Posts Tagged ‘autistic individuals’

Comprehending autism spectrum disorders

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Parents, teachers, caregivers and other professionals involved in the care and well being of an individual on the spectrum can find comprehending autism spectrum disorders confusing and stressful.

 

All children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will have the triad of autistic impairments in their ability to:

 

Socially interact

Communication difficulties

Imagination skills

 

Plus in most cases sensory processing issues which can affect an autistic individuals senses (taste, smell, touch, sound and sight). Most children with an ASD will also display obsessive and repetitive behaviours, will prefer routines and can become anxious if these routines change.

 

Children with an ASD also display marked difficulties with non-verbal and verbal communication. A child with autism will have difficulties comprehending the communication and language used by those around them as well difficulties in developing effective communication themselves.

 

Unlike typically developing children that learn social skills naturally, a child with autism will struggle socially. For many parents probably the hardest challenge they face is their child’s difficulty to understand the social behaviour of others. A child with autism will have difficulties displaying and comprehending appropriate socially accepted behaviours.

 

Generally most autistic individuals do not process information in the same manner as typically developing beings.  The opinions and thoughts of other are of no real consequence for the individual on the spectrum, which can cause frustrations and upset.

 

Consequently, comprehending autism spectrum disorders can be frustrating and stressful for those involved in the everyday care of an individual on the spectrum.

 

Research shows us however that although there is no cure for autism there are various treatments of autism that are available that can help overcome triad of autistic impairments.

 

Various treatments of autism like social skills stories work effectively addressing the triad of autistic impairments. They do this by showing the autistic child what to expect in certain situations or what is expected of them which reduces stress and helps control anxieties.

 

By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others a social skills stories visually explain using images and relevant social cues the skill or situation. All helping an autistic child to better understand and cope with the skill or situation that

They may be struggling with.   

 

To find a greater comprehending of autism spectrum disorders and how social skills stories can help address some of the issues faced by children with an ASD visit sites like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Friday, October 11th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social deficiencies these are common to autism; it is due to these social deficiencies that the autistic child may be unaware of the rules of social conduct, how to act in public or interactions. Even though all autistic individuals have social deficiencies the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

Having social deficiencies is common to autism and at times can leave the autistic child open to bullying especially at school.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language can also cause problems.

 

Generally kids with autism that display communication difficulties will misunderstand simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally. For example; metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “watch what you say”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to their social deficiencies sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However using treatments of autism for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be beneficial.

 

There are many treatments of autism available with social skills stories being probably the most significant for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are used effectively by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to help improve and teach social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours as well as addressing communication difficulties, in children with autism.

 

Social skills stories are treatments of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

Social skills stories help overcome social deficiencies by tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, by helping the child with autism learn appropriate social skills and behaviours.

 

The autism social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan detailing the key points or goals, allowing them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with and less likely to become stressed or agitated.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Terrible Teens – Dealing with Autistic Teenagers

Thursday, October 20th, 2011

For most parents, one of the most trying times in their lives is during their child’s teenage years. “The teenage years” and dealing with autistic teenagers is not easy!

When puberty hits, young adults go through serious changes in their bodies and minds, and parents have little or no control over many situations. In an autistic child, puberty is no different. Although your autistic child is not experiencing puberty in quite the same ways as others his or her age, major hormonal changes still occur in the body. This can lead to extreme results, and this can be either good or bad depending on how your child reacts to the new hormone levels.

One of the scariest side effects of changes for autistic teenagers is the onset of seizures.

Many autistic individuals experience seizures from birth right through to adulthood. However, even if your ASD child does not suffer from these episodes, he or she may begin to experience seizures during puberty and afterwards, due to the new levels of hormones in their body.

Almost a quarter of autistic children experience seizures, but many go undetected because they are not textbook versions of seizures.

If you recognize that your ASD child is experiencing a seizure, you should contact your G.P., he/she will be able to prescribe medications or treatments which will help your autistic teen.

However, if the seizures are subconsciously happening, you and your child may not realize it. The result of these small hidden seizures can be a loss in function, which can be disruptive, especially if you child was improving before puberty. Regular check-ups during puberty, therefore, are extremely important.

The changes many autistic children go through are not necessarily be a bad thing. New hormone levels in the body and the other changes associated with puberty can help your autistic child grow and succeed in areas he or she normally had no skill or interest.

Many parents report that their teen’s behavior improved, and that learning in social settings has become easier.

The important thing about puberty is to learn to monitor the changes in your ASD child very carefully and to ask your doctor lots of questions.

Remember that puberty is a difficult experience for any young adult, and so it will be even more difficult for autistic individuals.

Try using supports for autism and puberty with your aspie teen. Supports like social stories ARE effective around this time of life.

Typically an aspie teen may not understand what is happening to them and CAN become withdrawn, stressed and feel isolated.

The benefit of using supports for autism and puberty like social skills stories for teenagers with autism is that the social story CAN become like a friend (a visual plan or framework) detailing to the teen with autism exactly what is happening and why as well as giving them possible outcomes and suggest behaviors

The social story will answer the “wh questions – who, what, why, where and when” as well as “HOW” and will offer the teen with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in many autistic individuals.

To learn more about The teenage years – dealing with autistic teenagers with supports for autism and puberty like social skills stories for teenagers with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

 

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Explain what social skills stories are

Tuesday, December 28th, 2010

Children with autism spectrum disorder HAVE social skills deficits and do not learn social and communication skills in the typical manner and unlike normally developing children do need direct teaching.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories ARE used to help teach children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills

 

Social skills stories are a powerful teaching strategy, a good social story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction, breaking it down into smaller easier to understand sections.

 

A social story will provide the child on the spectrum with accurate information which is important because a child on the spectrum will often find social situations confusing.

 

Intervention Strategies such as social skills stories can be used for various situations and skills that the child on the spectrum may be struggling with for example:  hygiene skills, making conversation, asking questions, respecting personal space, sharing, taking turns, recess, PE lessons and so on…

 

Using visual images a social story depicts the situation by means of relevant social cues and answers the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

 

It is probably easier to explain what social skills stories are by giving an example of how a social story can be implemented and used to help a child on the spectrum deal with a situation or skill that they are struggling with.

 

For example: your child with an ASD may struggle to make friends, this will be mainly due to their social skills deficits; having social skills deficits is common to autism. The social story can help the child with an ASD approach a potential friend and give them suggestions of possible outcomes, what to say and how to act as well as what the other child may expect of them i.e. respecting personal space etc.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories are implemented and used for children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories need no formal training to use, are normally written in word format or PDF, can be personalized and edited to make them suitable for all ages and abilities. No two autistic individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore social skills stories can need altering for different autistic individuals.

For a list of 100 downloadable social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

ASD Social Stories

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies which teach children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) self awareness, self help, calming and behaviour management skills as well as appropriate communication skills.

 

ASD social stories are written to help pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour. Unlike typically developing children a child on the spectrum will not naturally learn social and communication skills and behaviours and will NEED DIRECT TEACHING.

 

ASD social stories can be used for a wide variety of issues including hygiene, making friends, at school, out and about and in the home etc.

 

ASD Social stories are USED to help children on the autism spectrum cope with and plan for transitions, ask questions, hold conversations, go shopping and so on. Generally ASD social stories should contain images or photos, to help the child on the spectrum better understand what is being presented.

 

Mostly children on the autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, which means visual intervention strategies ARE much easier for them to understand.

 

Social stories will normally follow a set pattern of sentence type: Perspective, Descriptive, Directive, And Control sentences.

 

Social stories help teach a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling with by giving the child a clear outline much like a framework or visual plan of the skill or behaviour allowing them to visually see what is expected of them and why.

 

By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and by giving an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others.

 

This ability is missing in children with autism spectrum disorder and is often referred to as “mind blindness” as typically developing individuals we have a natural ability to read facial expression and body language and then determine what another person is feeling or thinking, this is missing in autistic individuals which can at times cause problems with social misunderstandings and so on.

 

Mostly autistic individuals live in a literal world and can be blind to the emotions and feelings of those around them making friendships hard to maintain and social rules hard to follow. By implementing ASD social stories YOU are able to help teach a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling to master. Acting like a role model a social story can be implemented easily and will need no formal training to use.

 

Most ASD social stories can be edited as no two autistic individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our own child etc, therefore a social story should be editable and easy to personalize.

ASD social stories can be printed for convenience of use, making them easy to use everywhere and anywhere they are needed.

 

Social stories ARE excellent visual intervention strategies for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and can be found on sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

By using social stories with your ASD child you can help reduce stress and unwanted behaviours and teach new skills leading to positive results.

 

To find out more about how a social story WILL HELP your ASD child visit any of these following sites: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills