Posts Tagged ‘communication difficulties’

Communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social deficiencies these are familiar to autism; it is due to these social deficiencies that the autistic child may be unaware of the rules of social conduct, how to act in public or interactions. Even though all autistic individuals have social deficiencies the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

Having social deficiencies is familiar to autism and at times can leave the autistic child open to bullying especially at school.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language can also cause problems.

 

Generally kids with autism that display communication difficulties will misunderstand simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally. For example; metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “watch what you say”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to their social deficiencies sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However using management tactics of autism for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be beneficial.

 

There are many management tactics of autism available with social skills stories being probably the most significant for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are used effectively by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to help improve and teach social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours as well as addressing communication difficulties in children with autism.

 

Social skills stories are management tactics of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

Social skills stories help overcome social deficiencies by communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, by helping the child with autism learn appropriate social skills and behaviours.

 

The social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan detailing the key points or goals, allowing them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with and less likely to become stressed or agitated.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for communication struggles in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Students with ASD social supports

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

The main characteristics of autism spectrum disorder ARE social awareness deficits, communication difficulties and imagination deficits, as well as some sensory processing issues and obsessive behaviours.

Typically most children on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, this meas that they think in pictures/images and tend to use speech/language as a secondary tool.

So how CAN this knowledge help us with finding students with ASD social supports?

There ARE a wide variety of supports and tools for autism spectrum disorder, typically the most significant supports and tools for autism WILL be those which ARE visual, for example, PECS, communication picture cards (flash cards), social skills stories and visual social story cards.

For many students with ASD school can be confusing at times and quite chaotic. Typically children on the spectrum like set patterns and routines and WILL dislike any changes to routines or suprises, they WILL PREFER things to remain on an even level.

Therefore most students with autism WILL find particular times of the school day such as recess, break time, PE etc confusing. Using social supports like social stories and communication picture cards CAN help them to cope with and be more setteled during these times of the day.

Social stories ARE short descriptive stories relating to a skill, activity, event, behaviour etc that the child with autism spectrum disorder finds difficult. The social story can act like a visual framework or step by step plan detailing visually what is happening and expected of them.

Social stories and communication picture cards ARE excellent supports and tools for autism to use in and around the classroom and school, they ARE also excellent for at home and ALL other areas the child with autism finds difficult. Using first person text, always from the perspective of the child, the social story uses images/pictures to describe the situtation or skill in a manner the student with autism can better understand.

To learn mre about social stories and picture communication cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school
Alternativelly visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Autism Spectrum Syndrome disability

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Autism Spectrum Syndrome disability

 

Autism Spectrum Syndrome disability is unfortunately misunderstood. The term autism spectrum disorder is an umbrella term used to cover a wide range of conditions. It is believed that around 25% of people with ASD will have accompanying learning disabilities.  Regardless of functioning, typically all people with an Autism Spectrum Syndrome disability will almost certainly have difficulties with social skills, imagination skills, behaviors and display communication difficulties, this is often called the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

Autism Spectrum Syndrome is a life-long condition that is either present from birth or from early childhood.

Listed below are a few of the autism characteristics that may be present in children with autism. However, typically those with high functioning autism or Asperger syndrome may only display a few of the autism characteristics listed behaviors while others on the lower end of the autism scale may display all the behaviors.

Having Autism Spectrum Disorder can mean:

  • Being unable to cope appropriately with social situations.
  • Self-stimulating behavior, often referred to as “stimming” this can include behaviors such as: flicking fingers, flapping arms, rocking back and forth and in some cases self-injury like head banging or slapping.
  • Communication difficulties – this can include asking questions, joining in conversations an finding appropriate topics of conversation.
  • Obsessions with certain facts or objects; for example timetables.
  • Asking questions they already know answers to.
  • Obsession with a routine that if broken may cause distress, this is a known area of weakness in children with autism
  • Difficulty forming relationships with others –  making friends can be difficult for children on the spectrum
  • Misunderstanding people’s feelings and emotions – difficulties with “mind reading” or reading peoples facial expression and body language is lacking in children on the spectrum
  • Problems with creativity and imagination are also a cause for concern in children on the spectrum. Typically children with autism are not spontaneous and will struggle with make believe and spontaneity preferring rigid learnt responses.
  • Typically many children on the spectrum will have a short concentration span.

Many autistic people are naturally gifted in certain areas, many autistic people are extremely gifted when using their hands constructing, painting and in music.

Those individuals with Asperger syndrome tend to be on the higher end of the autism scale. This set of individuals with Aspeger syndrome are generally average or above average intelligence.  Those individuals on the lower end of the autism scale may also display learning disabilities, this set of individuals may have poor communication skills and in many cases language may never develop.

In the classroom typically a student with autistic spectrum disorder may have difficulties forming social relationships and following school rules. This can cause issues within the classroom for teachers and other students. A student with autistic spectrum disorder may need extra support in school to help them cope. This help can come in the form of visual intervention strategies like: PECS, visual support cards, flash cards, social skills stories, visual timetables, now and next boards and so on…

Looking into what is Asperger Syndrome?
What is Asperger Syndrome?

Asperger syndrome has been described as “high functioning Autism.”
People with Asperger Syndrome will generally not have any learning disability. In many cases a child with Asperger Syndrome may not receive a diagnosis until they are older. Unlike a diagnosis of autism which is generally given before the child reaches three years of age. Indeed some people can go through their whole lives having Asperger Syndrome and not receive a diagnosis, until they are in their 40’s or older.

Asperger syndrome was first identified by Hans Asperger in the 1940’s; some of the characteristics of Asperger syndrome are:

  • Lack of empathy
  • Naive, inappropriate one sided interactions
  • Little or no ability to form friendships
  • Pedantic or repetitive speech
  • Poor non verbal communication
  • Intense absorption in certain subjects
  • Clumsy and ill coordinated movements and odd postures.

It is also apparent that those individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome also display the triad of autistic impairments – social skills deficits, as with individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

  • Social communication: knowing what to say to other people and understanding what they are saying to you.
  • Social understanding: knowing what to do when you are with others or behaving inappropriately (apparently oblivious to social rules).
  • Imagination: pretend play, make believe and fantasy.

People with Asperger’s Syndrome will generally fulfill their potential and may go on to university, have a job and live a relatively “normal” life, get married and have a family.

 Overcoming the triad of autistic impairment – social skills deficits can be as difficult for the individual with Asperger’s as it can be for those individuals with mild an lower functioning autism

Therefore overcoming social skills deficits can become a primary focus for all people with ASD and their families. Overcoming social skills deficits can be achieved using autism supports like visual intervention strategies such as social skills stories and visual support cards.

 Looking at visual intervention strategies – autism supports

 Generally people with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think and learn in pictures. Consequently, visual intervention strategies are beneficial because they use visual means of communication, such as images, pictures, graphs and so on.

 An individual on the spectrum will be better able to understand and follow instruction and information when it is presented visually, rather than written or oral command. Strategies such as social stories use visual images along with appropriate first person text to explain a situation or skill that the individual on the spectrum is struggling with.

 For example: Autism and making friends, generally children on the spectrum struggle to make and maintain friendships. A social story can act as a role model or step by step plan showing children on the spectrum the social rules they are expected to follow when attempting to make friends, like for example how to approach another child, how to start a conversation and so on…

For many children with autism social stories are a life line, helping them overcome many difficulties. Many parents trust social stories to help them overcome hurdles such as puberty, relationships, and transitions etc…

 Social skills stories can answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others this is a marked area of weakness for many children with autism.

 Generally social skills stories are in word format making them easy to edit, no two individuals with autism are ever the same and we all use different terminology, therefore social stories need to be editable. They should also be easy to print making them portable and convenient to use anywhere and anytime.

 To learn more about social skills stories and how they benefit children with Autism Spectrum Syndrome disability, as well as other autism supports like visual support cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Autism products and resources

Thursday, February 3rd, 2011

Do you have a child with special needs such as Autism Spectrum Disorder?

 

Do you need information on or for your child with special needs? Resources; safety equipment, soothing music even toys or games

 

In our well equipped autism store (with many featured amazon products) you will find plenty of autism products to suit every pocket and need all ready and waiting to be shipped or packaged off to you.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a complex disorder, affecting how the individual thinks, acts, communicates and behaves. This is due to social skills deficits which are always present in individuals with autism. 

 

There is no cure for autism but there are treatments for autism and autism products available to you which can help treat the symptoms of autism – social skills deficits, making life a whole lot easier!

 

One of the primary treatments for autism is: social skills stories Developed twenty years ago social skills stories excellent at helping with the symptoms of autism, used to help pave the way for positive behaviours, teach new skills, aid communication difficulties, help with transitions, changes to routines, unexpected occurrences and help autistic children see things from another persons perspective.

 

For many parents with autistic children finding autism resources and products as well as treatments for autism is difficult, but we think we have found the solution here at autismsocialstories.com

 

Our NEW Autism E-Store has just opened full of wonderful autism resources and products like: autism books, autism educational resources, autism clothing and accessories, soothing music, toys and games, as well as other autism resources such as safety equipment, video games, baby goods, e-books,  children’s books, health products and much more…

 

There are various treatments for autism available at autismsocialstories.com like visual support cards: Used to help with communication difficulties as well as teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours. Visual support cards can be used for visual schedules, now and next boards, choosing boards as well as reminders for things such as snack time, toilet time, hometime and so on…

 

There is no cure for autism, but life has just got a whole lot easier; with autism products like: autism books, autism educational resources, autism clothing and so on…

 

Whatever you need is all in one convenient place at autismsocialstories.com find our treatments for autism and autism products and autism resources all in one place.

 

For individuals with autism life can be stressful, sensory processing issues can affect an individuals sense of self as well as the other senses: sight, sound, touch, taste and smell by using treatments for autism like social skills stories, visual support cards and other autism products in our autism store you can help your child with autism deal with issues like sensory processing issues, as well as any other issues and troubles which can arise.

 

To take a look inside autismsocialstoreis.com and the NEW autism e-store visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com for the NEW Autism E-Store click the tab at the top of the page Autism E-Store

 

See you there!

Social and communication difficulties in children with Autism

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

All children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social impairments this is common to autism. It is these social impairments that cause social and communication difficulties in children with Autism.

 

Even though all autistic individuals have social impairments the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language is also problematic.

 

For example: kids with autism display communication difficulties such as; misunderstanding simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally, like metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “wait a minute”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to social impairments sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that the autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments in the autistic child, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However there are treatments of autism which address social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder such as visual support cards and social stories.

 

Probably one of the major treatments of autism available is social skills stories, used widely by parents, care givers teachers and other professionals as a positive Intervention strategy excellent for addressing social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are an Intervention strategy which can be implemented and used for situations such as changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and pave the way for positive behaviours…

 

Social skills stories are treatments of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

A social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan a role model answering the key “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. A social skills story will give the key points, allowing the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with, thus reducing stress.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for addressing social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Social stories were first developed round twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray. To aid the communication difficulties she was having with the autistic students she worked with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder have problems in three main areas of development: Social interaction skills, they may struggle to make friends, understand the unspoken rules of social interaction, be unable to recognise social cues and signals, not respect personal space and display at times weird or odd behaviours, many autistic students fail to understand school and class rules.

 

Communication difficulties with both verbal (spoken) language and non-verbal communication; For example gestures, sign language, reading or interpreting body language and facial expression.

 

AS well as imagination skills, children with autism spectrum disorder live in a very literal world and find make believe hard to understand a child with autism will also struggle with humour, pretend play. They may also display obsessive behaviours and fail to recognise or indeed understand why others may not share their interest.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder aim to HELP address these social skills deficits. All autistic children will have some or all of the above social skills deficits with varying degrees of severity dependant on where the child with autism falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE implemented to help with various skills and situations the child on the autism spectrum is struggling with for example making friends, washing their teeth, coping with recess, respecting personal space and so on.

 

Written in first person language in a consistent manner social stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give the child on the autism spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and actions of others.

 

Normally following a set pattern of sentence type a social story WILL act as a role model or VISUAL PLAN of the skill or situation.

 

We know children on the spectrum ARE mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, a good social story will follow this concept and USE visual images or pictures to show visually the skill or situation being taught or encouraged.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder should be editable because we all use different terminology with our own child, they should be easy to personalize making them suitable for all ages and abilities.

 

To learn more about how social  skills stories can be implemented and to gain access to over 100 social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties

Monday, November 1st, 2010

Children with autistic spectrum disorder will have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age or ability; this is thought to be due to the “triad of impairments” which are common to autism.

 

What is the triad of impairments?

 

Are social skills deficits in three main areas, social skills, communication skills and imagination skills; all children with autistic spectrum disorder will have varying degrees of social skills deficits.

 

Methods of addressing autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties in communication skills.

 

All children with an autistic spectrum disorder experience communication difficulties. Although language itself may not be affected the way the child expresses themselves and uses language will almost certainly be affected. As will the way the child uses non-verbal language such as gestures and signals.

 

For many children with an autistic spectrum disorder understanding language is problematic and is one of the major causes of autistic behavioural difficulties.

 

Imagine being dropped in a foreign land with no means of communication, where everybody talked in a way you could not totally understand, this is what it can be like to be autistic and have communication difficulties.

 

What we do know for certain is that the vast majority of autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think and digest information easier if the information is visual.

 

Therefore, visual strategies which can enable autistic children to understand what is happening around them, what is expected of them or that they can use to express themselves should always be visual.

 

With autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties the most common visual strategies used are social skills stories, PECS, flash cards and other visual strategies such as visual timetables, choices boards and mini schedules etc.

 

Developed twenty years ago social skills stories ARE a major tool for autism that can be implemented and used to address many social skills deficits.

 

Social stories are a major tool for autism which needs no formal training to use, can be edited and personalized.

 

A social skills story is a simple description using first person text and visual images or pictures of an everyday social situation, activity or event shown visually from the child’s perspective, much like a visual plan or framework and acting as a role model to the autistic child.

 

For example, a social skills story can be used to help an autistic child prepare for upcoming changes to routines, or learn appropriate social interactions for situations that they encounter.

 

The goal of the social skills story is to give the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill, change to routine or behaviour making them feel more relaxed and less anxious. Then, when the situation actually happens, the autistic child can use the story to help guide his or her behaviour.

 

Research shows that using social stories can have a positive affect on autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties, giving simple and clear descriptions of social cues and appropriate behaviours.

 

Generally social skills stories should follow a set pattern of sentence type. All social skills stories should be flexible and be editable, as we all use different language and expressions.

 

To learn more about how social stories can help address autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Communication difficulties in child with autism

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Common to individuals with autism are social skills deficits. Having social skills deficits can make communication difficult for a child with autism.

As typical beings we communicate both verbally and non-verbally daily. Communication is a major skill, we naturally learn. For individuals with autism however the ability to communicate is affected, having ASD can make an individual react and interact in a very different manner to typically developing beings.

For a child with an ASD expressing their needs or wants, can quite often be misunderstood. For example: In the classroom; A child with autism may not typically ask for a drink when they are thirsty, they may for example snatch the drink from another person, simply take the drink without asking or maybe they will shout out etc., this is typical to autism.

 

Normally all adverse autistic behaviour will happen for a reason an internal or external factor, not simply out of mischief or the desire to be awkward or naughty.

Research shows us autistic children are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching or caring for a child with autism it is usually best to use visual tools and supports when you are trying to get information across or tackle an adverse autistic behaviour. 

 

Research shows a child with autism will be less confused when the information presented to them is visual.

Understandably many teachers especially those teaching in mainstream education are little prepared to teach a child with autism. The English language is predominantly verbal, and this is the main focus in mainstream education. However with an autistic student this method of teaching is not always going to be affective.

With a poor attention span and communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication the autistic student may struggle with lessons which are primarily verbal or written.

A lack social skills and communication difficulties can make it problematic for autistic children to make and maintain friendships, and generally “fit in” socially.

Using visual support tools for autism such as social stories; WILL help to improve communication difficulties in a child with autism.

Using visual supports tools for autism within the classroom and at home can help the child with an ASD focus on the skill or situation that they are struggling with. A social skills story can show the child with an ASD a visual step by step plan or framework of what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) helping the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, the social story has now evolved into a significant tool used by parents and teachers to help them improve communication difficulties and social skills in their child with autism.

To find out more about social stories and how they help improve communication difficulties in a child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other sites offering social stories to improve social and communication skills for the autistic student can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources