typically visual social stories are written in first person text and will always be from the autistic child’s own point of view.

A social story can be introduced for most situations. We all use different terminology with our child, therefore the social story ought to be editable and easy to personalize making it relevant for any child on the spectrum.

To learn more about visual supports for autism including visual social stories, visual social story cards and flash cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Auditory autistic processing issues

Saturday, October 8th, 2011

Auditory autistic processing issues ARE generally associated with several autistic characteristics. Typically for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder social awareness and communication problems ARE common autistic characteristics.

For individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder communication skills both verbal and non-verbal pose problems.

Auditory autistic processing issues CAN also lead to anxiety or confusion in social situations, inattentiveness, and poor speech comprehension.

However there are methods parents and teachers can adopt which WILL HELP children with autism understand and learn social awareness and communication skills.

The vast majority of children with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners which means that they use visual images as their first language and speech/words (auditory) as a second language.

Therefore many parents and teachers USE VISUAL strategies – such as visual flash cards, PECS, visual support cards and autism social skills stories.

Visual flash cards ARE used as a means of communication; they work particularly well with children on the spectrum with poor or no speech. The visual flash cards are used as communication prompts as well as social cues and communication cards.

Visual support cards ARE also a very good means of communication they are used to help the child on the spectrum understand and learn social and communication skills.

Autism social skills stories ARE probably one of the most significant resources used with children on the spectrum. They answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and WILL generally give the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of marked weakness in most children on the spectrum.

The social skills story acts like a visual framework or plan of the skill or communication difficulty and will give the child on the spectrum an idea of what is expected of them and in return what they should expect from others.

For many parents and teachers their child’s Auditory autistic processing issues CAN be greatly improved when visual strategies are adopted.

To learn more about any of the above visual strategies please visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

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Teach self help skills in autism

Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010

Learning self help skills such as: eating, dressing, toileting, and personal hygiene can be challenging for people with autism, but are essential for independence.


Teaching self help skills can help a child with autism become less dependent on those around him, and reduce stress and anxieties.


Children on the autism spectrum often have poor fine motor skills this can make some self help skills difficult to master such as doing buttons.


Parents should initiate self help skills as it is unlikely a child with autism will dress independently in anticipation of any praise. However if your child with autism feels more comfortable doing things themselves then allow them to do so.


For many parents and teachers of children on the spectrum visual strategies which teach self help skills in autism ARE proving beneficial.

 

Such visual strategies as social skills stories, PECS and flash cards can help children on the spectrum reach independence in self help and hygiene skills and routines.

 

Many children with autism also have sensory processing issues and find tasks such as tooth brushing, visiting a dentist, getting a haircut and trying new foods problematic, causing anxieties and in many cases meltdowns.


By implementing visual strategies such as social skills stories and flash cards parents can help their ASD child learn skills and behaviours that they are finding hard to understand or master.


Social skills stories are visual strategies which ARE used widely to teach autism social skills and behaviours.


Using visual images or pictures the social skills story breaks the skill or behaviour down into smaller pieces visually showing the steps necessary to complete the task, reducing any anxiety of the unknown, helping the ASD child feel more in control and comfortable.

 

Using first person text in a manner easily understood by the autistic person the social skills story acts as a role model or visual plan of the skill. The social skills story answers the ever important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when, what and “HOW” as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others.


To learn more about how social stories for self help skills can help an autistic person learn skills and behaviours they find difficult and frustrating visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Alternatively, other social skills stories including some social stories for self help skills can be found by visiting http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Visual supports in autism

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Individuals with autism are often described as “visual learners” or “visual thinkers.” Which means they think in pictures, consequently autism resources need to be visual.

Research suggests greater success when parents and teachers use visual supports rather than oral or written supports and resources.

Such visual supports in autism resources as social skills stories, flash cards, visual schedules, PECS system etc. 

There are many aspects of an autistic child’s environment and everyday activities which will benefit from visual supports for autism.

Using social skills stories - Social stories are word and picture-based stories, much like a comic strip conversation, written to help the child with autism understand and feel more comfortable with skills, activities, communication and social situations.

Social stories are normally written in a specific manner, from the autistic child’s point of view and always using first person text and visual images. By answering the important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into how other people may feel or think.

Using visual schedules - Visual schedules are a set of pictures that communicate a series of activities or the steps of a specific activity. A visual schedule can help the child with autism understand and manage their daily activities, which reduces stress and anxiety.

Using visual supports in autism such as flash cards - A common problem for children with autism spectrum disorder is their ability to communicate. Flash cards are a strategy which can help to increase vocabulary, promote language development, and strengthen communication skills when teaching.

All of these strategies are useful for individuals with autism and related conditions.

To learn more about how social skills stories can benefit your child with an ASD and gain immediate downloads of social stories for autistic children visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Where you will find a selection of social skills stories for autistic children and young people

To learn more about visual supports in autism such as flash cards and visual schedules visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual.html

Where you will find a selection of flash cards available for visual schedules and as communication aids for ASD children

 

Other visual supports in autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Autism teaching aids and visual strategies

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

For children on the spectrum a lack of social and communication skills is common. Due to social skills deficits many children on the spectrum find the world confusing and stressful a lack of appropriate communication skills can mean a lack of friendships and in some cases bullying and isolation.

 

And for many parents teaching social and communication skills to their autistic child can become a primary focus.

 

Children with autism like structure and routines and can become frustrated and anxious when routines change, they dislike surprises and may display obsessive behaviours which can make the child appear odd or weird.


Consequently, because of these social skills deficits many parents and teachers struggle to find appropriate techniques and autism teaching aids that are easy to implement and suitable.


It is a fact that the majority of children on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and will therefore respond better to visual strategies; such as a visual schedule, social skills stories, flash cards, PECS communication symbols and so on.

 

A visual strategy can be implemented to suit the individual needs of the autistic child. Many parents and teachers use a combination of visual strategies, all of which compliment each other.

 

No two autistic children will ever be the same and what works for one autistic child may not be suitable for another.


That said, the vast majority of autistic children use social skills stories as primary autism teaching aids to help them better cope with daily tasks and activities as well as the not so common activities and tasks.

 

Parents do not need any formal training or previous knowledge to use Autism teaching aids and visual strategies.


A visual strategy such as social skills stories can be used to help the autistic child learn social and communication skills that they may be struggling to master, like for example making friends, asking questions, respecting personal space, or less common activities such as going for a dental visit, visiting grand parents, a birthday party and so on.


For children with autism understanding our world is difficult, therefore addressing any anxieties they may have can help cut down on anxiety attacks, melt downs and negative behaviours.

 

Introducing a visual schedule will benefit your child, a visual schedule gives the child on the spectrum a step by step framework of the day’s activities using simple pictures or images, reducing surprises and giving routine to the day.


Social skills stories break down the activity or skill into small easier to understand pieces. Using visual images and pictures the social skills stories are visual strategies that show the child on the spectrum by answering the “wh” question - who, where, why, when and what, it will also give the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others why and how we undertake certain activities for example brushing our teeth, washing our hands, raising our hand to speak, recess and so on.


Flash cards and PECS communication symbols are visual strategies that can be used effectively with both verbal and nonverbal autistic children. They are universally used for visual schedules to accompany social skills stories, on now and next boards, mini visual schedules, choosing boards and as autism teaching aids.


Flash cards are small laminated pieces of card showing an image or picture some flash cards will also have a small piece of text saying what the picture is of for example, coat, toilet, pencil etc. The idea being the PECS communication symbols or flash cards be used to communicate with the child on the spectrum, they are used in various ways and settings.


For more information on autism teaching aids and visual strategies visit:


For social skills stories which can be downloaded immediately go to:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

For flash cards and communication symbols which can be used in a variety of ways such as on visual schedules or on their own as a means of communication visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

Motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Motivating a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder is not going to be easy. By definition a child with autism will almost certainly have a restricted repertoire of interests and skills as well as difficulties with social interactions, imagination and communication skills.

Many parents will struggle to teach social and communication skills to their child. But without planned, positive experiences, and resources that are designed to help teach appropriate skills and behaviors many children with ASD often become victimized by their autism as they age.

Strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder should include visual supports such as social skills stories, PECS and  flash cards.

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images or pictures, which makes understanding oral or written instruction or information difficult for them.

Therefore motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder is better achieved when visual supports are implemented. Many strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder are now available from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Parents do not need any formal training to use social skills stories or flash cards, these visual strategies are easy to implement and used successfully both in the home and classroom.

Social skills stories are probably one of the major tools used to help teach and motivate children with autism spectrum disorder. Since their development twenty years ago social stories have grown in popularity and are now readily used by parents, teachers and professionals caring for special needs kids with autism and related conditions.

Developed by therapist Carol Gray social stories are short visual strategies that detail skills and situations the child with autism is struggling to master or understand. Using visual images and first person text the social story acts as a role model or visual plan answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into how others are thinking and feeling.

 

To learn more about how a social story could help your child visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find detailed information on social stories and how they can be used to teach and motivate children with autism.

 

Other sites of interest include:

 

Flash cards can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

Strategies used for motivating students with autism

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010


Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. The disorder is characterized by a set of symptoms known as the triad of impairments, these are:

 

Social interactions skills deficits

Communication skills deficits

Imagination skills deficits.

 

This triad of impairments or social skills deficits as they are more commonly referred to are common to all individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Therefore students with autism will almost certainly display social skills deficits.

The autistic student will have social skills impairments which can affect their ability to communicate with and understand others.

 

The autistic student will lack social interaction and flexibility skills, preferring set patterns and routines, this inability to be flexible can cause stress and anxiety if routines are changed even slightly.


These social skills deficits can make understanding communication and social skills in the classroom and around school difficult for the ASD student.


It is true to say that individuals with ASD cannot easily behave in a typical “more normal” way. An autistic student will not purposefully disrupt the class; all autistic behaviour happens for a reason an external or internal (illness) factor.


It is these external and internal factors that trigger a negative autistic behaviour through sheer frustration with situations and with other people.


Teaching the ASD student is difficult. Strategies can be put in place that can help deal with the affects of the student’s social skills deficits, which can help the motivation and behaviours displayed by the ASD student.

Strategies used for motivating students with autism can include visual schedules, PECS, flash cards, autism symbols and social skills stories.


For the majority of students with autism a combination of all these autism resources is favourable. However for many students with autism probably one of the most useful autism resources available is social skills stories.


Social stories as strategies used for motivating students with autism are short visual strategies used to show a skill or situation that the student is struggling with. Using visual images and first person text the social story is used like a role model of the skill or situation. Detailing the skill by giving the student with autism the relevant social cues, answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and giving an insight into the emotions, thoughts and nonverbal communication shown or felt by others.


Easy to implement, personalize and with no formal training needed to use social skills stories are used widely in the classroom for dealing with issues such as staying on task, calling out, asking question, recess, P.E. lessons and so on.

 

To learn more about autism resources and strategies for motivation students with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

OR

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Other autism resources such as autism symbols and flash cards are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

And social skills stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Definition of the Characteristics of autism spectrum disorder

Saturday, May 22nd, 2010


Research into ASD suggests that the definitions of the characteristics of autism spectrum disorder: are the individual’s inability to socialize and communicate effectively.  A child with ASD will have the inability to interact or communicate socially.

 

The typical definition of the characteristics of autism spectrum disorder, are commonly known as the social skills deficits these include:

 

* Uncoordinated motor movements and clumsiness.

* Poor posture

* Social impairments

* Limited interests and sometimes unusual preoccupations

* The need for repetition and ritualistic obsessions, like lining up possessions, collecting timetables and so on…

* Inability to communicate effectively lack of ability to understand wit, humour, puns and slang words

* Inability to read body language or facial expression, lack of eye contact

* Inappropriate behaviours

* Speech and language deficits - odd use of language and sometimes language can be delayed.

* Appearing to lack the ability to understand others feelings and emotions; one sided friendships; there way or no way!

 

Autism spectrum disorder is probably the most common childhood disorder today.  There is no cure for autism it is a life long disorder.


However, although there is no cure for autism there are efficient treatments for autism that can help the symptoms of autism, the characteristics.

 

Generally an individual with autism spectrum disorder will have quite good rote memory, and may also display an intense interest in a certain topic to the exclusion of anything else.

 

These interests can sometimes be with the strangest of things; for example a bus timetable, a clock even some marbles etc.

 

Research shows us that treatments for autism like social skills stories, PECS and flash cards are an effective means of teaching and addressing the social skills deficits associated with this disorder.

 

Probably the biggest hurdle faced by an individual with autism spectrum disorder is a lack of social awareness and deficits in social skills and communications.

 

For individuals with ASD learning social and communication skills is not going to happen naturally as it would for a typically developing individual therefore individuals with ASD need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Autism social skills stories ARE excellent resources, designed to help the child with ASD understand and deal with situations and activities that the rest of us take for granted like tooth brushing or catching a train or bus.

 

Autism social skills stories are like a role model or a blueprint to independent life and those things we take for granted like - shopping trips or flushing toilets.

 

An individual with autism spectrum disorder may be confused by certain situations and struggle to understand things like friendships, being a good sport and so on.

 

These are areas that autism social skills stories can help, by providing the child with ASD with clear precise information and instruction in a visual format through text and visual images like a comic script depicting the skill or situation.

 

Used for a variety of situations and skills that the individual with autism is finding confusing or that may be making them anxious or aggressive. The social story can be edited to personalize it and printed for convenience and use anywhere.

 

To learn more about how a social story could benefit your autistic child or young person visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

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Alternatively other autism social skills stories for your autistic child or teen can be found at:

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/potty

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/howto

www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior


For flash cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Autism and brain development and how it affects learning

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010


ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects four times more males than females. Some research suggests autism caused by genetic factors that interfere with normal brain development, or environmental factors, such as the effects of pollution or the damage caused by viruses. However how autism is caused is still under research. Autism Spectrum Disorder is normally detected in children before the age of three and is a life long condition.

 

No two people are ever the same and this runs true with Autism Spectrum Disorder which affects individuals in various ways. However the characteristics of autism are generally grouped together and called the triad of autistic impairments. Every individual with ASD will have to varying degree’s the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments means difficulties with three areas of development; social communication, social interaction and imagination skills and behaviours. Probably the most apparent of the characteristics of autism is the way a person’s ability to communicate both verbally and non-verbally with others is affected.

 

So when considering autism and brain development and how it affects learning it is beneficial to remember all individuals with autism will have marked difficulties with communication both verbal and non-verbal skills.

 

An Individual with ASD will have difficulties understanding things that we probably take for granted like jokes, metaphors wit and slang, this form of communication may be indecipherable to an individual with ASD. It is suggested that using visual cues such as flash cards and social stories can help overcome this hurdle. You should also try to adapt how you speak, speak less and be more direct, don’t use metaphors or slang and say exactly what you mean.

 

Therefore with autism and brain development and how it affects learning can be aided using visual cues. An autistic person is far more likely to respond to visual cues like flash cards and social stories rather than written or spoken information or instruction.

 

One of the primary worries for many parents with autistic children is how their child will learn play autism spectrum disorder affects a person’s ability to use their imagination. This makes play difficult for autistic children and in a lot of instances a child with ASD will simply prefer to line up their toys or arrange them in certain ways rather than play with them.

 

Many autistic children may also develop ritualistic behaviours and become obsessive about certain things or objects this can take different forms from obsession with a TV character to train timetables.


Generally social skills stories and flash cards can help the child with ASD understand play skills effectively, as well as how to make and maintain friendships.

 

Social skills stories are short descriptive visual role model of an activity, situation or skill that the child with ASD is struggling to understand, finds stressful or simply can not cope with. The social skills story will also help with transition, and other skills such as hygiene, sharing, taking turns calming down and so on.

 

A social skills story can be edited and personalized to suit individual children specific needs. Most social stories are visual with images and first person text.

 

To finds out more about flash cards or social skills stories and how they are to help children with ASD as well as how they affect autism and brain development and how it affects learning visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Teaching social skills to children with autism

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

For the majority of children with autism direct teaching of social skills is necessary. Unlike their typically developing peers children with autism do not naturally acquire social skills from people watching or the environment. For many autistic children the ability to understand and read subtle cues, facial expressions, verbal and nonverbal communication and people’s body language is missing, which makes interpreting meaning challenging.

Teaching social skills to children with autism can take many forms from PECS and visual flash cards to ABA and social skills stories.

For many parents of autistic children choosing a school is difficult. To attend mainstream education children with autism or asperger syndrome will need a certain amount of social skills. Inclusion in a mainstream school is often not dependent solely on the child’s IQ or intelligence. Many children with autism or asperger syndrome are capable of working at the required level, but are not being accepted into mainstream education due to behavioral issues or poorly developed social skills.

Teaching social skills to children with autism is not easy, for many autistic children understanding instruction is difficult. However there are certain treatments of autism which can help overcome this hurdle.

Generally children on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they will comprehend information or instruction easier if it is given visually, for example images or pictures etc. rather than written or spoken instruction.

Therefore teaching social skills to children on the spectrum can be achieved far easier using visual tools and methods such as visual flash cards and social skills stories, both of which are visual and are proven successful methods.

A good social story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction. Some examples of social stories would be assembly, sharing, taking turns, not shouting out, recess etc. These are all good examples of social stories. The social story serves a number of purposes. The most important aspect being that the social story provides the child on the spectrum with a role model, something to follow visually.

Social stories address the “wh” question (who, where, why, when and what) as well as give an insight into the thinking, emotions and actions of others. It will also explain the actions and reactions expected of the child on the spectrum. Social stories are generally written following a specific pattern and normally by experts although some parents have learnt how to write social stories themselves.

Not all social skills stories are perfect. It may well be that a particular social story does not have exactly the desired effect or address all the necessary elements of a situation. Be prepared to occasionally rewrite a social story to make it more effective.

To find out more about social stories and how they can be implemented for teaching social skills to children with autism visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Using visual strategies for autism and preschool

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010


It is common for preschool aged children with autism to have difficulties moving on from activities or tasks. Generally all preschool aged children with autism will prefer routines and want things to stay constant and the same, without deviations or changes no matter how small.

 

The need for routine is common to autism and forms part of the symptoms of autism.

 

It is not uncommon for a preschool aged autistic child to get stuck on an activity especially if it interests them and teachers can have a difficult time trying to move the child onto the next thing. The preschool aged autistic child can become anxious even agitated or aggressive when the teacher tries to encourage them onto a new activity.

 

These difficulties can make the ever changing preschool environment confusing and stressful to the autistic child.

 

Research into how teachers can best cope within preschool suggests that using visual strategies for autism and preschool can be beneficial.

 

Using visual strategies for autism and preschool such as a visual schedule, flash cards, PECS and social skills stories are known to help teachers communicate and cope with the autistic child in their care.

 

Children with autism can become anxious when things change or they do not know what is happening, such as moving onto the next activity. By implementing a visual schedule the autistic child can see the days plan. Thus removing anxieties about what is happening, giving them information about what to expect now or next, therefore reducing the stress of not knowing.

 

PECS and flash cards can be used to help children with autism recognise areas for example the bathroom, sink, where the pencils are etc. A small picture is placed above the area showing the autistic child exactly where something is. Preschool aged autistic children can become anxious when things or places are not clear. A preschool aged autistic child is not inquisitive and will not look for the pencil draw for example.

 

PECS and flash cards are also used as a means of communication, for example a teacher can show the preschool aged autistic child a picture or image, for example of a drink to let the autistic child know it is time for a drink etc.

 

Children with autism will understand information far quicker and simpler if the information is visual. Try to talk less and use visual strategies as, children with autism think in pictures, they are visual thinkers and learners.

 

It is also recommended that teachers of preschool aged children with autism try using visual strategies for autism and preschool such as social skills stories. Teachers are able to share the social skills story with the autistic child to help them understand the “wh” question (who, where, why, when and what).

 

So for example if the preschool autistic child struggles to understand why Mummy leaves in the morning, the teacher or Mum may share a social skills story showing visually why Mummy goes, where she goes and when she will return, taking away the anxiety the preschool autistic child is feeling.

 

Another example would be snack time, a social skills story can show the child, when it is snack time, why the children have snack time, what they can expect to happen and how they will be expected to behave, again removing the anxiety.

 

These are just a few suggestions. To find out more about using visual strategies for autism and preschool such as PECS and flash cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Social skills stories can be found at

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Autistic children in preschool

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

Many parents of autistic children feel confused and helpless wondering how to communicate with their child and ensure their child has the opportunity to reach their full potential.


Research does suggest early intervention strategies for autistic children are beneficial, and that enrollment for autistic children in preschool can also help the child.

 

Your G.P. will be able to point you in the right direction with regard to early intervention strategies for autistic children.

 

Many parents of autistic children opt to place their child in mainstream preschool.  It is always a good idea to make an appointment to visit the preschool and discuss your child with the teacher to ensure she is aware of what autism is and that appropriate provisions are in place before your child begins.


If you are the teacher of an inclusive preschool a good place for you to start will be with the introduction of appropriate visual support tools for preschool children with autism. 


There are many visual support tools available today, with PECS, flash cards and social stories being among the most significant visual support tools for preschool children with autism that are available to you. All of which can now be sourced directly from the internet, as well as from OT and the speech therapist.

 

Using visual support tools for preschool children with autism do not need any form of formal training, sites offering good support and visual tools can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Personally we recommend the use of both flash cards and social stories combined. By placing visual supports like flash cards around the preschool you can help the preschool autistic infant quickly identify certain areas, for example a picture of the toilet above the bathroom allows the child to find the toilet without causing the stress and anxiety. This is repeated around preschool in areas the child will need to identify like the pencil tray, sink, coast pegs etc.

 

Social stories for the preschool autistic infant are short descriptive visual scripts used as a tool to teach and improve social and communication skills. The preschool autistic infant may have difficulties interacting in play, or understanding make believe, ask for a drink etc. A social story will help the child address these difficulties.

 

Social stories are much like a comic strip showing the skill or behavior in visual images with age appropriate text always in first person and from the child’s point of view.

 

To find out more about social stories for the preschool autistic infant visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool