Posts Tagged ‘children with autism’

Visual strategies for developing better communication for children with autism

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

What are visual strategies?

developing better communication for children with autism,visual strategiesVisual strategies are things we see.
Facial and body movements, gestures, pictures, images and objects, environmental cues and written language these are all used as visual strategies that help support our communication. The world we live in is full of visual information such as a calendar, diary, clocks, signs, logos and so on all of which are used by us daily and support our communication. Without these visual strategies our lives would be confusing.

One of the major difficulties faced by children with autism is a lack of communication skills. A child on the spectrum will almost certainly have deficits with social interactions, communication skills and imagination skills.

A lack of communication skills is a problem faced by all children with autism and is normally the main reason the child on the spectrum finds it hard to interact socially with their peers and others.

Continuous research is undertaken into the causes and treatments for autism with conclusive results showing visual strategies for developing better communication for children with autism can help increase their understanding, social interactions and communication skills and behaviours.

Generally an individual on the spectrum will be a visual thinker and learner, which means that the individual on the spectrum will think in pictures and images, and will therefore respond and understand information easier, when it is presented visually rather than written or oral.

Therefore it is important that when teaching an individual on the spectrum communication skills the teaching be visually presented, using visual strategies.

Visual strategies for improving communication in autism such as social stories, PECS, flash cards, visual schedules etc can all be used as appropriate and effective methods for teaching an individual on the spectrum communication skills.

For children with autism it is not just the struggle with using language that hinders them but also understanding language and communication can be a difficulty. Children with autism lack the ability to understand the communication of others, trying to figure out what is happening or not happening, handling changes and transitions, and interpreting cues and signals in the environment can prove difficult and result in frustration and behaviour that is seen as negative.

Using visual support tools can help the autistic child understand what’s happening around them and why it is happening. Visual supports are a good structure that can be used to help support and teach an individual autistic child daily and not so common tasks, behaviours and skills.

Social stories are visual strategies for improving communication in autism, they can be used for a variety of issues, they can be edited to suit individual needs and levels of development, social stories are printable for ease of use and convenience and can be implemented quickly and effectively.

To learn more about how implementing social stories can help you teach social and communication skills and behaviours to your child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Alternatively other sites which offer downloads and explanations on the uses and implementation of social stories for your child with autism can be located at:
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Strategies that help autistic children

Wednesday, February 7th, 2018

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is an umbrella term used to describe a range of developmental disorders such as autism, atypical autism, high-functioning autism, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder (PDD).

Strategies that help autistic childrenGenerally a child with autism will have social skills deficits in social interaction skills, communication skills and imagination skills. Some children on the autism spectrum may also have difficulties with sensory processing issues, for example – sight, sound, touch, smell and taste.

Difficulties in these areas mean that a child with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will probably have difficulties understanding and following instructions.

A child with autism may understand simple commands but may have difficulties with long or complicated instructions.

For many children on the autism spectrum shifting their attention from one activity to another can be difficult and cause anxieties, generally an autistic child will need time to process given instructions.

For parents and teachers this can be frustrating, however repeating the instruction is not going to help, this will just add to the child’s anxieties, the more you talk the more pressure the autistic child is going to feel under and the more confused they will become.

All autistic children will struggle to understand spoken or written instruction this is mainly due to their social skills deficits which as we learnt earlier are common to autism. Communication difficulties are probably one of the major struggles parents face with their child.

For children with autism communication difficulties are common, a child on the spectrum may fail to recognise nonverbal communication such as facial expression or body language and may not recognise nonverbal communication such as gesturing or pointing etc.

However there are strategies that help autistic children learn appropriate social interaction, communication and imagination skills.

For example PECS, flash cards and social skills stories are all strategies that help autistic children learn vital every day and less common social interaction skills, address communication difficulties and help develop imagination skills.

The purpose or goal of a social story is to provide the child with autism with a prompt for socially appropriate behaviour, help them become familiar with a situation, and to respond appropriately.

The social story is also used as a transition tool, helping the child with autism move on, help prepare them for a new experience, change to routine and prevent negative or inappropriate reactions that stem from a lack of social understanding.

A social story is a short story that has been written in a specific style and format. That uses visual images much like a comic script that gives the child with autism information through pictures and text providing clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, what, why, where and when as well as giving an insight into the emotions, thoughts and feelings of others and giving appropriate responses to social skills and situations the child with autism may otherwise be struggling with or may find confusing.

To obtain social skills stories that are used as strategies that help autistic children learn appropriate social interaction, communication and imagination skills visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Visual method to teach social skills to children with autism

Monday, October 9th, 2017

A child with Autism will not set out intentionally to misbehave or cause stress or upset to anyone, simply out of fun or mischief.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.

 

The common characteristics of autism will often make the child appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.

 

Using a visual method to teach social skills to children with autism is useful. Research suggests an improvement in social behaviour can be seen when social stories are introduced.

 

Using social stories can improve communication issues and help the child with Autism understand behaviours like pretend play, and making friends. Social stories are short descriptive narratives like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.

 

They use images to help show what is happening and what is expected of them. Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how to use this visual method to teach social skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Using Visual Supports for Autism at Christmas

Friday, November 4th, 2016

For many children with autism spectrum disorder Christmas can be a time of high stress and confusion.

Autism social stories for Christmas,Intervention Strategies such as Social Skills Stories for Christmas

With changes to routines at home and at school, many autistic children can suffer sensory overload. Triggering “meltdowns” and anxiety

As any parent with an autistic child knows, any change to routines can cause problems

“Intervention Strategies such as Social Skills Stories for Christmas ARE used with GREAT effect”

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why and give the child with autism clear coping strategies for this time of year!

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas/index.html