Posts Tagged ‘child with an ASD’

Explain what social skills stories are

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Children with autism spectrum disorder HAVE social skills deficits and do not learn social and communication skills in the typical manner and unlike normally developing children do need direct teaching.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories ARE used to help teach children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills

 

Social skills stories are a powerful teaching strategy, a good social story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction, breaking it down into smaller easier to understand sections.

 

A social story will provide the child on the spectrum with accurate information which is important because a child on the spectrum will often find social situations confusing.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories can be used for various situations and skills that the child on the spectrum may be struggling with for example:  hygiene skills, making conversation, asking questions, respecting personal space, sharing, taking turns, recess, PE lessons and so on…

 

Using visual images a social story depicts the situation by means of relevant social cues and answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

 

It is probably easier to explain what social skills stories are by giving an example of how a social story can be implemented and used to help a child on the spectrum deal with a situation or skill that they are struggling with.

 

For example: your child with an ASD may struggle to make friends, this will be mainly due to their social skills deficits; having social skills deficits is common to autism. The social story can help the child with an ASD approach a potential friend and give them suggestions of possible outcomes, what to say and how to act as well as what the other child may expect of them i.e. respecting personal space etc.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories are implemented and used for children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories need no formal training to use, are normally written in word format or PDF, can be personalized and edited to make them suitable for all ages and abilities. No two autistic individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore social skills stories can need altering for different autistic individuals.

For a list of 100 downloadable social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Children with ASD need social skills

Friday, December 10th, 2010

Research indicates that social impairments ARE a common symptom of autism, and that all individuals with autism will have social impairments of varying degrees dependant on their own personal level of ability.

 

Commonly, all children with ASD struggle with social skills and need direct teaching using Intervention Strategies designed specifically for this.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills and behaviours naturally through watching and copying their peers and parents and directly from their environment etc.

 

Children with ASD need social skills teaching; they will not naturally mimic or interpret and learn social or communication skills. A child with an ASD will have difficulties following instruction unless the instruction or information is presented in a manner which they can readily understand.

 

We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are in-fact VISUAL THINKERS AND LEARNERS. This means that they think in pictures a bit like a movie script playing, and will not easily understand information that is written or spoken.

 

Consequently, appropriate Intervention Strategies ARE needed which ARE visual, such as PECS, Flash cards and social stories.

 

Unlike typically developing children a child with an ASD will not readily accept changes or transition and can become stressed and overwhelmed by tasks, skills and activities the rest of us think of as “everyday” or “normal”, like for example brushing your teeth, visiting a dentist, getting a haircut, recess, respecting personal space, making friends and so on.

 

Social Stories ARE perfect Intervention Strategies which were first introduced by therapist Carol Gray twenty years ago to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with. Today Social Stories ARE used not only to HELP autistic children master communication skills both verbal and non-verbal but also to HELP children on the spectrum learn new skills, cope with changes to routines, transitions and encourage positive behaviours.

 

Social Stories USE visual images LIKE A VISUAL PLAN OR ROLE MODEL to describe a situation or skill in terms of relevant “social cues”, like a comic script conversation.

 

A social skills story is normally written in first person text and in a manner that children on the spectrum WILL BETTER understand.

 

Social stories break the skill down in to smaller sections the relevant “social cues” removing the fluff and un-necessary language, in a set formula of 4 main sentence types: Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and Control sentences.

 

Intervention Strategies such as a social skills story should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of those around them, which WILL HELP to reduce stress and confusion.

 

For example a social skills story written to help explain the need to brush your teeth would explain visually and with first person relevant text the “wh” questions why and how as well as what the consequence of not brushing would be – tooth ache etc. This story may start something like this:

 

It is important that I brush my teeth twice a day, I can brush them every morning and before I go to bed at night. 

AND SO ON…

To learn more about HOW YOU CAN HELP Children with ASD need social skills teaching USING methods like social stories visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

ASD and social skills stories

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

A social story is written to help a person with ASD address social skills deficits and pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.


Children on the spectrum do not naturally acquire social and communication skills and lack he ability to interact with others effectively, this is due to social skills deficits. Social skills need to be taught directly through deliberate treatments and intervention strategies.


Teaching children with ASD social skills using intervention strategies


Probably the most significant of the various intervention strategies are social skills stories. Social skills stories can be easily implemented and used to teach the social and communication skills and behaviours that the child with an ASD is struggling with.


Having social impairments is much like being dropped in a foreign country with no idea where or how to get home or communicate. Children on the spectrum will need intervention strategies to acquire functional and age-appropriate social skills, make friendships, and learn communication skills.


We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual intervention strategies are excellent.


Visual intervention strategies


Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies. Written in first person text and using visual images and pictures to describe the situation or skill in detail, a social skills story break the skill into appropriate social cues, following a set formula the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation for the person with an ASD to follow.


Social skills stories provide concrete information on what people in a given situation are doing, thinking or feeling. The social skills story is like a visual plan showing the steps or sequence of events, identifying the significant social cues and their meaning, answering the important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why


For a child with an ASD social stories should describe social situations, contexts, and the likely behaviours of others and provide an appropriate behavioural response cue that the child with an ASD can understand.


Therefore teaching children with an ASD social skills using intervention strategies LIKE social stories is beneficial.


For children with an ASD social skills stories act as a VISUAL PLAN OR FRAMEWORK that helps children with autism understand skills and behaviours that they struggle with.


To learn more about children with ASD and social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Communication difficulties in child with autism

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Common to individuals with autism are social skills deficits. Having social skills deficits can make communication difficult for a child with autism.

As typical beings we communicate both verbally and non-verbally daily. Communication is a major skill, we naturally learn. For individuals with autism however the ability to communicate is affected, having ASD can make an individual react and interact in a very different manner to typically developing beings.

For a child with an ASD expressing their needs or wants, can quite often be misunderstood. For example: In the classroom; A child with autism may not typically ask for a drink when they are thirsty, they may for example snatch the drink from another person, simply take the drink without asking or maybe they will shout out etc., this is typical to autism.

 

Normally all adverse autistic behaviour will happen for a reason an internal or external factor, not simply out of mischief or the desire to be awkward or naughty.

Research shows us autistic children are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching or caring for a child with autism it is usually best to use visual tools and supports when you are trying to get information across or tackle an adverse autistic behaviour. 

 

Research shows a child with autism will be less confused when the information presented to them is visual.

Understandably many teachers especially those teaching in mainstream education are little prepared to teach a child with autism. The English language is predominantly verbal, and this is the main focus in mainstream education. However with an autistic student this method of teaching is not always going to be affective.

With a poor attention span and communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication the autistic student may struggle with lessons which are primarily verbal or written.

A lack social skills and communication difficulties can make it problematic for autistic children to make and maintain friendships, and generally “fit in” socially.

Using visual support tools for autism such as social stories; WILL help to improve communication difficulties in a child with autism.

Using visual supports tools for autism within the classroom and at home can help the child with an ASD focus on the skill or situation that they are struggling with. A social skills story can show the child with an ASD a visual step by step plan or framework of what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) helping the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, the social story has now evolved into a significant tool used by parents and teachers to help them improve communication difficulties and social skills in their child with autism.

To find out more about social stories and how they help improve communication difficulties in a child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other sites offering social stories to improve social and communication skills for the autistic student can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Visual supports in autism

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Individuals with autism are often described as “visual learners” or “visual thinkers.” Which means they think in pictures, consequently autism resources need to be visual.

Research suggests greater success when parents and teachers use visual supports rather than oral or written supports and resources.

Such visual supports in autism resources as social skills stories, flash cards, visual schedules, PECS system etc. 

There are many aspects of an autistic child’s environment and everyday activities which will benefit from visual supports for autism.

Using social skills stories – Social stories are word and picture-based stories, much like a comic strip conversation, written to help the child with autism understand and feel more comfortable with skills, activities, communication and social situations.

Social stories are normally written in a specific manner, from the autistic child’s point of view and always using first person text and visual images. By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into how other people may feel or think.

Using visual schedules – Visual schedules are a set of pictures that communicate a series of activities or the steps of a specific activity. A visual schedule can help the child with autism understand and manage their daily activities, which reduces stress and anxiety.

Using visual supports in autism such as flash cards – A common problem for children with autism spectrum disorder is their ability to communicate. Flash cards are a strategy which can help to increase vocabulary, promote language development, and strengthen communication skills when teaching.

All of these strategies are useful for individuals with autism and related conditions.

To learn more about how social skills stories can benefit your child with an ASD and gain immediate downloads of social stories for autistic children visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Where you will find a selection of social skills stories for autistic children and young people

To learn more about visual supports in autism such as flash cards and visual schedules visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual.html

Where you will find a selection of flash cards available for visual schedules and as communication aids for ASD children

 

Other visual supports in autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Strategies to teach children with autism

Friday, August 20th, 2010

A child with an ASD will not intentionally cause stress or upset anybodies feelings. A child with an ASD will not misbehave or harm simply out of fun or mischief.


Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.


The common characteristics of autism will often make a child with autism appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.


These are not bad characteristics, just difficult to understand. However for parents with autistic children these common characteristics of autism can make life extremely difficult and at times stressful.


Strategies to teach children with autism social and communication skills and behaviours are useful, research does suggest parents report significant improvements in social behaviours.


Having the ability to socially interact and communicate both verbally and nonverbally is a naturally learnt ability in typically developing beings. These skills however are missing in autistic children and need to be taught directly.


Using strategies to teach children with autism such as social stories does show vast improvements in social and communication skills. Social stories are short descriptive stories like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.


Using visual images which most autistic people find easier to understand and first person text the social story breaks the skill down into relevant social cues and shows the individual with autism spectrum disorder what to expect and what others will expect from them.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how using strategies to teach children with autism like social stories will help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Probably one of the major roles a parent plays in their child’s development is teaching their child social skills. For example daily living skills like potty training, interaction skills like sharing, taking turns, and allowing others to talk without interrupting.

 

Typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally by people watching, observing how those around them do things and handle social situations. We don’t really stop to consider how easily our typically developing children can master suitable age appropriate social and communication skills.


However this is not the case for a child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

 

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

 

For a child with an ASD learning social and communication skills naturally is not easy, due to social skills deficits common to all individuals with autism.

 

Individuals with autism do not people watch and fail to recognise some nonverbal communication such as gestures and signs, for example waving goodbye, a thumb’s up or shhhhhh etc.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder need direct teaching of social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Consequently, parents are encouraged to help their autistic youngster learn appropriate social skills. Having social skills deficits may mean your child fails to recognise subtle cues, maybe unable to read body language or facial expression and misunderstand language such as wit, humour, jokes and slang etc…


So; social skills deficits how can you help your autistic child overcome them, many parents use visual supports for autism. This is mainly because children with autism spectrum disorder are normally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and images, which makes using visual supports for autism beneficial.

 

Therefore using visual supports for autism is going to help you teach your autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills. There are various visual supports for autism available, but probably the best know and most affective are social skills stories.


A social skills story is a visual framework that is effective in teaching children with autism social and communication skills. A social skills story breaks the skills or situation down into relevant key points giving explanations of the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into nonverbal communication such as the thoughts, feelings and emotions that may be felt by others.


By using visual images and first person text a social story allows the child on the spectrum to visually identify with the skill or situation making it predictable and routine. Individuals with autism prefer to stick rigidly to routines and can become stressed if routines are altered or changed, social skills stories are ideal for this, they can prepare the autistic child for upcoming changes.


Social skills stories follow specific patterns of sentence types, are editable and printable making them convenient and easy to use. The social skills story can be used to teach most social and communication skills. For example potty training, using a toilet, washing your hands, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, not interrupting, asking questions, making friends, even social situations like visiting the dentist etc..


By breaking the skill or situation down in to understandable pieces, removing all fluff and irrelevant material etc the social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan allowing the child on the spectrum to feel more in control and comfortable. Removing all fear or dread of the unknown, the social story makes the skills or situation predictable just how a child on the spectrum likes things to be.


To learn more about social skills stories and how they are used to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Where you will learn more about…what are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them as well as getting downloads of social skills stories used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism.


Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism

Monday, June 21st, 2010

Children with autism do not develop socially in the same manner as typically developing children. ASD (Autism spectrum disorder) is a neurological disorder affecting the way an individual’s brain develops

 

Children with an ASD have difficulty making friends and getting on well with their peers.

 

A child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is far more likely to enjoy unusual interests not shared by their peers, for example an obsession with train timetables, clock mechanisms etc. This can in some cases cause the child to become socially isolated and unable to integrate fully with their peers.

 

All children with autism will have social skills deficits. However the individual’s social skills deficits will vary between children with an ASD, as no two children will ever be exactly the same.

 

Having social skills deficits can make it hard for children with autism to understand how other children are feeling, their emotions, they will be unable to read the other child’s body language or facial expression.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism can be difficult. However with time and perseverance, as well as autism supports like social skills stories this can be achieved.

 

What are social skills stories?

 

A social story is a short story that has been written in a specific style and format. A social story gives information through visual images and text, providing clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation.


The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what. Showing visually what people do and why they do it, like a role model for the child with an ASD. This can help relieve anxieties and stress that can surround some social situations, for example making friends, asking questions, sharing, taking turns even respecting personal space, in-fact most social and communications difficulties can be addressed using social skills stories.


In fact the social skills story acts as a prompt for socially acceptable behaviours and can help the child with autism understand situations and skills and show them appropriate responses.

 

The social skills story can help the child with autism prepare for routine changes and new situations, which can help reduce negative reactions and behaviours which stem from a lack of social understanding.

 

Overcoming social skills issues in children with autism using social skills stories has already proven successful, today social stories are considered one of the major autism supports and are widely used in homes, schools, colleges and out and about.

 

To learn more about autism supports such as social skills stories visit sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills where you will also find a vast selection of social skills stories which can be downloaded.


Other sites of interest are:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com