Posts Tagged ‘diagnosis of autism’

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

 

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Children on the autistic spectrum do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with children on the autistic spectrum.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autism child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after receiving a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children on the autistic spectrum learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, having autism and making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children on the autistic spectrum. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the child with ASD always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the child with ASD.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like having autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Autism Supports and Treatments

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can come a s a great shock to many parents.

It is thought that an average of 1 in every 150 babies is going to be given a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder before they attend school, this number is astonishing. Research into autism suggests that there is no one reason for autism, and that there is no cure.

While there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, there are various autism supports and treatments available that can and will help with the symptoms of autism.

Autism supports and treatments can help  with disruptive behaviors, and teach self-help skills that allow for greater independence.  So what are the main symptoms of autism? social awareness deficits, communication difficulties both in verbal and non-verbal communication, imagination skills deficits as well as some stereotypical behaviours and sensory processing issues.

Autism supports and treatments ARE often reffered to as “Intervention Strategies”

Which Intervention Strategies will work for your child is mainy dependant on your child’s own personal abilities. No two children with autism spectrum disorder will ever be the same, and therefore the approach will be different. However one of the most significant treatments of autism is Social Skills Stories and ARE adaptable to suit all.

Social Skills Stories ARE used to help teach social awareness skills, deal with communication difficulties and help the child on the spectrum overcome many of the symptoms of autism that they display.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill or behaviour from the child’s own perspective, breaking the skill or behaviour down into small relevant chunks that the child on the spectrum can understand.

The social story looks much like a comic script with visual images and small pices of first person text. Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in pictures and will gain far more from visual intervention strategies like social  stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.

Commonly visual intervention strategies like the social story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will also provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum disorder.

To implement social skills stories for autism and to learn more about what autism supports and treatments are avauilable visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Alternatively you will find immediate download of socials stories for autism from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

After a diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Autism is probably one of the most frequent developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born getting a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be testing to accept, the autism child will undoubtedly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically budding children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The autistic child lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents describe after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their autistic child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Which resources to use with an autistic child

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Autism is one of the most common developmental disorders yet still it is misunderstood.

Being the parent of an autistic child is one of the toughest challenges a parent can face. However with early diagnosis of autism, the challenges can be lessened.

Understanding which resources to use with an autistic child can be confusing, with so many treatments for autism available, many parents struggle to understand and decide which resources will best suit their own individual child.

Unfortunately, the symptoms of autism can be severe in some children with an ASD, some children with an ASD may never develop speech may have other educational difficulties and seizures. While other children with an ASD may have average or above average intelligence, although in most cases speech will be slow to develop.

Although there is nothing that can be done to reverse autism, therefore a diagnosis of autism is a lifelong disability. However there are strategies parents of autistic children can use to help with the symptoms of autism.

So which resources to use with an autistic child? What is available and how can you access them quickly and easily?

Generally being the parent of an autistic child can be isolating, frustrating and confusing. Many parents of autistic children use resources such as autism social skills stories, to help their child develop age appropriate skills and behaviours that their typically developing peers are learning naturally.

Studies into the behaviour patterns of children with autism show that most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners no matter which end of the autism scale they are on. This knowledge helps us determine which kind of resources may be needed to help children with autism learn skills and behaviours effectively.

Generally visual thinkers and learners will better understand information when it is presented visually through images, pictures, graphs etc rather that through written words or orally. For children with autism on either end of the autism scale visual representations and information is better received and understood.

Visual resources for children with autism are available from many sites like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  Visual resources for children with autism such as social skills stories can be implemented and used effectively to help show and teach children with an ASD appropriate skills and behaviours. For example social skills stories are used to help autistic children learn behaviours such as making friends, controlling negative behaviours, asking questions, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, using the toilet and so on.

Social skills stories are like a comic script, visual, colourful, use first person language, can be edited, printed and personalized. Social skills stories are like a role model detailing the skill or behaviour in appropriate language and images easy to use, follow and versatile, can be edited and convenient to use. Social skills stories are one of the most popular autism resources used today, and have great uses in the nursery, classroom, college, work place and at home or out and about they can be used in most situation the autistic child struggles with for example the dentist, a hospital visit, birthday party, school trip, wedding etc.

To find out more about social stories and there uses visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com or one of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders. Research suggests that 1 in every 150 children born will receive a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no known cure for autism.


For many families a diagnosis of autism is devastating, however this need not be the case. Autism Spectrum Disorder is common and there are various methods and treatments of autism available. For most families after a diagnosis of autism has been given Early Intervention is probably going to be the most useful, this will help address the child’s social skills deficits.

 

So what are social skills deficits?  Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. Meaning the autistic child will have social and communication difficulties, social skills deficits are characteristically deficits with:

Social skills

Communication difficulties

Imagination difficulties

And Interaction skills

 

Social skills deficits are quite often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “Theory of mind”.

 

Typically developing children have a natural ability to recognize and read other peoples thoughts and feelings for example as typically developing individuals we would recognize a frown as a sign of confusion or unhappiness, and a smile as a sign of pleasure or happiness. This ability to recognize the feelings and emotions of others is missing with autism.


Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

A lack of social skills, their social skills deficits, can make it hard for the autistic child to interact socially and many parents fear their autistic child will struggle with friendships and social situations.

 

There are various treatments of autism which are available to parents over the internet, which HELP to address the social skills deficits and communication difficulties that are displayed by an autistic child, such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers can use social skills stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children with autism spectrum disorder.


Social stories are normally written by experts, using appropriate first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic child. Social stories use visual images to help the child with autism spectrum disorder understand what is expected of them and in return what they can expect. Social skills stories for autism answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism spectrum disorder feel more comfortable with and in situations they may struggle to master or understand, which will cut back on negative behaviors.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Prognosis for autism

Tuesday, May 4th, 2010

It would not be fair to assume how an individual child will develop and grow.  It is a fact that all children will grow irrespective of their personal circumstance or educational ability.

 

Therefore the prognosis for autism remains the same, research suggests around 1 in every 300 children will receive a diagnosis of autism with approximately 30% of these children that receive a diagnosis of autism will be classified as high functioning or asperger children.

 

No matter what the prognosis of autism is diagnosed for your child all children with autism will display social skills deficits, the severity will depend largely on the individual child.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder have a normal life expectancy and in a lot of cases will lead a relatively normal life, once their social skills deficits are addressed sufficiently.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a life long condition and a diagnosis of autism will not be cured or outgrown.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder a lack of social skills can be challenging and cause great anxieties, especially for those children opting for mainstream education. A typically developing child may not truly understand autism and what the condition is all about; therefore this can lead to bullying in some cases.

 

It is a good idea if you are opting to place your autistic child in mainstream education that you make certain the appropriate autism classroom accommodations are set up and that teachers and pupils understand autism and what the condition is all about, this will reduce anxieties and stress for not only the teacher, you and your child.

 

Teachers can use autism classroom accommodations such as visual support cards, visual schedules for autism, social stories and other autism treatments to ensure a positive learning environment for the autistic student.

 

The prognosis of autism in the classroom is very good with high functioning autistic students generally having average or above average intelligence. However it is fair to say that the concentration span of the autistic student may be somewhat shorter that a typically developing student.

 

There are methods that teachers can introduce that will help the autistic student concentrate better and understand school rules. Probably the most significant autism tools for this are social skills stories for students with autism. These are designed to help the student with autism understand what is expected of them in school and lessons as well as what they may expect from the teacher and other pupils.

 

Normally social skills stories for students with autism are written by experts and will follow a pre-set formula which was first used almost twenty years ago. Since then social skills stories have become one of the most significant autism tools available and are used with great effect in the classroom and home of the autistic child.

 

A social story is a short visual script much like a comic strip, that details a skill, situation or behaviour that the autistic child is struggling with for example, recess or assembly the social story will break the situation down into understandable chunks and use appropriate first person text and visual images to explain and answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism grasp what is happening, what is expected of them, suggest possible outcomes and allow the child to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Sites that offer social skills stories for students with autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Alternatively other sites offering social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.org.uk

http://www.autismsocialskillsstories.org.uk

http://www.autismsocialstories.co.uk

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

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In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


Life after a diagnosis of autism

Saturday, November 7th, 2009

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world; autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders today with 1 in every 150 children receiving a diagnosis of autism.

 

Scientists still have no cure for autism, but strive to find answers to the burning questions what is autism and how is it cured?

 

So as we know it what is autism and how do we cope and move forward with life after a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder? Autism spectrum disorder is a complex set of autism symptoms or characteristics all pertaining to the way a child develops (brain) the autism symptoms or characteristics affect the way a child develops in the triad of autistic impairments.

 

Put simply the triad of autistic impairments are deficits in the way the autism child develops skills and behaviors their social, communication, imagination and interaction skills will be poor and not develop in the normal way.


For typically developing children these skills develop naturally without us needing to really put much thought and effort into their development, for example typically developing children will be naturally inquisitive, will want physical contact, can make eye contact, will quickly learn to point, will crawl, stand, play, and want the interaction of peers and family members.

 

For the autism child these natural skills need to be encouraged and will need direct teaching.

 

Although there is no cure for autism there are treatments for autism that make the life of the autism child much easier and allow them to develop to their full potential. Autism spectrum disorder is not a mental disorder, but that said some kids with autism, those on the lower end of the autism spectrum scale may not develop speech or it may develop late and may display educational difficulties.

 

Generally those kids with autism on the higher end of the autism spectrum scale will be of average to above average intelligence and you may here them referred to as “the little professor” or “geeks”.

 

One of the major treatments for autism that can really help the autism child and parent is social stories. These can help bridge that gap and teach the social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors that the rest of us take for granted.

 

Since their development almost twenty years ago treatment for social skills deficits in autism has moved forward in huge leaps and bounds. Parents, teachers and all others involved in and child’s care can use social stories with the child to help connect and teach skills and behaviors the autism child may not understand or may find stressful.

 

The social stories can be used for all social skills deficits in autism from the very basic like mastering tooth brushing, wiping your nose, to the more complex like making friends, controlling behaviors, asking questions, being a good sport and so on they are very versatile, editable and usually visually rich following set guidelines and using appropriate text.

 

For many parents life after a diagnosis of autism can move forward significantly using social stories they can help their child feel more comfortable with skills, situations, events and behaviors their child is struggling with making family life tolerable and also life in school easier and less stressful for their child.

 

Generally all kids with autism respond well to social stories and huge success are normally reported for this excellent tool in the treatment for social skills deficits in autism.


To download and find out more about the benefits of social stories for kids with autism and how they help as a “significant” treatment for social skills deficits in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites are also good portals of social stories for kids with autism:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

What are the physical characteristics of autism?

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

There are not any outward physical characteristics of autism, you would probably not be able to look at a person and immediately notice that he or she is autistic?


That is until you try to communicate with that person. Generally, the first sign that a person is autistic is when he speaks or when he won’t make eye contact.

 

Maybe some of the physical characteristics of autism could be classified as repetitive or stereotypical movements, for example finger flicking, hitting their desks, or tapping a pencils.

 

While these actions in themselves aren’t an indication of autism, if the action is repetitive to the point of annoyance for those around them, with the person being oblivious to the irritation they have become to others.


Some of the more common signs of autism are:

 

* Poor upper body strength

* Low facial muscle tone

* Sometimes pale skin

* Repetitive stereotypical movements, such as head banging, finger   flicking, rocking etc.

* Impaired motor skills (motor and fine)

 

Research continues into this complex disorder, there are some rough guidelines established for identifying the physical characteristics and behaviors that could indicate the possibility of autism.

 

These are by no means complete lists and in all cases if autism is suspected a diagnosis of autism should be sought from a professional such as the child’s G.P. who will be able to advise you on the possibility of autism and refer you on to a specialist.

 

Other signs of autism in preschool children can include:


  • Shying away from physical closeness or cuddles
  • Treating people in the same manner as objects
  • Either lack of crying or excessive crying
  • Repetitive stereotypical movements or obsessive play with one item or toy
  • The need for routine without exception

 

After a diagnosis of autism there are specific treatments that can help with the symptoms of autism such as lack of verbal and non-verbal communication skills and social, imagination and interaction skills deficits.

 

One treatments used for almost twenty years by parents of autistic kids is social stories. Designed by therapist Carol Gray they were first introduced to help parents of autistic kids and professionals involved with the care and well being of autistic children to teach them appropriate social skills and behaviors.


Since there first introduction social stories have evolved into one of the major tools used for teaching social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to autistic children. They use visual representations and appropriate text to describe in detail giving key focus to the social cues the autistic child needs to learn the skill or behavior being mastered.

 

Parents of autistic kids and professionals such as teachers use social stories widely to help autistic children find clarity, learn and re-enforce vital, everyday and occasional skills they struggle to master or understand.

 

For example, tooth brushing, using the toilet or learning what is death, birth, a wedding or other skills such as claming down, asking questions and making friends.


To understand more about how social stories can help alleviate the symptoms of autism associated with the physical characteristics and behaviors of autism and develop vital social and communication skills for your autistic child visit one of the following sites:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to the autism child ? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.


There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills and choose from various titles.