Posts Tagged ‘autistic supports’

Tackle healthy hygiene routines in teenagers with autism

Saturday, August 16th, 2014

Many parents of teenagers with autism worry that their teen will not “fit in”. Typically a teen with autism will find difficulties mastering hygiene skills and routines, especially surrounding puberty, such as autistic girls and menstruation.

Hygiene skills are essential life skills but for a teen with autism developing healthy hygiene habits can be challenging, therefore direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is essential.

For many parents of teenagers with autism puberty can be very stressful, parents look for ways to explain puberty and teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism. Parents consequently find autistic supports such as autistic social skills stories, perfect for helping them deal with this challenging period in their child’s life.

 

Autistic Social skills stories were first developed as a means of communication, today autistic social skills stories are used more widely to teach social, imagination and communication skills and behaviours as well as a means of communication.

 

Using appropriate language and visual images, social stories are used as autistic supports for individuals with an ASD and related conditions. The autistic social skills story provides the adolescent on the spectrum with a role model of exactly how to master the situation or skill.

 

The autistic social skills story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, where, why, what and when as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Concentrating on the main key points and cutting out all the frills the adolescent on the autistic spectrum will be able to see more clearly what is expected of them as well as what to expect from others, helping to relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Consequently many parents now use autistic social skills stories to tackle healthy hygiene routines in teenagers with autism.

 

Parents of teens with autism implement autistic social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:

 

● autism and going to the bathroom

● puberty and autistic girls

● autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant

● autistic girls and menstruation

● taking a shower

● taking a bath

 

As well as a means to tackle healthy hygiene routines in teenagers with autism, autistic social stories also help to teach other skills and behaviours and promote a healthy lifestyle.

 

To download autistic social skills stories to tackle healthy hygiene routines in teenagers with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Social stories on other social and communication difficulties can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

 

Download and Use Autistic Supports with Your Child on the Spectrum

Wednesday, March 28th, 2012

It is common for those with autism to have deficits in social awareness sills and behaviours.  This is due to the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits means the person’s social, communication and imagination skills are missing or not developed sufficiently.

This can cause many difficulties for those with autism, for example lacking social and communication skills can make it hard for them to make friends, ask questions and join in with play.

The majority of children on the autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand. It is therefore a good idea to use visual autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum.

There are various visual autistic supports available like social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the autism spectrum from sites like:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find various supports for autism which can be used effectively and with no need for any formal training.

Autistic supports such as social skills stories are designed to help you teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours that the child with autism is struggling with.

The social story WILL ACT like a visual plan or framework of the skill by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in those with autism.

The social story should be written from the child’s own perspective, in first person text and in a manner the child with autism can understand. It should be use images or pictures to show visually what is happening and why, this is important.

Generally social skills stories are written in word format to make editing easy, none of us typically use the same terminology and no two children are ever going to be the same, so the ability to edit is important.

Download and use autistic supports with your child on the spectrum such as social skills stories by visiting:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will also find picture communication cards and other supports for autism which can be used to help your child on the spectrum cope with and feel more comfortable in situations that he/she is finding stressful or confusing.

 

 

 

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Autistic Supports

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Autistic supports ARE used to help people with autism learn or remember social and communication skills and behaviours.

There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant of the autistic supports ARE VISUAL.

Typically people with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they USE visual images/pictures as their first language and speech/ words as secondary.

Therefore it is commonly believed that the most BENEFICIAL autistic supports ARE VISUAL. For example:

Social stories

Visual social story cards and folders

PECS

Communication cards – flash cards

…And so on…

For the purpose of this article we are looking at SOCIAL STORIES

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports which were first introduced around twenty years ago to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.

Today social stories for autism ARE widely used by teachers and parents to not only teach but re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

A social story is a short descriptive story which looks much like a comic script. The social story WILL describe a skill or situation from the perspective of the child with autism.

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports that use images/pictures to detail what is happening and why. Acting like a visual framework or plan the social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most kids with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate downloads of 100 social stories for kids with autism

Autistic Visual Supports

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Individuals with autism ARE typically “Visual Thinkers - Visual Learners”, this means that they think in pictures and images and use speech / words as a secondary language.

“I think in pictures. Words are like a second language to me…when somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures… One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills.” (Grandin, 1995).

Therefore presenting information and guidance visually will have a much better impact on individuals with autism.  There are a number of visual supports for autism which WILL help your child on the spectrum learn skills and behaviours that they find confusing, stressful or simply do not understand.

Autistic Visual Supports like: Social Skills Stories, Communication Picture Cards (flash cards), PECS and so on CAN be quickly and easily implemented and need NO formal training to use.

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive visual representations of a skill or behaviour. The social story breaks the skill down into smaller components, removes and un-necessary fluff or language and explains How and why something happens.

The social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, why and when and provides an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.


Autistic Visual Supports - Communication Picture Cards (flash cards)
ARE small laminated cards depicting an image or skill. For eample the Communication Picture Cards can be USED as an exchange -  the child with ASD hands over a picture card in retuen for the item on the card  -for example an apple at snack time and so on.

The Communication Picture Cards are also USED on visual timetables, as pointers around the home or in school, on chices boards, now and next boards and as a communication tool.

Both Social Skills Stories and Communication Picture Cards ARE available from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

To learn more about Autistic Visual Supports and how they can benefit your child with ASD visit today and download Social Skills Stories which can be adapted to suit individual needs, no two children are the smane and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore it is important that the social story you choose is editable.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Christmas and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Thursday, November 24th, 2011

For many children on the autism spectrum Christmas may be a time for stress and anxiety, with the on-going chaos and sensory overload the Festive Season provides.

However there are strategies that parents of autistic children can put in place to help their child cope.

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers and learners; this means that they use speech/language secondary and visual information as a primary means of communication.

So how does this help us at Christmas!

Generally for children on the autism spectrum Christmas is unpredictable, and it is this unpredictability that CAN cause the most distress.  

Using VISUAL autistic supports can help.

Characteristically children with autism spectrum disorder prefer structure and routines and dislike changes. Visual autistic supports CAN help balance the unpredictability of Christmas and make the Festive Season more predictable and structured.

Commonly parents of autistic children struggle to find suitable supports for Christmas and autism spectrum disorder. However, the internet NOW makes it a lot easier for parents to source suitable information and autism supports.

Using autism supports for Christmas

 

Visual Timetables:  Can be used to show a count-down to Christmas, the visual timetable can be used to help the child with ASD visually see what is happening each day on the run up to Christmas, for example buying the tree, putting up the tree, decorating the house, a school play, party and so on.

Photos:  Show your child with ASD photographs of last year and how you celebrated to remind them of how the Festive Season is going to be.

Visual Social Story Cards:  Can be introduced to help the child with ASD deal with changes to routines, learning new skills and coping with unpredictability. Visual social story cards ARE small laminated story cards which act like a framework of a skill or situation for example the school play. The story card can help the child to understand what is happening and what is expected of them.

Autism social skills stories:  Probably the most significant of the autism supports for Christmas. Autism social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “ HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social skills story is a short descriptive story from the autistic child’s point of view which uses visual images to show how and why something is happening and how the autistic child can deal with this, as well as what other people will be expecting of them.

Visual flash cards - PECS:  These can be used to help communication difficulties during the festive season.

There are of cause other visual autistic supports that can be sourced on  the internet.

Christmas need not be too stressful once the right visual autistic supports are put in place. To find suitable autistic supports like: Autism social skills stories for Christmas as well as visual social story cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

These Autism social skills stories for Christmas CAN be edited, personalized, downloaded and printed for convenience.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

Autism Visual social story cards

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

Typically a child on the spectrum WILL have difficulties with communication both verbal and non-verbal this is due to social skills deficits and is a common symptom of autism.

Children with autism ARE generally visual learners or visual thinkers, this means they think in pictures and use speech/words as a second language.

Generally parents and teachers report that the more information is moved from verbal to visual, the more successful children with autism ARE in understanding the information. This follows in ALL aspects of the child’s life and environment.

Autistic visual supports ARE introduced to HELP the child on the spectrum overcome social skills deficits and deal with the situations and skills they struggle with.

There ARE various “autistic visual supports” that can be used in the home, at school, and in the community.

For example:

Social skills stories;

Visual support cards

Flash cards and MORE…

Social skills stories ARE short visual description much like a comic script of a skill or situation. The social skills story uses images/pictures like a visual step by step plan which breaks the skill into smaller relevant sections and uses images to describe the skill.

The social skills story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of marked weakness in kids with autism.

Visual support cards work in the same manner as social skills stories by showing kids with autism what to expect and by offering explanations and possible responses.

The autism visual social story cards are small laminated cards about 9cm x 12cm which break the skill into small sections, with each section (part) of the skill displayed on each card, which are then flipped over like a comic book.

The autism visual social story cards CAN be very handy due to their size, making them portable and convenient to use.

Flash cards are used in the same manner as PECS cards as a means of communication. The flash card will display an image/picture, the child on the spectrum can show the parent/teacher the card. So for example at snack time the child may show the teacher a card displaying an apple, the teacher will take the card and exchange it for an apple, and so on.

All these “autistic visual supports” need no formal training to use and are easy to implement. You can see examples and gather more information as well as download of social skills stories from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Address healthy hygiene habits in teens with autism

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Scores of parents of teens with autism worry that they will not “fit in”. This concern is heightened by the autistic teenager’s difficulties in mastering hygiene abilities and routines, particularly hygiene difficulties surrounding puberty, such as autistic girls and menstruation.
Hygiene abilities are essential life abilities but for lots of autistic teenagers developing healthy hygiene habits can be difficult . As a result direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is important.
For a lot of parents of young adults with autism puberty can be very stressful, parents look for ways to clarify puberty and educate healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism. Parents turn increasingly towards autistic supports like as social skills stories, designed to assist them to deal with this challenging period in their child’s life.

Social abilities stories were originally developed as a means of communication, but soon grew in popularity and use. At present social abilities stories are used more extensively to teach social, imagination and communication abilities and behaviours as well as a method of communication.

Using appropriate language and visual images, social stories are used as autistic supports for individuals with an ASD and similar conditions. The social story offers the teen with autism with a role model of precisely how to master the situation or skill.

The social story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, where, why, what and when as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, emotions and thoughts of others. Focusing on the foremost key questions and cutting out all the frills, individuals with an ASD respond well to autistic supports such as social stories, which relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more at ease with and in the situation.

Consequently many parents of teens with autism make use of social skills stories to instruct healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism.

Parents of autistic teens put into practice social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:

? autism and going to the bathroom
? puberty and autistic girls
? autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant
? autistic girls and menstruation
? taking a shower
? taking a bath

As well as addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism, social stories also help to teach many autistic hygiene issues, all significant to a healthy life style.

To download social abilities stories for dealing with healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism as well as addressing healthy hygiene issues in autistic teens you can visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

From this website you can instantly  download 20 social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teens and children.

Other social skills stories for autistic teens dealing with puberty, school, friendships and other related concerns are found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Social stories on other social and communication difficulties can be found at:
http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Autistic supports

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010


Most autistic individuals struggle with the everyday common tasks and skills we undertake naturally without any pre-planning or thought in a lot of cases.

 

Due to their social skills deficits and in some cases sensory processing issues many autistic individuals have difficulties with communication, social interactions, imagination skills, as well as repetitive and obsessive behaviours.


Using autistic supports designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face is beneficial.


According to the latest autism treatment research autistic supports like visual support cues, social stories, PECS communication boards, flash cards and visual schedules all play a large pare in the overall development of social and communication skills as well as addressing sensory processing issues.


The latest autism treatment research suggests internet sites run by parents and professionals offering autistic support and other autistic resources can be of great comfort and help to many families struggling with an autistic child.


Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as google.

 

Having a child on the autism spectrum is not easy, many tasks and activities other families take for granted can be a real uphill struggle even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.


Help, is what most families need and readily available autistic supports which they can rely on daily to help them cope with and ease some of the daily stresses.


Help such as social stories, are readily available. What are social stories? The easiest way to describe a social story is just that “A social story” ¦Originally social stories were developed to help overcome communication difficulties.


But today social stories are one of the major autistic resources used to help teach and support individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits and deal with many of the sensory processing issues they face.

 

So what are social stories?. A social story describes the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images to show the skill in small easier to understand steps, a bit like a visual plan of the skills or situation describing it from the autistic person’s point of view in first person language.


A social story will answer the important “wh” questions -  who, where, why, when and what as we as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping individuals with autism get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.


So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.


Site which offer immediate access to social stories for a minimal fee like http://www.autismsocialstories.com are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families of a child with autism and individuals with autism.


Other sites offering social stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social awareness in autism

Tuesday, July 13th, 2010

Generally most children on the autism spectrum will appear aloof even rude at times, free of pretences, oblivious to public opinion and not concerned with making a good impression. Children on the autism spectrum are honest, if you do not want a straight forward answer don’t ask, they will not pretend and will not care if they hurt your feelings by being honest.

For children with autism a lack of social skills can lead in many cases to bullying, isolation and ridicule. A child on the autism spectrum will not worry about how others perceive them or whether they are considered cool or not by their peers.

 

A lack of social awareness in autism can be aided using supports designed to help teach children on the autism spectrum why we need social skills, what they are and how to conduct themselves.

 

Most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners and will respond better to visual information, such as visual autistic supports. There are many visual autistic supports available to use, but probably the most effective visual support for autistic children are social skills stories.

 

Social awareness in autism is a problem. Social skills stories tackle the ” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others.

 

For example: You’re at a friend’s house, your friend’s son is playing nicely with his toy, but your son wants that toy. You have tried to tell him to wait, you turn your back and there is a yell! Your friend’s son is crying nursing a bitten arm, while your son is happily playing with the toy. Your son has not waited to share or asked nicely, his social awareness skills are missing, he wanted the toy therefore he took the toy.

 

What do you do? Stay in the home and never go out? NO of cause not, you teach your child on the autism spectrum appropriate social skills. Easier said than done? MAYBE! But introducing visual autistic supports such as social skills stories can really make a difference to children with autism.

 

A social skills story is aimed specifically at children on the spectrum, written by experts, needs no formal training to use, can be printed out for ease of use and convenience, will slip into your bag to take with you while out. A social story can be edited and personalized to suit your child’s ability and language recognition.

 

Social skills stories are normally visually rich using visual images to show your child with first person text how and why we do what we do or why we use certain behaviours.

 

Social skills stories are used widely by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to teach children on the spectrum appropriate social skills, they are also used to aid communication difficulties and to reduce negative behaviours such as biting, stimming, asking inappropriate questions and so on.

 

Social skills stories can also be used to help prepare for changes to routines, unexpected events or happenings, hygiene issues, in fact almost all social, communication and imagination issues can be dealt with by using social skills stories as a strategy.

 

To learn more about how to use social skills stories as a strategy when teaching social awareness in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

How to teach social skills to autistic children

Monday, July 12th, 2010


Social skills are learnt naturally through socialization, we watch people and learn through experience, our environment, peers and families.

 

The ability to learn social skills naturally is missing in autistic children and therefore they need to learn social skills directly through supports, like for example social skills stories.

 

Social skills stories show us how to teach social skills to autistic children, such as holding a conversation, understanding nick names, sharing, respecting personal space, taking turns and so on.


Social stories teach the autistic person both verbal and nonverbal communication skills and behaviours which will help them act appropriately in social situations. For example social skills stories teach social skills to individuals on the spectrum such as waving goodbye, saying hello, lining up, in school assembly, whilst out shopping and so on.

Individuals on the spectrum do not read subtle cues contained in social interactions, such as how to tell when someone wants to change the topic of conversation or shift to another activity.

By teaching the autistic person to read social cues you will provide them with the knowledge to determine how to act in various situations or why to perform certain skills such as good hygiene habits or visiting the dentist.

Consequently, many parents looking at methods on how to teach social skills to autistic children turn to autistic supports such as social stories as a means of not only teaching social skills but as a means of communicating also.

Social stories answer the important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into verbal and nonverbal communication, plus an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

Using social stories as a strategy to teach an autistic child social and communication skills is beneficial. Research shows social stories as a strategy improves positive behaviours and reduces negative behaviours and anxiety.

To learn more about social stories as a strategy visit:

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com and learn how to teach social skills to autistic children using these autistic supports. Easy to use and with no need for any kind of training to use social stories are printable, editable and can be personalized for convenience and ease of use.

Alternativelly social stories can be found at any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Daily struggles of autistic children can affect the entire family

Saturday, July 10th, 2010

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects a person’s ability to process sensory input, communicate and use imagination skills.

So what are the daily struggles of autistic children which can affect the entire family?

Probably the biggest hurdle faced by families with autistic children is the child’s issues with social functioning, for example an autistic child may not recognise emotions, feelings, be reluctant to accept changes, need structured routines, prefer to be solitary and have an unwillingness to participate in social functions etc.

For most children with autism communication both verbal and nonverbal is troublesome, for example they may not recognise humour, wit, jokes etc. Children with autism tend not to recognise nonverbal communications either such as gestures, facial expression and body language.

Many children with autism display unusual behaviours, for example repetitive stereotypical movements, obsessions sometimes with odd or unusual items such as clock mechanisms, timetables etc.

Sometimes the daily struggles of autistic children can affect the entire family in many ways for example, visiting grandparents, going on holiday, a birthday party, anniversary; even just going out shopping can all be difficult and stressful for a family with an autistic child.

There are autistic supports available that can help you deal with and find solutions for many if not all the daily struggles you are having within your family unit.

Probably the most effective of the autistic supports that are available are social stories, these are normally written by experts, can be edited, personalized and printed, and do not need any kind of training to use.

Social stories are short visual scripts much like a comic script which details a certain skill or situation that needs addressing, for example visiting grandparents, shopping, a dental visit, going to the zoo etc. The social story breaks the situation or skill down into small sections, removes the fluff and uses first person text with visual images to detail the key points of the skill or situation to make it understandable and less frightening or stressful for the autistic child.

The social story answers the important “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what; as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions others may be feeling, giving the autistic child a chance to comprehend and feel more comfortable with and in the situation, which should reduce stress and unwanted behaviours.

To learn more about social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/potty

Address healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism

Thursday, June 24th, 2010


Many parents of teenagers with autism worry that they will not “fit in”. This worry is heightened by the autistic teenager’s difficulties in mastering hygiene skills and routines, especially hygiene issues with autism puberty, such as autistic girls and menstruation.

Hygiene skills are essential life skills but for many autistic teenagers developing healthy hygiene habits can be challenging. Consequently direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism is essential.

For many parents of teenagers with autism puberty can be very stressful, parents look for ways to explain puberty and teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism. Parents turn increasingly towards autistic supports such as social skills stories, designed to help them deal with this challenging period in their child’s life.


Social skills stories were first developed as a means of communication, but soon grew in popularity and use. Today social skills stories are used more widely to teach social, imagination and communication skills and behaviours as well as a means of communication.


Using appropriate language and visual images, social stories are used as autistic supports for individuals with an ASD and related conditions. The social story provides the teen with autism with a role model of exactly how to master the situation or skill.

 

The social story answers the “wh” questions ~ who, where, why, what and when as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Concentrating on the main key points and cutting out all the frills, individuals with an ASD respond well to autistic supports such as social stories, which relieve anxieties and make the teen with autism more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Consequently many parents of teenagers with autism use social skills stories to teach healthy hygiene habits and routines in autism.

 

Parents of autistic teens implement social skills stories to help with autistic hygiene issues such as:


*autism and going to the bathroom

*puberty and autistic girls

*autistic teenage hygiene ~ using deodorant

*autistic girls and menstruation

 

*taking a shower

 

*taking a bath

 

As well as addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism, social stories also help to teach many autistic hygiene issues, all relevant to a healthy lifestyle.

 

To download social skills stories for addressing healthy hygiene habits in teenagers with autism as well as overcoming healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers you can visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

From this website you can now instantly download 20 social skills stories for healthy hygiene issues in autistic teenagers and children.

 

Other social skills stories for autistic teenagers dealing with autism puberty, school, friendships and other related issues are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Social stories on other social and communication difficulties can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Social stories for kids with autism

Saturday, January 23rd, 2010


Unlike typically developing children, kids with autism spectrum disorder do not naturally learn social or communication skills.  As typically developing individuals we learn and use verbal and non-verbal communication automatically, we use expression and body language to convey information sometimes without even realizing we are doing so.

 

Using facial expressions and body language we can portray love, happiness, sadness, contentment and fear.

 

Without social and communication skills we would be left confused and inevitably social mistakes and blunders would be the norm. Our interpretations of how or what others are thinking or feeling gives us the ability and knowledge to read what comes next, this ability is missing in autism.

 

Generally for kids with autism spectrum disorder the world is confusing, and with a lack of social and communication skills their ability to be understood or communicate can be hindered and often confused.

 

Unlike their typically developing peers the autistic child finds it difficult to read situations or interpret expression and non verbal communications. For kids with autism social prompts are easily missed or mistaken, their ability to understand behaviors such as sharing, taking turns even making friends is impaired and in some cases completely missing.

 

Therefore parents, care givers, teachers and other people involved with the care of kids with autism find great relief in autistic visual supports that can help them to teach the autistic child social and communication skills effectively.


Autistic visual supports such as social stories for kids with autism were developed around twenty years ago to help re-enforce and teach social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The images and pictures used in social stories for kids with autism are powerful re-enforcers, and as such are probably the most significant resource used for teaching appropriate social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Autistic visual supports such as social skills stories for kids with autism provide visual cues and representations along with appropriate text. The social skills stories for kids with autism also provide support and understanding using appropriate language, written in first person text from the autistic person’s point of view. Social stories use a specific defined formula.

 

Research shows us significant numbers of autistic children benefit from the implementation of social skills stories for kids with autism and therefore many teachers, parents and other professionals now rely on these autistic visual supports to help them teach and re-enforce social and communication skills.

 

 

To get more information on autistic visual supports and download social skills stories visit any of the following site:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com