Posts Tagged ‘children with autism spectrum’

Simple yet very effective social stories

Monday, November 11th, 2013

Simple yet very effective social stories

 

Autism Social Stories are short visually rich simple descriptions of an everyday social situation. The autism social story is written from the perspective of the child with autism.

 

Simple yet very effective social stories can help a child prepare for upcoming changes to routine, help the child with autism spectrum cope with social interactions, teach communication and play skills, as well as help with behaviors.

 

These simple yet very effective autism social stories are written in the first person, in the present tense, and from the point of view of the autistic child.

 

First introduced almost twenty years ago simple yet very effective social stories were introduced to help improve social and communication skills in children with autism spectrum. 

 

By giving the child with autism spectrum clear descriptions, prompts, social cues and behaviors to help them learn social and communication skills they may otherwise struggle to conquer or find stressful.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum are visual learners and find visual representations of the social skills easier to understand; therefore using simple yet very effective social stories is an advantage.

 

Autism Social Stories provide the child with autism spectrum specific social cues, prompts and behaviors, allowing them to learn social, communication, interaction and imagination skills effectively.

 

Recent research studies show that simple social stories can help reduce problem behaviors, increase social awareness, and teach new skills.

 

To learn more about how autism social stories can help your autistic child and to gain immediate download visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Generally autism social stories are written by experts in autism and can be implemented to help parents; teachers and other professionals teach all social and communication skills and behaviors the child with autism spectrum is struggling to master. Get downloads of simple yet vet effective social stories from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Communication objectives for children with autism

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

For the majority of us our speech and language develops during the first three years of our lives.

 

However this is not the case in children with autism spectrum. Experts believe that the difficulties in speech and language development that are almost always present in individuals with autism are due to a variety of reasons occurring before, during or after birth. It is because of the autistic person’s lack of speech and language skills that they find it difficult to interact with the world around them effectively.

 

As with typically developing children no two autistic individuals are ever going to be the same, therefore the degree of communication problems will vary. Most autistic individuals have difficulty understanding and using language, as well as problems with word and sentence meaning, intonation, and rhythm.

 

Many children with autism spectrum use echolalia, a repetition of something previously heard. For example with immediate echolalia the autistic individual will repeat a question like “Do you want something to drink?” instead of replying with a “yes” or “no.” With delayed echolalia the autistic individual may say “Do you want something to eat?” when they are asking for food.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum have difficulties with eye contact and attention span and are often unable to use gestures for example pointing, sign language and to assist verbal communication.

 

Therefore many parents, care givers and teachers believe Communication objectives for children with autism should be made a priority.

 

There are various treatments and methods available for helping to encourage affective communication in children with autism, things like visual aids for autism, PECS and autism social stories. These help the child with autism understand and cope with communication and social skills they struggle with like asking questions, taking turns, sharing, making friends as well as other skills such as following school rules, recess etc.

 

Research into Communication objectives for children with autism shows autism social skills stories are an effective tool for teaching communication skills.

 

These short descriptive, visual stories are used to help the child with autism understand and manage communication and social difficulties. Developed almost twenty years ago the autism social skills stories  are much like a step by step visual plan describing visually the skill being taught or mastered, showing the what, why, where and when helping the child with autism feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

You can instantly download autism social skills stories for any child with autism that have been expertly written, following the recommended formula, from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or from sites such as:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

ASD intervention tactics

Monday, October 14th, 2013

There are various intervention strategies for children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects how the individual; processes information, thinks, socially interacts, communicates and behaves.

The symptoms of autism vary between individuals, however all kids with autism will have social skills impairments: Deficits in social skills affects the child’s social interaction skills, will cause communication difficulties, and difficulties with imagination as well as sensory processing issues.

It is often noted that kids with autism live in a very literal world often referred to as “Autism Own World”.

Intervention strategies are used to help overcome social skills impairments and pave the way to positive behaviours.

Intervention strategies like autistic social skills stories are used to help with situations and skills like: transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, hygiene issues, communication difficulties, social interaction deficits and HELP pave the way to positive behaviours.

Children with autism spectrum tend to prefer structure and routines and dislike changes. Many children with ASD struggle to find and maintain friendships with their peers.

Understanding your autistic child is difficult, ASD intervention tactics ARE designed to HELP you teach and re-enforce social and communication skills and behaviours. ASD intervention tactics can make the difference in helping your autistic child reach his or her full potential

ASD intervention tactics help the ASD child understand the world they live in, probably them most popular strategy is autistic social skills stories.

Autistic social skills stories are short descriptive pieces of text normally written in first person text and from the autistic child’s own point of view.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is being diagnosed far more these days. Research into pervasive developmental disorder has suggested that using visual support tools such as autism social stories has impacted on the lives and families of those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder such as ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder)

Research suggests the vast majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures, making autism social stories the ideal intervention strategy to use.

Autistic social skill stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

ASD intervention tactics such as autism social stories are used for all situations and activities the ASD child may be confused by or struggling with, for example: Going to the dentist, making friends, play, a new car, brushing their hair and so on.

For immediate download of autism social stories for children with ASD visit: www.autismsocialstories.com

Or alternatively visit any of the following sites for more information and social stories.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Autism social stories are a visual autism tool used to help teach and implement social skills to children with autism spectrum.

 

Autism social stories provide the person on the autism spectrum an explanation and visual framework of the skill or situation that they may find difficult or confusing.

 

Research shows that Autistic social stories are an excellent visual autism tool which can be used to help reduce stress and inappropriate behaviours in some children with an ASD. The autistic social skills story also increases social understanding and has been reported as a good approach for helping children with an ASD to reach their full potential.

 

The goal of a autistic social skills story is to increase the autistic child’s understanding of skills and social situations they are struggling to master and understand. By making the child with an ASD more comfortable with and in the situation, and suggest possible responses they may receive from others.

 

Autism social skills stories follow specific sentence types: descriptive, perspective, directive and control. Introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, social stories have grown into a very popular visual strategy that can be used with all autistic individuals regardless of age and ability.

 

Generally autistic social skills stories are written by experts, teachers and parents to help teach social and communication skills to autistic individuals. Autism social stories can be edited to suit all needs, personalized, printed and are portable making them convenient and easy to use.

 

An autistic social skills story can be introduced to help deal with any situation or skill that the child on the autism spectrum needs help with. No formal training is needed to use social skills stories, site which offer support and expertly written social stories can be found using search engines such as Google.

 

Sites that offer Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum like http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer support and downloads of autistic social skills stories for various situations and skills for a small fee.

 

An autistic social skills story should be visual and use first person text, like a role model the social skills story will help with transitions, and changes to routines as well as teach and support social skills and communication difficulties.

 

For more information on this visual strategy visit any of the following sites and find Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

 

 

 

CONQUERING social skills issues in children with autism

Friday, May 10th, 2013

Children with autism spectrum do not develop socially in the same manner as typically developing children. ASD (Autism spectrum disorder) is a neurological disorder affecting the way an individual’s brain develops.  

 

Children with an ASD have difficulty making friends and getting on well with their peers.

 

A child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is far more likely to enjoy unusual interests not shared by their peers, for example an obsession with train timetables, clock mechanisms etc. This can in some cases cause the child to become socially isolated and unable to integrate fully with their peers.

 

All children with autism spectrum will have social skills impairments . However the individual’s social skills impairments will vary between children as no two kids will ever be exactly the same.

 

Having social skills impairments can make it hard for children with autism spectrum to understand how other children are feeling, their emotions, they will be unable to read the other child’s body language or facial expression.

 

Conquering social skills issues in children with autism spectrum can be difficult. However with time and perseverance, as well as autism supports like autism social skills stories  this can be achieved.

 

What are autism social skills stories?

 

A social skills story is a short story that has been written in a specific style and format. A social skills story gives information through visual images and text, providing clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.

 

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what. Showing visually what people do and why they do it, like a role model for the child with autism. This can help relieve anxieties and stress that can surround some social situations, for example making friends, asking questions, sharing, taking turns even respecting personal space, in-fact most social and communications difficulties can be addressed using autism social skills stories .

 

In fact the social skills story acts as a prompt for socially acceptable behaviours and can help the child with autism spectrum understand situations and skills and show them appropriate responses.

 

The social skills story can help children with autism spectrum prepare for routine changes and new situations, which can help reduce negative reactions and behaviours which stem from a lack of social understanding.

 

Conquering social skills issues in children with autism spectrum using autism social skills stories  has already proven successful, today social stories are considered one of the major autism supports and are widely used in homes, schools, colleges and out and about.

 

To learn more about autism supports such as autism social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Where you will also find a vast selection of autism social skills stories  which can be downloaded.

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Autistic social skills

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties for children with autism spectrum is a lack of social awareness skills and behaviours, which is referred to as social skills deficits

These deficits ARE made worse due to deficits with communication both verbal and non-verbal. However there are various treatments of autism that CAN help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their own social skills deficits.

Typically developing children WILL learn social awareness skills through observation, peers, family and their environment. This is NOT TRUE for a child on the spectrum this is due to the “theory of mind” a child with autism WILL NOT be able to read another person’s facial expression or body language.

This lack of the theory of mind WILL mean that the child with autism WILL have difficulties determining what is happening the” hidden social rules” which CAN lead to social mistakes and at times even isolation.

There is no cure for autism but the various treatments of autism CAN and WILL help OVERCOME many of the skills your child is struggling with.

Probably one of the most significant treatments of autism is autistic social skills stories which ARE used to help children with autism spectrum understand and learn skills and behaviours that ARE causing them stress or confusion, like for example self-help skills, asking questions, making friends and so on…

Typically autistic social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text that ARE written in first person text and ALWAYS from the autistic individual’s point of view.

Commonly children with autism spectrum ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they find VISUAL information much easier to use and UNDERSTAND.

Autistic social skills stories ARE VISUAL, the social story USES images /pictures to detail the skill or behaviour in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story acts like a VISUAL FRAMEWORK OR PLAN of the skill or situation helping to make the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

It should also answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and should offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

To learn more about autistic social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Social awareness skills ARE not naturally learnt by young people with autism, unlike their typically developing peers children with autism DO NOT people watch and lack the ability to naturally learn skills the rest of us take for granted.

Many young people with autism struggle with friendships and find social interaction difficult to master this can lead to misunderstandings and at times social isolation.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies like social stories, flash cards, PECS and so on…

Using Intervention Strategies is beneficial and has been prove effective. Typically children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in images and pictures and will use speech/language as secondary.

This means that Visual Intervention Strategies WILL be far easier for them to understand. Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories need NO formal training to use and can be implemented easily.

The autism social story is a short descriptive piece of text that is specifically written to help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum. The autism social story USES visual images/pictures to describe the skill or situation from the autistic child’s own perspective.

It WILL act like a visual plan of framework of the skill or situation, helping children with autism to feel more comfortable with and in the situation, giving them the opportunity to understand what is expected of them and what in return they CAN expect from others.

The autism social story will help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism using flash cards…

Flash cards ARE small laminated cards with images/pictures printed onto the front of them, some also have small amounts of text. The cards CAN be used as an exchange – for example at snack time the card CAN be given to the teacher in exchange for what is printed onto the front of the card – an apple for example and so on…

Flash cards ARE an excellent means of communication they are also useful around the classroom showing where the bathroom is, the pencil tray and so on… The flash card is also used on visual timetables, now and then boards, choices boards and other means of communication.

To learn more and see examples of autism social stories and flash cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Communication Difficulties in Autism

Thursday, January 26th, 2012

Looking at Communication Difficulties in Autism - USING VISUAL SUPPORTS

Children with autism have difficulties with communication skills, and will often not develop effective communication . It is believed that up to 50% of children with autism spectrum will NOT develop speech, while others will develop speech slowly.

When we think of speech we are thinking of the body of words and the formation of sounds, as well as the structure and forms used to allow speech.

However with  communication this can be either verbally through speech or non-verbally through gestures, signs and pointing to printed words or symbols.

Typically children with autism spectrum WILL struggle with all forms of communication verbal and non-verbal and will use speech as a secondary language. Children with autism spectrum ARE generally VISUAL thinkers this means that they
think in pictures / images, this is their first language.

It is therefore beneficial for teacher and parents to consider visual information as a means of communication and use speech / words less. Visual communication supports for autism can be in many forms - social stories, visual social story cards,
PECS, flash cards, visual timetables and so on.

As children develop they begin to explore their environment and learn cause and affect - for example a thirsty child may point to his cup, a tired child may raise their arms to be picked up, this is cause and affect.  This inquisitiveness for exploration to learn this cause and affect is typically missing in children with autism.

By the time a non-verbal autistic child starts school chances are they will already have been seen by a  speech therapist. In many cases it will be necessary for the autistic child to learn a new form of communication -  a child that screams and tantrums to
get what they need is not going to “fit in” at school. A new means of communication will be needed to control the need for the screaming - for example visual communication supports for autism such as visual social story cards, PECS and flash cards can be introduced.

Visual social story cards are small laminated cards approx. 8cm by 11cm that can be introduced to help the child learn new skills or understand behaviours that they find difficult to master, for example break time, using the potty, time out and so on.

The social story cards are short visual stories much like a comic script that are used as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behaviour, always from the autistic child’s own perspective and in first person text. The social story cards will describe the skill or behaviour and give possible outcomes.

Visual social story cards answer the “wh” questions - who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and provide an insight into how others may be feeling, which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

To learn more about how social stories can be used to help autisitic children and communication difficulties in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

How do I choose a social story for my autistic child?

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

I often get asked How do I choose a social story for my autistic child?

To begin with you need to understand what a social story is:

Social stories are short visual descriptions of a skill, behaviour, activity or event, written in first person text and always from the autistic child’s own perspective.

Social stories are written to help the child with autism develop social awareness skills and behaviours as well as social understanding, and better communication skills.

A social skills story can also help the child with autism better understand that not everyone shares their opinions, likes and dislikes and that we all have different objectives, thoughts and feelings.

The social skills story is generally written in word format and can be adapted to suit all needs and abilities. It should also be easy to edit and personalize, as no two individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our children.

Typically children with autism spectrum are visual thinkers, meaning that they think in pictures and use language as a secondary.

This makes social stories ideal as they ARE predominantly visual and colourful.

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions - who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into how another person may precieve the situation, their emotion and feelings, this is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

Acting as a visual framework or plan the social story can help giude the autistic child, suggesting possible responses and outcomes, promoting positive behaviours.

Social stories and visual social story cards ARE used for ALL situations and skills that the child with autism is struggling with, for example: asking other kids to play, waiting their turn to talk in the classroom, recess, being a good sport and so on.

Many parents find social stories and visual social story cards an excellent tool around puberty, by helping to explain what is happening and what the child / adolescent can expect.

Through observation you should be able to determine which skills and behavours your child is finding challenging and implement an appropriate social story. However if you do not see any improvement after two weeks maybe the story needs tweaking, or perhaps you have read the situation wrong and a different story is needed.

For example a child that has a tamtrum during circle time, may not be having a meltdown due to circle time itself, there could be a number of reasons, such as not getting to show and tell first to, who they are sitting next to. Through observation you should be able to determine the cause of the tantrum and introduce an appropriate story.
To lean more  - How do I choose a social story for my autistic child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Christmas and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thursday, November 24th, 2011

For many children on the autism spectrum Christmas may be a time for stress and anxiety, with the on-going chaos and sensory overload the Festive Season provides.

However there are strategies that parents of autistic children can put in place to help their child cope.

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers and learners; this means that they use speech/language secondary and visual information as a primary means of communication.

So how does this help us at Christmas!

Generally for children on the autism spectrum Christmas is unpredictable, and it is this unpredictability that CAN cause the most distress.  

Using VISUAL autistic supports can help.

Characteristically children with autism spectrum disorder prefer structure and routines and dislike changes. Visual autistic supports CAN help balance the unpredictability of Christmas and make the Festive Season more predictable and structured.

Commonly parents of autistic children struggle to find suitable supports for Christmas and autism spectrum disorder. However, the internet NOW makes it a lot easier for parents to source suitable information and autism supports.

Using autism supports for Christmas

 

Visual Timetables:  Can be used to show a count-down to Christmas, the visual timetable can be used to help the child with ASD visually see what is happening each day on the run up to Christmas, for example buying the tree, putting up the tree, decorating the house, a school play, party and so on.

Photos:  Show your child with ASD photographs of last year and how you celebrated to remind them of how the Festive Season is going to be.

Visual Social Story Cards:  Can be introduced to help the child with ASD deal with changes to routines, learning new skills and coping with unpredictability. Visual social story cards ARE small laminated story cards which act like a framework of a skill or situation for example the school play. The story card can help the child to understand what is happening and what is expected of them.

Autism social skills stories:  Probably the most significant of the autism supports for Christmas. Autism social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “ HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social skills story is a short descriptive story from the autistic child’s point of view which uses visual images to show how and why something is happening and how the autistic child can deal with this, as well as what other people will be expecting of them.

Visual flash cards - PECS:  These can be used to help communication difficulties during the festive season.

There are of cause other visual autistic supports that can be sourced on  the internet.

Christmas need not be too stressful once the right visual autistic supports are put in place. To find suitable autistic supports like: Autism social skills stories for Christmas as well as visual social story cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

These Autism social skills stories for Christmas CAN be edited, personalized, downloaded and printed for convenience.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

Behaviour Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Autism is a lifelong neurological disorder, which is generally diagnosed before the child
reaches their third birthday.

What are the behaviour characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder…The main characteristics
of autism spectrum disorder are the individual’s deficits in social,
communication both verbal and non-verbal as well as imagination skills.

If you are the parent or teacher of a child on the autism spectrum and are looking for
methods and treatments for autism then read on…

There is “no cure for autism” but there are some very good methods and treatments for autism
which can have a massive impact on your child’s life and help them reach
his/her full potential, as well as deal with their social, communication and
imagination skills deficits.

Some of the treatments for autism available include:

ABA

PECS’s
communication boards

Social Skills Stories

Visual support cards

For the purpose of this article we will be looking at social skills stories and visual support cards.

What are social skills stories?

So what are social skills stories – Quite often you will come across various names for
social skills stories like: autism social stories, social stories and so on,
but whatever you call them they are all relatively similar.

A social skills story will normally follow a formula first defined about twenty years
ago by therapist Carol Gray, to help her communicate with the autistic children
she was caring for. The formula consists of four sentence types

Descriptive

Directive

Perspective

Control

Social skills stories are used to help teach autistic children and adults to overcome
any social skills deficits.

Typically all individuals with an ASD will have deficits in social, communication and
imagination skills, this is a common symptom of autism.

For example a child on the spectrum may have difficulties with following social rules such
as sharing, taking turns, making friends, respecting personal space, having a
conversation, asking questions and so on. Using a social skills story will help
the child on the autism spectrum overcome their difficulties

A parent or teacher of a child on the spectrum can easily implement social stories to help
their child cope with even everyday life skills like using the bathroom and recess;
in-fact social stories have many uses.

What do social stories look like?

A social story is generally written in first person text, using appropriate language and
always from the autistic person’s point of view.

Typically autism social stories are visual.

Generally children with autism tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in
pictures. Therefore it is beneficial to use visual intervention strategies such
as social stories.

Using images and text the social skills story acts as a role model or visual step by step plan
describing the situation or skill in terms of relevant social cues. Answering
the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW”
and giving an insight in to the thoughts and feelings of others which is a
marked area of weakness in most children with autism.

Example of autism social story

Emily has difficulties with sharing and will display inappropriate behaviours and
tantrums.

So looking at an example of autism social story for Emily; Emily’s main problem is
tantrums when she does not get her own way…

Therefore we would start a story for Emily giving focus to the key points…

Line one: My name is Emily I am six years of age; (This is a descriptive sentence, it is
describing who the story is about in this case Emily).

A small image maybe added here or an actual photo showing Emily.

Line two: Every day I like to play with the toys in the classroom; (This is also descriptive,
it describes what Emily likes to do, in this case playing with the toys in the
classroom).

Again another image or small photo of Emily is added. The image or photo could be of Emily in
the classroom playing with the toys etc.

And this is how the story is built up; the next two sentences would be perspective
sentences.

Again with appropriate images or pictures, and slowly the story starts to take shape.

There is no need for any formal teaching to use social stories.

All autism social stories should be editable, we all use different terminology and no two
children are the same. Therefore it is really important that parents and
teachers are able to edit the social story to make it relevant to their own
child on the spectrum.

You can learn more about social stories and how they are used, as well as get downloads
of social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Visual support cards

Another great autism resource is visual support cards. Similar to social stories the
visual support cards can help support social and communication deficits.

For example many children on the spectrum have difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal
communication, and many children on the spectrum will never develop speech.

The visual support card is used as a means of communication. Children with autism spectrum
have difficulties with communication and can become distressed and confused relatively
quickly. It is important to remember with children on the spectrum to speak
less and use other means of communication like visual intervention strategies
such as visual support cards.

A child with an ASD can use the visual support card to help them understand what is expected
of them as well as what they are expecting of others.

For example

Teachers can use visual support cards on the student’s visual timetable, choices board even
around the classroom to label areas and objects like the toilet, pencil tray,
computers and so on helping the child with an ASD quickly identify what is
required, reducing anxiety and stress.

To learn more about visual support cards and see some examples visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

For other methods and treatments for autism like autism social stories which can have a massive
impact on the lives of children with autism spectrum and help them reach his/her full potential visit: http://www.autismsocialstories

Autistic Spectrum Disorder Signs and Symptoms

Wednesday, May 4th, 2011

Research
does suggest that the increase in recognizing the autistic spectrum disorder signs and symptoms in children, and
diagnosis of Autism spectrum syndrome
has increased.

As
with typically developing children, each
child on the spectrum
is different. And the degree and complexity of autistic symptoms will vary from child to
child.

However
all children with autistic spectrum
disorder
will generally display the following autistic signs and symptoms:

Communication problems

Social interaction problems

Imagination difficulties

Behavior issues

It
is also apparent that many children with autism spectrum can also be very sensitive to their environment; you
may hear this referred to as sensory processing issues in autism.

For
example sensory processing issues in autism may affect one or all of the senses;
bright light, noises even background noises, smell, the feel of some materials
and so are all too much to bare for some children with autism spectrum.

Sometimes
within the mainstream classroom an
autistic child
can be viewed by their normally developing peers as “odd or
weird”, which can lead to social isolation
and sometimes even bullying.

For
teachers of children with special needs, some possible considerations for the autism classroom should include visual
intervention strategies.

First
within the autism classroom…it is
important to remember that an autistic child
is more likely to be a visual learner
. Consequently, visual intervention
strategies are important, for example a visual timetable, visual support cards,
social stories and so on…

A visual timetable…will provide a child on
the spectrum with a clear precise instructions and structure as to what is
expected lessons/activities throughout the day.

Try and keep changes to routines or
lessons to a minimal
,
children with autistic spectrum disorder do not like changes.

If
possible tell your autistic student
in advance of any possible changes, to give them plenty of warning. Springing a
change on an autistic student should wherever possible be avoided.

It
would be a good idea to consider within the autism classroom a “Time out” or “Quiet spot” for use by
the autistic student when necessary. Try to avoid other children in the class
using this space if your autistic student is in there!

It is also important to remember that
children with autism spectrum do not read facial expressions or body language.
So avoid the obvious,
frown or the “shhh”. Children with autism spectrum will not be able to read
these signs.

It
is also important to remember a child on the spectrum will not understand jokes
or subtle hints and clues. You will need to think literal.

Your
autistic student may also not
interpret themselves as included when you address the class, so it is well to
remember to address them by name. The “everybody”
or “everyone”
phrases may well get lost, and the student with autism will not
naturally think that includes them.

Try
using visual intervention strategies and
clues during lessons, children with autism respond better to visual lesson
prompts.

Try
using autism social skills stories during the school day for all
occasions the autistic student is struggling with, for example PE, assembly,
asking questions, recess and so on…

Visual prompts such as autism social
skills stories provide clear structure
to situations
, skills, behaviors and transitions. The social story can act
like a role model or visual plan to help support
the student with autism.

As
well as being visual autism social skills stories also have text that can be shared
with the child on the spectrum allowing
them to understand
what is expected
of them as well as what they can expect from others. The social story answers
the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and gives
an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area
of marked weakness in most children with autistic spectrum disorder.

Typically a child on the spectrum
will struggle to follow rules
and engage in social activities; again a social story
can help overcome these difficulties.

Parents and teachers may
find it useful to explain what autism is to others before their child is labeled
“odd or weird”. Although a diagnosis of
Autism spectrum syndrome is far more common today information about autism is
not
common and many teachers find themselves inadequately prepared for
teaching a student with autism.

It can also be helpful
when explaining what autism is to
remember autism is a neurological disorder not a mental illness and affects how
the individual on the spectrum processes information, thinks and acts.

Treatments
for autism can help alleviate some of the Autistic Spectrum Disorder Signs and Symptoms

For more advice on what
autism is… and to download autism social
skills stories, and other visual intervention strategies such as visual support
cards
visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Looking into Autism communication

Thursday, April 28th, 2011

Looking into Autism communication and what it means for your child on the spectrum

All children with autism will have communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication this is a common symptom of autism.

Did you realize that up to 50 percent of children with autism may never develop speech! And that many others will only develop early communication skills.

Research shows us that autistic children rarely engage in effective communication.

Looking at communication….

When we think of speech – language we refer to the body of words, the formations of sounds, as well as the structures and forms used to construct speech. 

Communication on the other hand can occur either verbally through speech or non-verbally through the use of spoken words, gestures, signs, or by pointing to printed words or symbols.

To communicate effectively, we must firstly be able to understand why we need to communicate with others, have the desire to communicate, have somebody to communicate with, have something to communicate about, and have a means of expressing ourselves.

With typically developing children we will no doubt notice them go through some stages of communication. For example as a typically developing child grows he/she will begin to explore his/her environment and start to understand the cause and effect around them.

For example when they are thirsty they can point to the fridge or a cup…When they are wanting a cuddle or are tired they may raise both hands to picked up.

However this is not the case with a child on the spectrum. So taking a closer look into autism communication, a child with autism spectrum is rarely inquisitive, and typically will show a lack of interest in their surroundings.

A child with autism spectrum will also lack effective eye contact which will make learning communication very difficult.

By the time a non-verbal autistic child starts school, they may already have seen a speech therapist to establish a program to aid with the development of effective communication.

The speech therapist will need to determine some appropriate objectives and goals, a base level of communication will be established by carefully observing the child within the school setting. 

In certain cases it may be necessary for the child on the spectrum to learn a new form of communication. For example the child may cry or scream when they need something and this is their form of communication. But this is not going to be effective in a classroom full of children. Consequently, a new form of communication will need to be established.

Research shows us that the vast majority of both verbal and non-verbal autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, and will respond better to visual communication and information.

Consequently, visual intervention strategies should be introduced, such as visual support cards, PECS, flash cards and social skills stories. These visual intervention strategies can be used as a form of autism communication with verbal and non-verbal autistic children.

Autism social stories are short but descriptive pieces of text with appropriate pictures and images to support the story – or instruction. So for example if the new skill is to help the autistic child understand the need for quiet reading at school, the appropriate autism social story would be selected and implemented.

The autism social skills story can be used as a role model and visual step by step plan. Using images or pictures the autism social skills story will show the reason why the children are expected to be silent, who is expecting them to be silent and why, as well as the consequence of not being quiet and the consequent or reward for being quiet.

In other words the a social story gives the answers to the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will also give the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, which is a marked area of difficulty in most children with autism spectrum.

Autistic children tend to be visual learners, which is why studies have shown that autism social stories are an excellent aid in developing good foundations for behavior and social skills for autistic children and adults.

Social skills stories are considered an excellent tool for helping develop communication skills in children with autism spectrum.

A good source of this excellent tool for helping develop communication skills in children with autism spectrum can be found at:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

www.autismsocialstories.com/howto

Using social stories for autism

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

As typically developing beings we naturally learn social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. This ability is missing in autism spectrum disorder and often referred to as the theory of mind or social skills deficits.

 

Probably the major factor for many parents raising an autistic child is their child’s social skills deficits. This is also true in the classroom with many teachers being insufficiently trained in teaching students with autism.

 

Teaching social and communication skills can often become a primary concern for many teachers and parents.

 

Success in addressing social skills deficits by teaching social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours can increase self-confidence and lead to positive results at home and in the classroom for students with autism.


Using social stories for autism is a VERY BENEFICIAL strategy which is used by the vast majority of parents raising an autistic child, care givers and teachers.


The most important aspect of a social skills story is that it provides the child on the autism spectrum with a role model.

The vast majority of children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore strategies which suit children with autism spectrum best ARE visual like social stories.


Social stories can be used for more than learning social, imagination and communication skills, they can be used FOR TRANSITIONS, new routines, changes in routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger.

 

Using social stories for autism will help the child on the spectrum to better understand the thoughts, feelings and views of other people.


By implementing social stories for autism the child on the spectrum is more able to predict another person’s behaviour based on their actions.


Social stories present various situations and skills in a structured and clear manner in a way children with autism spectrum will find easier to understand. The social skills story should be written from the child’s perspective and follow a set formula of four sentence type: descriptive, perspective, direction and control.

Using social stories for autism will answer the important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what, helping reduce confusion and anxieties, making unpredictable situations more routine.

 

By using visual images and first person text the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which children with autism spectrum find easy to use.


Editable, and printable the social skills story will suit all ages and abilities, parents can personalize the social skills story using their child’s name and language that is familiar to them. No two children with autism are ever the same and normally some tweaking of social stories is needed.


To learn more about how using social stories for autism can benefit your child or student with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social stories have been used a s a strategy with autistic children for around twenty years giving positive results.

Other social stories for autistic children and teenagers can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010


Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders. Research suggests that 1 in every 150 children born will receive a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no known cure for autism.


For many families a diagnosis of autism is devastating, however this need not be the case. Autism Spectrum Disorder is common and there are various methods and treatments of autism available. For most families after a diagnosis of autism has been given Early Intervention is probably going to be the most useful, this will help address the child’s social skills deficits.

 

So what are social skills deficits?  Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. Meaning the autistic child will have social and communication difficulties, social skills deficits are characteristically deficits with:

Social skills

Communication difficulties

Imagination difficulties

And Interaction skills

 

Social skills deficits are quite often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “Theory of mind”.

 

Typically developing children have a natural ability to recognize and read other peoples thoughts and feelings for example as typically developing individuals we would recognize a frown as a sign of confusion or unhappiness, and a smile as a sign of pleasure or happiness. This ability to recognize the feelings and emotions of others is missing with autism.


Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

A lack of social skills, their social skills deficits, can make it hard for the autistic child to interact socially and many parents fear their autistic child will struggle with friendships and social situations.

 

There are various treatments of autism which are available to parents over the internet, which HELP to address the social skills deficits and communication difficulties that are displayed by an autistic child, such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers can use social skills stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children with autism spectrum disorder.


Social stories are normally written by experts, using appropriate first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic child. Social stories use visual images to help the child with autism spectrum disorder understand what is expected of them and in return what they can expect. Social skills stories for autism answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism spectrum disorder feel more comfortable with and in situations they may struggle to master or understand, which will cut back on negative behaviors.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Using visual supports in autism to teach social skills

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009


The best way to help an autistic child cope is to first understand the way they think.

 

Generally autistic children think in pictures. This thinking process is known as visual thought. Children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual learners.


Meaning they understand what they see, better than what they hear. Visual learners, learn through thinking in illustrations, a bit like playing a movie, instead of actual words and ideas.

 

Therefore, they benefit significantly from the use of autistic visual supports and strategies. Therefore, for many children with autism spectrum disorder, words or language are secondary.


When giving instructions to children with autism, it is advisable to try to avoid long sentences of verbal information.

 

It is recommended that visual cues and symbols help autistic children better grasp what is expected of them or what is being taught.

 

Consequently, by using visual supports in autism to teach social skills and behaviors the autistic child will better grasp the skills they struggle to master.


Children with autism generally prefer or are more able to grasp rote memory, routines and repetition.


Visual supports in autism reflect these abilities using visual images and small amounts of appropriate text, making it easier for the autistic child to understand the skill or behavior being re-enforced or learnt.


Many parents and teachers of autistic students use visual supports in autism to teach social skills and behaviors such as, asking questions, calming down, having a conversation, teaching about personal space, even hygiene issues can be tackled using autistic visual supports.

 

Probably the most significant autistic visual supports being used are autistic social skills stories, these are generally written by experts and encompass all the right ingredients to help an autistic child learn social and communication skills and behaviors, as well as cope with routine changes.

 

It is recommended that autistic social skills stories are used to help children with autism spectrum disorder cope and manage behaviors, situations, events and skills they struggle with. Autistic social skills stories help alleviate anxieties surrounding learning and carrying out social and communication skills. They can benefit the autistic child by showing them visually how, when, what and why.


Many teachers of autistic students use autistic social skills stories in the classroom with great affect.


To download or learn more about social stories visit any of the following sites:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Using visual supports in autism teaching

Friday, October 16th, 2009

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual learners often referred to as “visual thinkers”.

 

Teachers report better success rates using visual supports in autism teaching; especially if an activity is transferred from verbal to visual.

 

Using visual supports in autism teaching allows communication to occur on a verbal and nonverbal level. The idea is that using visual supports helps nonverbal students learn expressively as well as receptively.

 

Autistic students benefit from having access to visual supports such as social stories and PECS throughout their day.

 

Autism visual supports can help remind autistic students how to perform tasks such as assembly by showing them visually where they should be or what they should be doing.

 

By giving autistic students social stories you are helping them by providing them social, behavior and communication cues. 

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder can focus on the visual images and text in social stories which can help reduce anxieties surrounding tasks, events and occasions the autistic child may struggle with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder display difficulties with speech and language, which can make even the simplest on instruction difficult at times.

 

Because of these problems in understanding, some autistic children may become anxious and confused by certain times in the school day or by certain lessons.

 

For example recess, assembly, art lessons and P.E. This is where social stories for autistic students can benefit the child by providing visual supports in autism teaching the autistic student how to cope with whatever is troubling or confusing them.

 

To download various social stories for autistic students as well as other social stories for everyday activities such as tooth brushing, showering even how to visit grandparents, go shopping or out to eat can be downloaded from sites such as:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autism social skills lessons

Thursday, September 24th, 2009


Generally children with autism spectrum disorder will display challenging behaviors and lack social and communication skills.

 

Deficits in social and communication skills can include:

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder may display difficulties with initiating and responding to social interactions from others. 

 

The autistic child may display difficulties engaging in joint attention, the autistic child may have difficulties with skills such as sharing, playing, pretend play or make believe.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder lack being able to understand or demonstrate non-verbal social communication i.e. the “unwritten rules” of social interactions.

 

Children with autism are also often referred to as suffering from “mind blindness” meaning they lack the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions of other people; which can lead to social mistakes or blunders especially in teenage autistic individuals.

 

Parents of autistic children often struggle to find suitable ways of teaching social and communication skills to their autistic youngster.

 

This need not be a huge problem or issue for some families now with the onset of the internet and search engines such as google, the world has opened up to most of us, and sites offering support and advice to parents of autistic children can now be readily found.

 

A significant number of parents, professionals and schools use autism resources to help teach social and communication skills to autistic children. Autism resources such as social stories are readily used for teaching autism social skills, are visually rich and easily implemented, having all the correct components needed to effectively teach social and communication skills to autistic children.

 

As visual learners an autistic youngster will respond better to social skills stories for autistic children teaching autism social skills and many parents of autistic children as well as teachers and other professionals report great successes when social skills stories are implemented around the house and school environment.

 

Social stories for autistic children can be downloaded from many internet sites, professionally written and visually rich social skills stories for autistic children teaching autism social skills can be found at sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are also downloadable from autism resource sites, offering a wide range of various social skills stories teaching social, communication, interaction and imagination skills to the autistic youngster and the teenage autistic.

 

Autism resource site: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

Teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder

Monday, July 27th, 2009


One of the major issues for those with autism spectrum disorder is their lack of social and communication skills.

 

Those children with autism spectrum disorder will display deficits in both verbal and non-verbal communications as well as the inability to socialize normally they may have restricted abilities and interests.

 

There are various methods for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder. One method is the use of autism social stories. Parent and teachers use autism social stories to help teach a wide range of social skills both verbal and non verbal children can benefit from the introduction of appropriate social skills stories.

 

For example parents of autistic children can use social skills stories in the home setting to help teach skills such as putting on shoes, getting a drink etc to hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, showering and so on.

 

The autism social story can also be used to help for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder like visiting the dentist, going out to eat in a restaurant or visiting grand parents…

 

They are also used for autistic students in the classroom helping with school related issues.

 

All autistic students and teachers can benefit from the introduction of autism social stories at school, as well as in the home.

 

Written by experts social skills stories can tackle the most complex of issues such as death, birth and relationships. Social skills stories are written in the first person from the autistic youngsters point of view, and use appropriate language and images the autistic youngster can relate too or recognize.


They have been use for many years and have a huge success rate for teaching autism social skills to children and young people. The internet now makes it possible for parents of autistic children to research and obtain appropriate expertly written autism social skills stories on various topics. Parents of autistic children report success teaching autism social skills to children and young people using autism social skills stories and recommend there use.

 

To download a collection of 50 autism social skills stories for teaching autism social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Or one of these resources sites:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

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