Posts Tagged ‘child on the autism spectrum’

Directing Autistic Repetitive Behavior

Sunday, July 28th, 2013

 

What is meant by autistic repetitive behavior? And why do children with autism engage in this behavior?

 

First we need to understand what autism is?

 

Autism is a life long disorder affecting the brain, some of the symptoms of autism are:

 

Communication difficulties

Social deficits

Imagination and Interaction deficit…

 

Autism can not be cured and as yet research has not defined the cause of autism spectrum disorder, there are at present various thoughts on the root cause of autism spectrum disorder.

 

Most children with autism will engage in some form of repetitive behavior…

 

What is autistic repetitive behavior?

 

A repetitive behavior is something a person does repeatedly without reason or thought. Research shows repetition is common in autism all children with autism will like repetition and sameness in all aspects of their lives.

 

Some autistic repetitive behavior is thought to be because of an overload in sensory input. Children with autism are very sensitive and can be easily overwhelmed by their environment.

 

Therefore the child on the autism spectrum will engage in a repetitive behavior such as finger flicking, rocking or other stimming behavior as a means of calming their senses.

 

Some children with autism are very sensitive to touch and will shy away from physical contact, preferring not to be touched, which can be quite hard to understand as a parent.

 

Research suggests autistic repetitive behavior can be a means of controlling sensory overload in children with autism. We all engage in some form of repetitive behavior at some point in our lives, we like to pick the same lottery numbers, we wont miss our soaps, we must leave the remote in a certain place etc…all forms of repetitive behavior.

 

Directing autistic repetitive behavior in children with autism can be helped by using autism social stories…

 

Autism social stories can be implemented to help control behaviors such as stimming.

 

Pictorially rich with appropriate text these specific expertly written autism tools can be used to manage almost all aspects and situations the child on the autism spectrum is finding confusing, stressful or makes them anxious.

 

They give the child on the autism spectrum clear instruction of how, where, why and when, helping them control their sense and make sense of the world around them.

 

To download autism social stories which can help by directing autistic repetitive behavior visit:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum

Monday, July 22nd, 2013

Autism social stories are a visual autism tool used to help teach and implement social skills to children with autism spectrum.

 

Autism social stories provide the person on the autism spectrum an explanation and visual framework of the skill or situation that they may find difficult or confusing.

 

Research shows that Autistic social stories are an excellent visual autism tool which can be used to help reduce stress and inappropriate behaviours in some children with an ASD. The autistic social skills story also increases social understanding and has been reported as a good approach for helping children with an ASD to reach their full potential.

 

The goal of a autistic social skills story is to increase the autistic child’s understanding of skills and social situations they are struggling to master and understand. By making the child with an ASD more comfortable with and in the situation, and suggest possible responses they may receive from others.

 

Autism social skills stories follow specific sentence types: descriptive, perspective, directive and control. Introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, social stories have grown into a very popular visual strategy that can be used with all autistic individuals regardless of age and ability.

 

Generally autistic social skills stories are written by experts, teachers and parents to help teach social and communication skills to autistic individuals. Autism social stories can be edited to suit all needs, personalized, printed and are portable making them convenient and easy to use.

 

An autistic social skills story can be introduced to help deal with any situation or skill that the child on the autism spectrum needs help with. No formal training is needed to use social skills stories, site which offer support and expertly written social stories can be found using search engines such as Google.

 

Sites that offer Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum like http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer support and downloads of autistic social skills stories for various situations and skills for a small fee.

 

An autistic social skills story should be visual and use first person text, like a role model the social skills story will help with transitions, and changes to routines as well as teach and support social skills and communication difficulties.

 

For more information on this visual strategy visit any of the following sites and find Autistic social skills stories for children with autism spectrum

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching kids with autism social skills using social stories

Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Typically kids with autism HAVE deficits in social and communication skills and behaviours, which can often lead to tension, stress and anxiety.

Commonly kids with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in images and WILL almost certainly use speech/language secondary.

Therefore visual strategies ARE typically of more benefit to the child on the autism spectrum. Probably the most significant of the visual strategies ARE social skills stories.

Teaching kids with autism social skills using social stories as a strategy has proven successful. The social story is written in first person text and uses visual images to describe the skill or situation in a manner that the child on the spectrum can understand and is comfortable with.

The social story WILL typically answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should attempt to offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of considerable weakness in most kids with autism.

Social stories ACT like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation being taught or re-enforced. The skill or situation is broken down into smaller sections with images much like a comic script and is then presented from the child’s own perspective.

Teaching kids with autism social skills using social stories CAN HELP with skills such as: making friends, sharing, taking turns, recess, trying new foods, hygiene and self-help skills.

In fact a social story can be introduced for almost any situation or skill the child on the autism spectrum is struggling with.

To learn more about how and when social stories can be used visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

The social story needs NO formal training to use.

The social story should typically be written in word format making it easy to edit and personalize.

Social stories ARE typically written by experts and parents of children on the spectrum. To gain immediate downloads of OVER 100 social skills stories visit:

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Building autistic social skills

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Autism is a developmental disorder which has no known cure. That said THERE ARE plenty of excellent resources which can be used to help those diagnosed autistic.

Characteristically those diagnosed autistic WILL have social and communication difficulties, this is due to social skills deficits which ARE apparent in all people with autism but to varying degrees.

Typically people with autism WILL prefer visual information and teaching, it is therefore believed that resources and teaching styles should be more visual.

This is easily achieved through the use of visual resources for autism such as social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Using visual resources for autism is beneficial, and typically will need no formal training to implement and use.

For example social skills stories ARE visual resources for autism which ARE used specifically for building autistic social skills and helping to overcome communication and social awareness difficulties.

Having social skills deficits can be challenging for many children on the autism spectrum and can at times even lead to extreme behaviours, even bullying.

So how does the social story work?

The social skills story is a short visual story much like a comic script which is used as a visual framework or step by step detailed plan of the skill or situation that the child on the autism spectrum is finding hard.

Many children on the autism spectrum struggle with the chaos of recess, by implementing a social skills story the child will have a concrete plan of recess. This plan WILL explain what is happening and why, which WILL help the child on the autism spectrum cope and feel more comfortable.

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the child’s own point of view and use first person text. The social skills story describes the situation using images and short descriptive sentences or words.

The social story should answer the “wh” questions:-who, what, why, when and where. The social skills story should also answer “how” and provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children on the autism spectrum.

To view and learn more about visual resources for autism like social skills stories for building autistic social skills and to access immediate downloads visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Adopting successful social skills teaching for children with autism

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

There are some very good resources available that can help children with autism to overcome social skills difficulties.

Adopting successful social skills teaching for children with autism is easier using visual support tools like: PECS, Social Skills Stories, Picture Communication Cards and so on…

We know that predominantly children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they ARE more likely to understand and learn from information that is presented visually.

Therefore it is believed that successful social skills teaching for children with autism is done visually using visual support tools. For example social skills stories use images/pictures to explain how and why.

The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic individuals.

Acting much like a visual step by step plan or framework of the skill or behaviour the social story will allow the child on the autism spectrum to rehearse the skill, reducing any stresses and anxiety.

Social skills stories use first person text in a positive manner and always from the point of view of the child on the autism spectrum.

The social story is easy to implement and needs “NO formal training to use”

The social story can be used for most situations, skills and behaviours such as asking questions and making friends. It can also be used for teaching kids on the spectrum skills like sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, coping at recess and many other skills including self-help and hygiene skills.

To view appropriate information on adopting successful social skills teaching for children with autism using social stories and picture communication cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Download and Use Autistic Supports with Your Child on the Spectrum

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

It is common for those with autism to have deficits in social awareness sills and behaviours.  This is due to the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits means the person’s social, communication and imagination skills are missing or not developed sufficiently.

This can cause many difficulties for those with autism, for example lacking social and communication skills can make it hard for them to make friends, ask questions and join in with play.

The majority of children on the autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand. It is therefore a good idea to use visual autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum.

There are various visual autistic supports available like social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum from sites like:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find various supports for autism which can be used effectively and with no need for any formal training.

Autistic supports such as social skills stories are designed to help you teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours that the child with autism is struggling with.

The social story WILL ACT like a visual plan or framework of the skill by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in those with autism.

The social story should be written from the child’s own perspective, in first person text and in a manner the child with autism can understand. It should be use images or pictures to show visually what is happening and why, this is important.

Generally social skills stories are written in word format to make editing easy, none of us typically use the same terminology and no two children are ever going to be the same, so the ability to edit is important.

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the spectrum such as social skills stories by visiting:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will also find picture communication cards and other supports for autism which can be used to help your child on the spectrum cope with and feel more comfortable in situations that he/she is finding stressful or confusing.

 

 

 

Autism Behaviour Supports and Techniques

Tuesday, March 20th, 2012

The main difficulties experienced by those on the autism spectrum are deficits in three main areas of development: social awareness, communication (verbal and non-verbal) also imagination skills.

It is these deficits which ARE common to all those on the autism spectrum in varying degrees, depending on the individuals own abilities.

Children with autism ARE typically visual thinkers and learners which means that VISUAL SUPPORTS are going to be easier for the child on the autism spectrum to USE and UNDERSTAND.

There is no known cure for autism but there ARE significant “Autism Behaviour Supports and Techniques” available which ARE visual and can be easily implemented.

For example – Autism Behaviour Supports and Techniques like:

Autism Social Skills Stories, Visual Social Story Cards, Communication Cards, PECS and so on…

All of these ARE visual supports which can be used to help the child on the autism spectrum OVERCOME their own individual challenges and deficits.

Autism Social Skills Stories - USE images/pictures and can act like a visual plan/framework of the skill or behaviour being tackled. For example a social story can be implemented to help the child with autism cope with group activities, learn appropriate social skills like asking questions, respecting personal space, taking turns and so on…

The social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and WILL offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in those on the autism spectrum.

Autism Social Skills Stories ARE normally written in first person text and WILL usually be written from the perspective of the child with autism. The social story should also be written in word format to make editing and printing easier.

No two children with autism WILL ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore editing and personalization ARE important.

To learn more about Autism Behaviour Supports and Techniques such as Autism Social Skills Stories, Visual Social Story Cards and Communication Cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues

Saturday, February 18th, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties that parents with an autistic child report is their child’s behaviour issues.

It is important to remember that unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum is far less likely to misbehave “just because” and that most if not ALL autistic behaviour WILL happen for a reason an internal or external factor.

Typically children with autism HAVE social skills deficits in three main areas of development: social awareness, communication – both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills, as well as sensory processing issues.

It is these social skills deficits and sensory processing issues which WILL contribute to the majority of behaviour issues in autism.

Managing autistic behaviour issues can BE ACHIEVED through the use of Intervention Strategies.

Intervention Strategies ARE put in place to help the autistic child manage their behaviours and find coping methods for skills and behaviours that they are struggling with.

Intervention Strategies like social skills stories and visual social story cards ARE probably the most significant of the Intervention Strategies for helping with managing autistic behaviour issues.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories written to help children with autism overcome social skills deficits. A social skills story CAN act like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation the autistic child is struggling with.

A social skills story WILL use appropriate first person text and be from the child’s won perspective. It should be written in word format to allow for editing and personalization as this is important for children with autism and we all use different terminology with our children.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties USE visual images/pictures to help show the child on the spectrum visually what is happening making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners this means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about managing autistic behaviour issues using Intervention Strategies like social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find downloads of approx. 100 social stories.

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

As with typically developing children every child with autism spectrum disorder is going to be different, with their own unique set of needs and abilities.

But unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum WILL struggle to naturally learn social awareness skills and behaviours.

Autism is a neurological disorder which affects how the child on the spectrum processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts and behaves. These deficits ARE common to autism and are generally referred to as social skills deficits.

Although there is no cure for autism there ARE some very GOOD resources that can help. For example: Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder like social skills stories, communication picture cards, flash cards and PECS.

Probably the most significant resource for teaching kids with ASD ARE social skills stories. These were first developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with.

Typically the vast majority of kids with ASD WILL have problems with social awareness skills, therefore social stories ARE implemented to help overcome these difficulties.

A social skills story WILL act like a visual framework or plan of the skill the child on the autism spectrum needs help with or is finding stressful – like for example making friends, asking questions, sharing and so on…

The social skills story WILL give exact information in a manner that the child on the autism spectrum CAN understand and always from the child’s own perspective, using first person text.

Visual images/pictures ARE a strong means of communication for ALL children with autism as they tend to be mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, this makes social skills stories ideal.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder WILL also answer the ever so important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “how” and WILL also offer the child an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness on most kids with ASD.

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder such as social skills stories CAN be viewed at http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will be able to gain immediate downloads of around 100 social skills stories.

These social stories may be edited and need NO formal training to use. We all use different terminology with our children therefore social stories need to be editable as well as printable so that they may be taken to wherever the child needs the help.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

Using Autistic Social Stories

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Autistic Social Stories are a VISUAL SUPPORT that is USED for teaching communication and social skills to children with autism and related disabilities.

Autistic Social Stories WILL give the autistic individual accurate information about those situations that he/she may find difficult or confusing. The skill or situation is described in detail using first person text and VISUAL images/pictures with key focus being given to the social cues.

Focus on the the important social cues, WILL provide the autistic individual with an idea of what WILL happen, the actions and reactions that might be expected of him/her, and why.

Using Autistic Social Stories WILL answer the “wh” questions - who, what, where, when and why as well as “how” and WILL provide the child on the autism spectrum with an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of considerable weakness in many children with autism.

The main idea of the social story is to increase the autistic individuals understanding of and to make him/her more comfortable in the situation. The social story also aims to help the child on the autism spectrum find ways of coping with skills and situations that he/she is struggling with.

Autistic Social Stories are a VISUAL SUPPORT that CAN be used for various situations and skills, is easy to implement and WILL need NO formal training to use. It should be editable as no two individuals with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

To see examples and to find out more information about using Autistic Social Stories for your child on the autism spectrum visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Visual social story support cards

Wednesday, July 27th, 2011

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures, making visual information far easier to understand.

Visual supports ARE an essential element when teaching or supporting a child on the autism spectrum. There ARE many forms of visual supports available to children with autism such as PECS visual flash cards, visual social story support cards, social stories and so on, all equally as good and all with their own purpose and use.

Typically children with autism struggle with social awareness skills and communication both verbal (spoken language) and non-verbal (gestures), which can make even simple activities or skills difficult to master or understand.

Visual social story support cards ARE used in much the same way as regular social stories. However with a regular social skills story the story is generally all presented in one go on a sheet of paper or card like a script.

With visual social story support cards the social skills story is broken into sections and each individual section is then written or printed on to a card with appropriate picture/image and presented individually.

Social story cards can be presented in either a folder or on a ring or key ring, making them very portable and convenient.

Social stories were developed originally to aid communication, but have since grown into one of the most significant tools used in the treatment of autism.

Social stories aim to answer the ever important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well HOW and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

Using visual support cards for autism needs NO formal training. To learn more about visual support cards for autism and how they WILL benefit your child on the autism spectrum visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

This resource is featured along with regular social stories and other visual supports for autism like visual flash cards.

Social skills for autism

Monday, May 23rd, 2011

Most children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) find social situations very difficult. As typically developing individuals we learn social skills instinctively from our family, teachers, peers and general environment.

 

Unfortunately children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) are not able to instinctively learn social and communication skills, this is due to the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments is typically present in all children on the autism spectrum and is displayed in lack of social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

 

For example a child on the autism spectrum will struggle to make and maintain friends, ask questions and engage in pretend play and so on…

 

It is generally due to the triad of autistic impairments that can sometimes lead the child with autism to be the subject of jibes, social mistakes and blunders due to their lack of appropriate social and communication skills.

 

Autism social stories are used as a treatment of autism to help children with an ASD learn and develop an understanding of social and communication skills.

 

Autism social stories are used by parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals working or involved with children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.

 

Autism social stories were originally developed by therapist Gray to help her communicate with the children on the autism spectrum she was working with, today social skills stories are used more widely as a means of developing social understanding and addressing communication difficulties.

 

A social skills story should introduce appropriate social knowledge, using first person text and visual images to describe the social situation or skill. It explains the how’s and whys of a social setting by answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what.

 

A social skills story should be made up of four different sentence types, descriptive, perspective, directive and control sentences.

 

Generally children with an ASD are visual thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching a child on the autism spectrum it is generally easier to make information as visual as possible, that way the child will find the information easier to understand.

 

This is why a good social skills story will give information through pictures and first person text, each social skills story provides clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation. The social skills story acts as role model for the child on the spectrum, helping them understand and cope with social situations and address communication difficulties effectively.

 

To learn more about social skills for autism, as well as how social skills stories can help children with an ASD visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

For information on social skills for autism, as well as downloads of Autism social stories visit any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Behaviour Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

Autism is a lifelong neurological disorder, which is generally diagnosed before the child
reaches their third birthday.

What are the behaviour characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder…The main characteristics
of autism spectrum disorder are the individual’s deficits in social,
communication both verbal and non-verbal as well as imagination skills.

If you are the parent or teacher of a child on the autism spectrum and are looking for
methods and treatments for autism then read on…

There is “no cure for autism” but there are some very good methods and treatments for autism
which can have a massive impact on your child’s life and help them reach
his/her full potential, as well as deal with their social, communication and
imagination skills deficits.

Some of the treatments for autism available include:

ABA

PECS’s
communication boards

Social Skills Stories

Visual support cards

For the purpose of this article we will be looking at social skills stories and visual support cards.

What are social skills stories?

So what are social skills stories – Quite often you will come across various names for
social skills stories like: autism social stories, social stories and so on,
but whatever you call them they are all relatively similar.

A social skills story will normally follow a formula first defined about twenty years
ago by therapist Carol Gray, to help her communicate with the autistic children
she was caring for. The formula consists of four sentence types

Descriptive

Directive

Perspective

Control

Social skills stories are used to help teach autistic children and adults to overcome
any social skills deficits.

Typically all individuals with an ASD will have deficits in social, communication and
imagination skills, this is a common symptom of autism.

For example a child on the spectrum may have difficulties with following social rules such
as sharing, taking turns, making friends, respecting personal space, having a
conversation, asking questions and so on. Using a social skills story will help
the child on the autism spectrum overcome their difficulties

A parent or teacher of a child on the spectrum can easily implement social stories to help
their child cope with even everyday life skills like using the bathroom and recess;
in-fact social stories have many uses.

What do social stories look like?

A social story is generally written in first person text, using appropriate language and
always from the autistic person’s point of view.

Typically autism social stories are visual.

Generally children with autism tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in
pictures. Therefore it is beneficial to use visual intervention strategies such
as social stories.

Using images and text the social skills story acts as a role model or visual step by step plan
describing the situation or skill in terms of relevant social cues. Answering
the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW”
and giving an insight in to the thoughts and feelings of others which is a
marked area of weakness in most children with autism.

Example of autism social story

Emily has difficulties with sharing and will display inappropriate behaviours and
tantrums.

So looking at an example of autism social story for Emily; Emily’s main problem is
tantrums when she does not get her own way…

Therefore we would start a story for Emily giving focus to the key points…

Line one: My name is Emily I am six years of age; (This is a descriptive sentence, it is
describing who the story is about in this case Emily).

A small image maybe added here or an actual photo showing Emily.

Line two: Every day I like to play with the toys in the classroom; (This is also descriptive,
it describes what Emily likes to do, in this case playing with the toys in the
classroom).

Again another image or small photo of Emily is added. The image or photo could be of Emily in
the classroom playing with the toys etc.

And this is how the story is built up; the next two sentences would be perspective
sentences.

Again with appropriate images or pictures, and slowly the story starts to take shape.

There is no need for any formal teaching to use social stories.

All autism social stories should be editable, we all use different terminology and no two
children are the same. Therefore it is really important that parents and
teachers are able to edit the social story to make it relevant to their own
child on the spectrum.

You can learn more about social stories and how they are used, as well as get downloads
of social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Visual support cards

Another great autism resource is visual support cards. Similar to social stories the
visual support cards can help support social and communication deficits.

For example many children on the spectrum have difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal
communication, and many children on the spectrum will never develop speech.

The visual support card is used as a means of communication. Children with autism spectrum
have difficulties with communication and can become distressed and confused relatively
quickly. It is important to remember with children on the spectrum to speak
less and use other means of communication like visual intervention strategies
such as visual support cards.

A child with an ASD can use the visual support card to help them understand what is expected
of them as well as what they are expecting of others.

For example

Teachers can use visual support cards on the student’s visual timetable, choices board even
around the classroom to label areas and objects like the toilet, pencil tray,
computers and so on helping the child with an ASD quickly identify what is
required, reducing anxiety and stress.

To learn more about visual support cards and see some examples visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

For other methods and treatments for autism like autism social stories which can have a massive
impact on the lives of children with autism spectrum and help them reach his/her full potential visit: http://www.autismsocialstories

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Social stories were first developed round twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray. To aid the communication difficulties she was having with the autistic students she worked with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder have problems in three main areas of development: Social interaction skills, they may struggle to make friends, understand the unspoken rules of social interaction, be unable to recognise social cues and signals, not respect personal space and display at times weird or odd behaviours, many autistic students fail to understand school and class rules.

 

Communication difficulties with both verbal (spoken) language and non-verbal communication; For example gestures, sign language, reading or interpreting body language and facial expression.

 

AS well as imagination skills, children with autism spectrum disorder live in a very literal world and find make believe hard to understand a child with autism will also struggle with humour, pretend play. They may also display obsessive behaviours and fail to recognise or indeed understand why others may not share their interest.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder aim to HELP address these social skills deficits. All autistic children will have some or all of the above social skills deficits with varying degrees of severity dependant on where the child with autism falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE implemented to help with various skills and situations the child on the autism spectrum is struggling with for example making friends, washing their teeth, coping with recess, respecting personal space and so on.

 

Written in first person language in a consistent manner social stories answer the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give the child on the autism spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and actions of others.

 

Normally following a set pattern of sentence type a social story WILL act as a role model or VISUAL PLAN of the skill or situation.

 

We know children on the spectrum ARE mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, a good social story will follow this concept and USE visual images or pictures to show visually the skill or situation being taught or encouraged.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder should be editable because we all use different terminology with our own child, they should be easy to personalize making them suitable for all ages and abilities.

 

To learn more about how social  skills stories can be implemented and to gain access to over 100 social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Using social stories for autism

Thursday, November 4th, 2010

As typically developing beings we naturally learn social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. This ability is missing in autism spectrum disorder and often referred to as the theory of mind or social skills deficits.

 

Probably the major factor for many parents raising an autistic child is their child’s social skills deficits. This is also true in the classroom with many teachers being insufficiently trained in teaching students with autism.

 

Teaching social and communication skills can often become a primary concern for many teachers and parents.

 

Success in addressing social skills deficits by teaching social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours can increase self-confidence and lead to positive results at home and in the classroom for students with autism.


Using social stories for autism is a VERY BENEFICIAL strategy which is used by the vast majority of parents raising an autistic child, care givers and teachers.


The most important aspect of a social skills story is that it provides the child on the autism spectrum with a role model.

The vast majority of children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore strategies which suit children with autism spectrum best ARE visual like social stories.


Social stories can be used for more than learning social, imagination and communication skills, they can be used FOR TRANSITIONS, new routines, changes in routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger.

 

Using social stories for autism will help the child on the spectrum to better understand the thoughts, feelings and views of other people.


By implementing social stories for autism the child on the spectrum is more able to predict another person’s behaviour based on their actions.


Social stories present various situations and skills in a structured and clear manner in a way children with autism spectrum will find easier to understand. The social skills story should be written from the child’s perspective and follow a set formula of four sentence type: descriptive, perspective, direction and control.

Using social stories for autism will answer the important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what, helping reduce confusion and anxieties, making unpredictable situations more routine.

 

By using visual images and first person text the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which children with autism spectrum find easy to use.


Editable, and printable the social skills story will suit all ages and abilities, parents can personalize the social skills story using their child’s name and language that is familiar to them. No two children with autism are ever the same and normally some tweaking of social stories is needed.


To learn more about how using social stories for autism can benefit your child or student with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social stories have been used a s a strategy with autistic children for around twenty years giving positive results.

Other social stories for autistic children and teenagers can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Autistic supports

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010


Most autistic individuals struggle with the everyday common tasks and skills we undertake naturally without any pre-planning or thought in a lot of cases.

 

Due to their social skills deficits and in some cases sensory processing issues many autistic individuals have difficulties with communication, social interactions, imagination skills, as well as repetitive and obsessive behaviours.


Using autistic supports designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face is beneficial.


According to the latest autism treatment research autistic supports like visual support cues, social stories, PECS communication boards, flash cards and visual schedules all play a large pare in the overall development of social and communication skills as well as addressing sensory processing issues.


The latest autism treatment research suggests internet sites run by parents and professionals offering autistic support and other autistic resources can be of great comfort and help to many families struggling with an autistic child.


Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as google.

 

Having a child on the autism spectrum is not easy, many tasks and activities other families take for granted can be a real uphill struggle even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.


Help, is what most families need and readily available autistic supports which they can rely on daily to help them cope with and ease some of the daily stresses.


Help such as social stories, are readily available. What are social stories? The easiest way to describe a social story is just that “A social story” ¦Originally social stories were developed to help overcome communication difficulties.


But today social stories are one of the major autistic resources used to help teach and support individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits and deal with many of the sensory processing issues they face.

 

So what are social stories?. A social story describes the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images to show the skill in small easier to understand steps, a bit like a visual plan of the skills or situation describing it from the autistic person’s point of view in first person language.


A social story will answer the important “wh” questions -  who, where, why, when and what as we as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping individuals with autism get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.


So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.


Site which offer immediate access to social stories for a minimal fee like http://www.autismsocialstories.com are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families of a child with autism and individuals with autism.


Other sites offering social stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social stories with pictures

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010


Social Stories with pictures are excellent visual strategies that help children with autism spectrum disorder learn social and communication skills and behaviours, a social story can show a child with autism what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.


Social stories with pictures can help a child with autism overcome their fears or complete tasks which they need help understanding.


Social skills stories were developed originally as an aid to communication with autistic children. Social stories are now more widely used as visual strategies, an autistic resource and support, to help encourage and teach social, communication, imagination and sensory processing issues and behaviours.

 

A social story is a short visual story that has been written in a specific style and format.  It describes what happens in a specific social situation and presents information in a structured and consistent manner, by answering the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the feelings and thoughts of others.

 

Social stories with pictures or images and first person text are an excellen autistic resource giving clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation, without un-necessary fluff.

 

The goal of a social story is to attempt to address the “theory of mind” or social skills deficits by giving individuals some perspective on the thoughts, emotions and behaviours of others.

 

The theory of mind or social skills deficits is common to all individuals with autism spectrum disorder. For individuals with autism spectrum disorder having social skills deficits can hinder their social development. Having social skills deficits affect how an individual processes information, thinks, act, reacts, communicates, interacts and behaves.


Using social skills stories can address many of the issues faced by children with autism spectrum disorder on a daily basis and long term, the social story can help with changes to routines, transitions and communication difficulties.


Generally children with autism spectrum disorder have communication difficulties and may act oddly in social situations, not because they want to draw attention to themselves but because they may not understand that others can have different opinions to them, or that other people may want to do something different to what they want to do.


This can make social situations unpredictable and confusing to the child on the autism spectrum. Social stories therefore help the child on the autism spectrum understand what is happening and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.


Most children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, therefore by implementing social stories with pictures for social, communication and imagination skills that need teaching is beneficial and can act as an appropriate role model to the autistic child.


To find out more about how social stories can help an autistic child learn social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Alternative sites offering appropriate social stories with pictures can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social awareness in autism

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

Generally most children on the autism spectrum will appear aloof even rude at times, free of pretences, oblivious to public opinion and not concerned with making a good impression. Children on the autism spectrum are honest, if you do not want a straight forward answer don’t ask, they will not pretend and will not care if they hurt your feelings by being honest.

For children with autism a lack of social skills can lead in many cases to bullying, isolation and ridicule. A child on the autism spectrum will not worry about how others perceive them or whether they are considered cool or not by their peers.

 

A lack of social awareness in autism can be aided using supports designed to help teach children on the autism spectrum why we need social skills, what they are and how to conduct themselves.

 

Most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners and will respond better to visual information, such as visual autistic supports. There are many visual autistic supports available to use, but probably the most effective visual support for autistic children are social skills stories.

 

Social awareness in autism is a problem. Social skills stories tackle the ” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others.

 

For example: You’re at a friend’s house, your friend’s son is playing nicely with his toy, but your son wants that toy. You have tried to tell him to wait, you turn your back and there is a yell! Your friend’s son is crying nursing a bitten arm, while your son is happily playing with the toy. Your son has not waited to share or asked nicely, his social awareness skills are missing, he wanted the toy therefore he took the toy.

 

What do you do? Stay in the home and never go out? NO of cause not, you teach your child on the autism spectrum appropriate social skills. Easier said than done? MAYBE! But introducing visual autistic supports such as social skills stories can really make a difference to children with autism.

 

A social skills story is aimed specifically at children on the spectrum, written by experts, needs no formal training to use, can be printed out for ease of use and convenience, will slip into your bag to take with you while out. A social story can be edited and personalized to suit your child’s ability and language recognition.

 

Social skills stories are normally visually rich using visual images to show your child with first person text how and why we do what we do or why we use certain behaviours.

 

Social skills stories are used widely by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to teach children on the spectrum appropriate social skills, they are also used to aid communication difficulties and to reduce negative behaviours such as biting, stimming, asking inappropriate questions and so on.

 

Social skills stories can also be used to help prepare for changes to routines, unexpected events or happenings, hygiene issues, in fact almost all social, communication and imagination issues can be dealt with by using social skills stories as a strategy.

 

To learn more about how to use social skills stories as a strategy when teaching social awareness in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens