Posts Tagged ‘autistic resources’

Autism Visual Supports

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Commonly the vast majority of children with autism WILL struggle with the everyday tasks and skills that a typically developing individual will have NO PROBLEMS with, like for example making friends, asking questions appropriately, joining in play and so on.

It’s mainly due to the individuals social skills deficits which ARE common to ALL with Autism Spectrum Disorder and in many cases sensory processing issues that many children with autism have difficulties with otherwise “normal” skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that using autism visual supports CAN be beneficial. Autism visual supports are designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face daily.

Recent autism treatment research suggests that autism visual supports like visual support cards, social stories, PECS communication boards and visual schedules all HAVE a large part to play in the treatment and development of social and communication skills for many autistic kids.

Parents CAN NOW find sites offering autism visual supports which ARE run by parents and professionals that offer support and other autistic resources.

Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing and through Directories.

The World CAN be a very confusing place to a child on the spectrum,   many of the everyday skills we take for granted  a child with autism CAN FIND difficult and stressful.

Typically many families with an autistic child can find even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.

Help, is what most families with an autistic child need as well as trusted supports that have been proven to work.  

Help such as social stories ARE beneficial. What are social stories?

Probably the most significant autism visual supports ARE social stories. A social story is much like a role model or visual plan used to describe a skill or situation in terms of relevant social cues and prompts.

Today social stories are EASY TO IMPLEMENT need no formal training to use and can be edited to suit all terminology and autistic kids no matter where on the spectrum scale they fall.

As one of the major autistic resources used to help teach, support and HELP individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits social skills stories ARE available to download TODAY from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A social skills story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping the autistic child get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.

So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social skills story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social skills story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.

Sites which offer IMMEDIATE ACCESS to autism visual supports like social stories and visual support cards for a minimal fee like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families and individuals with autism.

Social stories for kids with autism

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

Social stories are stories specifically written for kids with autism to help them deal with specific issues.  They are ideal for kids with autism because they can be read again and again, autistic kids prefer repetition.


The social skills story provides the autistic child with accurate information in an easy to understand manner.


The skill or situation is broken down in to key points; the important social cues, and answers the key “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the  reactions the autistic child might expect to occur in the situation, the actions and reactions that might be expected of him, and why.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can be used for many situations and skills the child is struggling with; for example: answering questions, making friends, respecting personal space, even situations such as visiting Grandparents and the dentist, infact anything!

 

The objective being to increase the child’s understanding of, make him more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation they are having problems with.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can act like a visual planner, because they are visually rich with images or pictures they are easy to follow. Social skills stories are always written in first person text and from the ASD child’s point of view.

 

East to edit and personalize social skills stories are convenient and can be used in all situations including school and at home. Parents are able to edit the stories and add language that the ASD child’s familiar with.

 

The social skills story is printable therefore it can be easily transported. Acting like a role model a social skills story can answer tricky questions around puberty, on special occasions, about hygiene issues and so on.

 

Research suggests kids with autism respond extremely well to social skills stories.

 

For more info on how to use social skills stories and to gain access to downloads of these autistic resources visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Or for more other autistic resources http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Autistic supports

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010


Most autistic individuals struggle with the everyday common tasks and skills we undertake naturally without any pre-planning or thought in a lot of cases.

 

Due to their social skills deficits and in some cases sensory processing issues many autistic individuals have difficulties with communication, social interactions, imagination skills, as well as repetitive and obsessive behaviours.


Using autistic supports designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face is beneficial.


According to the latest autism treatment research autistic supports like visual support cues, social stories, PECS communication boards, flash cards and visual schedules all play a large pare in the overall development of social and communication skills as well as addressing sensory processing issues.


The latest autism treatment research suggests internet sites run by parents and professionals offering autistic support and other autistic resources can be of great comfort and help to many families struggling with an autistic child.


Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as google.

 

Having a child on the autism spectrum is not easy, many tasks and activities other families take for granted can be a real uphill struggle even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.


Help, is what most families need and readily available autistic supports which they can rely on daily to help them cope with and ease some of the daily stresses.


Help such as social stories, are readily available. What are social stories? The easiest way to describe a social story is just that “A social story” ¦Originally social stories were developed to help overcome communication difficulties.


But today social stories are one of the major autistic resources used to help teach and support individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits and deal with many of the sensory processing issues they face.

 

So what are social stories?. A social story describes the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images to show the skill in small easier to understand steps, a bit like a visual plan of the skills or situation describing it from the autistic person’s point of view in first person language.


A social story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as we as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping individuals with autism get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.


So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.


Site which offer immediate access to social stories for a minimal fee like http://www.autismsocialstories.com are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families of a child with autism and individuals with autism.


Other sites offering social stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Treatment goals autism

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Research into the latest on autism treatment, shows families and teachers support the uses of visual strategies as a means of teaching and supporting social and communication skills in children with autism.


The priority treatment goals autism are to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, achievable using autistic visual supports like social stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.


The predominant characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorders are impairments in an individual’s of social skills, communication difficulties and interaction, along with sensory processing issues, restricted and repetitive activities and interests. This is often referred to as social skills deficits or the theory of mind.


Research shows many parents worry about their child’s ability to make and maintain friendships which often proves difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder.


Probably the main treatment goals for autism are to help overcome social skills deficits – the theory of mind and ease family life and stresses, as well as to help the autistic individual to reach their full potential in quality of life and functional independence.


Achievable with the help of services and autistic visual supports and resources designed specifically to help overcome many of the deficits associated with this disorder. Such as social skills stories specifically designed to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues as well as communication difficulties.

 

Parents report significant improvements in social skills understanding once social skills stories have been implemented.

 

A social story follows a specific pattern of sentence type: descriptive, directive, perspective and control sentences. Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, since then their use has expanded and today they are classed as one of the major autistic resources for teaching and supporting social skills learning.


The latest on autism treatment shows a popular increase in the implementation of social stories to address social skills deficits. Social stories are written in first person text, use visual images or pictures and are short descriptive no fluff stories.

 

The goal of the social story is to help the autistic child better understand a social situation, skills, behaviour or communication skill they are struggling to master or cope with.

 

The situation or skill etc. is broken down into relevant social cues with appropriate images in an almost comic like style to show the autistic child by answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.


To learn more about the treatment goals autism and the latest on autism treatments like social skills stories and visual flash cards, Pecs and so on visit sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids


Visiting the dentist with an autistic child

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

For many of us visiting the dentist is quite a scary thought which sparks an un-rational fear.  If parents have an un-rational fear, generally children will pick up on this and so the circle continues.


However this is not the case with autism, an autistic child will not generally pick up on their parents feelings and emotions. The ability to read facial expression and body language is missing in children with autism this is often referred to as the theory of mind.


So why for many parents is visiting the dentist with an autistic child so difficult?


Social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common to autism. Autism is a developmental disability affecting an individual for life. Autism affects how the autistic individual thinks, acts, reacts, communication, imagination and how they process information.

 

Therefore looking at why visiting the dentist with an autistic child may be so difficult: The first consideration when taking an autistic child to the dentist many parents face is why do I need to see a dentist? This man or woman wearing a white coat, who expects them to lay in a chair with a bright light shining in their face, while they look into their mouth using strange equipment.


Although you yourself understand why it is important to have a regular check-up and keep your teeth and gums healthy. Your special needs child may not understand what healthy hygiene habits are, and indeed the importance of having healthy teeth and gums.


Finding autistic resources especially designed for autistic individuals that will help you explain the importance of dental check ups and healthy hygiene habits in autism can be difficult. But for many parents autistic resources such as social skills stories are useful for showing and explaining just these kinds of things.


So what do you need to be aware of when taking an autistic child to the dentist? Once you have actually got your child with autism in the dentist…


Your first hurdle could be the bright lights in the reception area, noise are their children waiting in the reception, other patients arriving, chatting, can you hear dentists treating other patients? Is there a buzzer or bell can you hear the receptionist on the phone while you’re waiting, all these small things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


Many autistic children are sensitive with sensory processing issues being common to autism. The mouth is one of the most sensitive areas on your body, so anything being put in or done to their mouth may cause an anxiety trigger for your special needs child.


The feel of the cold instrument entering their mouth, the drill sensation, the water spraying, the taste of the mouth wash or paste, all these things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


The feel of the dentist chair, the rubber gloves the dentist will wear, the bright light above their face, even the goggles they may be asked to wear are these coloured, if so this could also be an anxiety trigger for the ASD child.


Is the dentist wearing perfume or aftershave, the deodorant the nurse or dentist is wearing, the smell in the dentist room, even reception area, the lady opposite you waiting maybe she has perfume on that will trigger an anxiety attack for the ASD child all these things can have an affect when taking an autistic child to the dentist.


Maybe the dentist is not aware of the affects of autism and autistic sensory stimuli. Autism is growing in recognition but a lot of health professionals are still not aware of the affects of autism or autistic sensory stimuli and what they can do to help ease any anxieties.


As well as all these factors, probably the biggest factor of all is actually why…for many children with autism understanding why they are even there, why they need to let the dentist look in their mouth. Using social skills stories will help explain this before you even step foot through the dentists door.

 

It is always a good idea to speak with the dentist before taking your child along, explain the affects of autism, what autism is and how your autistic child reacts to certain sensory stimuli. Explain sensory processing issues and that your autistic child is sensitive to stimuli and how this can be helped while your ASD child is there.


For example is there a private waiting room away from the busy reception area. That could be quieter and less likely to trigger anxieties before they even get into the dentists treatment room.

 

Can the instruments be warmed under warm water before they are used in your child’s mouth can your special needs child bring their own sun glasses along to protect their eyes rather than wear the dental glasses.


That way you can introduce the sun glasses at home before the visit, giving your special needs child time to get used to them before the check up.

 

Do you have ear muffs that could block out the noise of the drill? Ask for the mouth rinse to be plain water.


All these things need consideration before visiting the dentist with an autistic child.


One excellent autistic resource you will need to implement especially before the dental visit is a social skills story. The social skills story can help explain why they need to visit the dentist and some of the things that will happen while they are there. Research shows many parents use social stories to help prepare an autistic child to visit the dentist.


Social skills stories will give your ASD child clear instructions and explanations as to what is happening, answering the “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what showing visually what is happening, what they can expect from others at the time, and what others will be expecting of them.

 

Armed with a social skills story and the other suggestions I have made you can help your autistic child cope adequately visiting the dentist. Social stories are an autistic resource that is used for helping a child with autism cope with many other skills, situations, activities and events that they will come across in their everyday lives, things we take for granted as “normal”. But to an autistic child can be distressing even frightening.


For a carefully planned and written Autism dentist social story visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find more information on social skills stories that will help your child with autism cope with and understand social situations they may be struggling with like for example Autism dentist social story

Social stories for getting a haircut,

Social stories for a hospital visit

Social stories for students and so on


Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get downloads of 100 social skills stories.

Resources and students with autism

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by significant deficits in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills, abilities and behaviors.

 

Students with autism spectrum disorder range in abilities and disabilities, from students with autism spectrum disorder that have severe intellectual disabilities to students that are intellectually gifted. With appropriate resources all students with autism can learn.

 

Although some autistic students may present educational disabilities and challenges, appropriate resources and students with autism can help them learn well, teacher implement systematic, and individualized teaching practices. As well as appropriate autistic resources such as PECS, daily schedules and social stories for autistic students.

 

Teachers of autistic students can help their autistic students by providing clear structure to the environment. Provide autistic resources and tools such as PECS, schedules and social stories ensure that the flow of lessons and activities is understandable and predictable.


Teachers of autistic students should have a clear focus on building and developing social and communication skills. This will help the student with autism develop skills for their current and future life in school, college, work, home, and community.


Students with autism display deficits in understanding and using speech as well as communication both verbal and non-verbal.


All autism classroom accommodations need to be expressed in a way that the student with autism can understand. This can be achieved through the use of schedules and social skills stories for autistic students.


Autistic children tend to be visual learners. In addition to providing autistic visual supports for understanding classroom expectations, many students with autism spectrum disorder will also need autistic visual supports to help them find means of communicating both verbally and non-verbally.

 

Generally all students with autism will have deficits with communication and may display difficulties expressing their needs and desires.


Teachers are finding the use of autistic visual supports such as social skills stories is helping students with autism cope within the school and classroom environment more efficiently. Social skills stories are actually helping students understand autism classroom accommodations easier as well as the rules of the school, plus what is expected of them throughout the day.

 

Social skills stories are used widely for autistic children and can now be downloaded straight from the internet. Sites offering autistic students school resources such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Are easy to navigate and offer excellent support to teachers of autistic students as well as parents and other professionals; resources and students with autism.

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories include:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Tips for teaching autistic children communication skills

Wednesday, October 14th, 2009


Generally most autistic children commonly face problems with communication skills. This is mainly due to the frequent speech and language problems associated with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The autistic child’s lack of communication skills can make interpretation and interaction with the child difficult for parents of autistic children and teachers.

 

No two autistic children are the same; therefore individuals will develop communication skills dependant on their own social and intellectual development.

 

While some children with autism may never develop speech, other children with autism may have extensive vocabularies and be able to express themselves regarding complex topics.

 

However, generally all autistic children will have some form of communication skills difficulty. This is normally noticeable with the child’s odd use of language, for example difficulty with intonation, rhythm, and word and sentence meaning.


Many parents of autistic children report their child may use echolalia, where they simply repeat what they have heard, even if they have been asked a question.

 

Others will use delayed echolalia, using the question previously posed in order to ask for what they want. For example, a child who had earlier been asked “are you thirsty?” may say “are you thirsty” at a later time to express his thirst.

 

Many verbal children with autism may say things without true information, expression, or content.

Many parents of autistic children also report their autistic child having a stock of phrases they use.

For example, a child may introduce him or herself at the beginning of conversations. Some autistic children use repetitive language they pick up from television shows, commercials, cartoons and other recorded dialogs.

Many kids with autism can speak extensively about a topic that they may be obsessed by and will not need the other person to answer they can become stuck on a topic and be unaware of the other person becoming bored or trying to change the subject.

Sometimes kids with autism will make up a voice like a robotic voice, some will use a deep voice, or a squeaky voice etc. rather than use their own voice.

There are tips for teaching autistic children communication skills and communication skills such as social skills stories for autistic children.


Social stories have been around for almost twenty years and are used affectively by parents and teachers for teaching autistic children communication skills both verbal and non-verbal.

 

Generally social skills stories for autistic children are written by experts using appropriate language, images and text that kids with autism can relate too and understand.

 

Most kids with autism are visual learners and will respond very well to social skills stories making them one of the most significant autistic resources for the treatment of verbal and non-verbal communications skills teaching of autistic individuals.

 

Many sites offer support to parents and teacher wishing to use appropriate autistic resources to help them find tips for teaching autistic children communication skills.


Sites that offer immediate download of social stories for autistic children that are maintained by experts such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com now offer immediate downloads of social stories for autistic children.

 

Such as making choices, having a conversation, asking questions, finding friends and so on, social stories can be used for various teachings of social skills not only communication.

 

To download social stories not only for autistic children but also preschool autistic toddlers, teens and asperger syndrome individuals visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents