Posts Tagged ‘autistic impairments’

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

 

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Children on the autistic spectrum do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with children on the autistic spectrum.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autism child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after receiving a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children on the autistic spectrum learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, having autism and making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children on the autistic spectrum. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the child with ASD always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the child with ASD.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like having autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Enhancing social skills in autistic children

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

For the vast majority of autistic children social skills ARE either missing or NEED improving.

This is due to the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits, which ARE common to autism to varying degrees

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect how the child on the spectrum acts, re-acts, thinks and behaves.

Methods for enhancing social skills in autistic children ARE generally visual. This is because most children on the spectrum ARE visual learners and thinkers and will tend to use language secondary.

Visual supports for autism such as: social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards etc ARE visual supports which can be introduced simply and need NO formal training to use.

Characteristically children on the spectrum find visual supports for autism beneficial. Social skills stories ARE short descriptive visual supports which describe a skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story looks much like a comic script, using images/pictures and short precise pieces of text. The social story is always from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, using first person text in short sentences.

The social story answers the “wh” questions: who, what, Why, where, and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight wherever possible into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

Social skills stories CAN be used for a wide variety of situations or skills such as: asking questions, calming down, hygiene issues, self-help skills and so on…

For many children on the spectrum visual supports for autism ARE invaluable and can be treated like visual plans or frameworks to help them cope with and learn skills and behaviours which cause stress and anxiety.

To learn more about visual supports for autism like social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards as well as other visual supports visual http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Behaviour management for kids with autism

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

It is important to remember it is more useful to put strategies in place to help prevent inappropriate behaviours before they happen than to try and deal with the behaviour once it has occurred.

It is also important to remember that ALL behaviour displayed by kids with autism is for a reason an internal or external factor NEVER just because as with typically developing children.

Due to the triad of autistic impairments children with autism have a lack of social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that because of the triad of autistic impairments that any behaviour management for kids with autism is devised to help the child with ASD understand and cope with skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand and manage.

Help such as visual intervention strategies, which ARE used to help teach social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

There are many different positive behaviour supports like visual intervention strategies such as: Social Skills Stories, Visual Social Story Cards, Flash Cards, PECS and so on…

Using Positive behaviour supports for ASD is beneficial.

For example positive behaviour supports for ASD can teach self-help skills, choice and decision making, routine changes, social awareness, communication skills and environmental changes as well as much more.

Probably one of the major strategies used is social skills stories – these are short descriptive pieces of text which can be used to help the child with ASD feel more comfortable with and in a situation.

Social Skills Stories use visual images to help explain a situation, skill, behaviour or event from the child’s own perspective. Typically kids with ASD are visual thinkers and learners; this means that they understand visual information easier than that which is written or spoken.

Noticeably kids with ASD have communication difficulties and find reading facial expressions and body language confusing, this is also due to their social impairments.

Having social impairments can make friendships difficult to build and maintain again positive behaviour supports for ASD can help alleviate this issue and help the child with autism develop friendships.

The social story will help answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistics.

The social story can act like a visual framework or plan of the skill being taught, it will focus on the key points or cues and suggest possible outcomes for the child with autism to follow.

To learn more about behaviour management for kids with autism and how social skills stories WILL help visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Typically children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills this is due to the Triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.
The Triad of autistic impairments affect three main areas of development: Social skills, Communication skills and Imagination skills.

It is these deficits that make it difficult for a child on the spectrum to interact socially and can make the child on the spectrum appear rude even aloof at times.
Treatments for autism ARE put in place to HELP overcome social skills deficits. Probably the most significant of the various treatments for autism available ARE “Social Skills Stories”

Generally social skills stories are written for a specific task or skill and WILL detail that skill or task in specific terms giving focus to the social cues.

Much like a Role Model or Visual Plan of the skill a breakdown of the skill or task into smaller sections like this video example of one of our social stories:

The social skills story aims to answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as How and to give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness for most autistic people.

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism ARE social stories made simpler.

Social story cards are simply a social story broken into sections, with each section then put onto a separate card the cards are then shown individually like turning the pages of a book.

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism ARE easy to USE, and can be put in place in the same manner as a regular social story.

To learn more and see a picture example of social story cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find a section dedicated to this simpler version of the regular social story.

Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic impairments.

What are Autistic Impairments?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

ASD in children

Friday, June 10th, 2011

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a neurological disorder which affects more boys than girls. Generally ASD is diagnosed before a child reaches three years of age.

ASD in children will typically affect how the child interacts, behaves and communicates with others. This is commonly known as the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits and will affect all children with an ASD, in varying degrees.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments are typical to Autism Spectrum Disorder and can be treated with intervention strategies designed to help children with an ASD overcome their social skills deficits.

Intervention strategies like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards are commonly used to help the ASD child understand and cope with situations and skills that they are struggling with or find stressful, like for example recess, asking questions and making friends.

Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Grey as a means of communication with the children she was working.

Social skills stories comprise of four sentence types; Perspective, Directive, Descriptive and control and will generally follow a set formula.

Typically for the ASD child social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with an ASD.

No two autistic kids will ever be the same, and we all use different terminology, therefore most social skills stories are written in word format which means that they are easy to edit.

Generally most autistic kids are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures. It is therefore important to use visual supports like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards.

ASD in children is not cure-able but by using visual supports like social skills stories YOU will find teaching an ASD child social skills can be considerably improved.

Social skills stories use first person text and visual images in a manner that all kids with autism will find easy to understand. A social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan.

Parents, caregivers, teachers and assistants can use any social skills story without any formal training. They can be downloaded, edited, printed and implemented easily and for most situations and skills the child is struggling with.

To learn more teaching an ASD child social skills using social stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find social stories to download.

 

Teaching children on the autism spectrum

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Many people with autism are visual thinkers, this means they think in pictures rather like a DVD running through their imagination, pictures being their first language, and words (spoken and written)  being their second language.

 

Therefore teaching children on the autism spectrum is made a whole deal easier if the teaching is done pictorially or visually.

 

Rather than string together long sentences or display written instruction try to use more visual prompts such as diagrams, pictures, graphs and images when teaching.

 

Avoid long strings of verbal instructions. People with autism have problems with remembering the sequence this a common symptom of autism.

 

Using visual supports like visual support cards, PECS and social stories are excellent visual supports for children on the autism spectrum. For example children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills; this is a common symptom of autism and is present in all children on the autism spectrum.

 

Having difficulties with social and communication skills is referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect three main areas of development: Social skills, Communication skills and Imagination skills.

 

Using social stories as an Intervention strategy parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals are able to combat difficulties with the individual’s autistic impairments.

 

For example many children with autism struggle with transitions, changes to routines, reading emotions and expressions, learning skills, behaviours, communication and imagination. A social skills story can target the difficulty and visually show a detailed plan for tackling the situation.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip visually representing the skill or situation being taught, like a role model or visual plan. The social story will break the skill down into easy to understand sections, removing un-necessary language and fluff.

 

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is a marked difficulty for most people with autism.

 

The social skills story uses visual images or pictures to explain the skill or situations and first person appropriate language always written from the autistic child’s point of view.

 

Most social stories are written in word format making them easy to edit and personalize, as none of us use the same terminology with our children and no two social story are ever going to be the same therefore social stories should be easy to edit.

 

Social stories should also be convenient to use, printable social stories for children with autism are available from reputable sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find printable social stories for children with autism on a wide variety of issues such as: hygiene, for school, at home and for occasions and activities like visiting the dentist, getting a haircut and transitions such as moving school and house as well as for everyday skills like making friends.

 

To find downloads of social stories for kids with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social Stories for Autistic Children

Thursday, December 23rd, 2010

Due to social skills deficits children with autism need special INTERVENTION STRATEGIES to learn social skills. Social Stories for Autistic Children and visual support cards are two effective autism teaching aids that can be used.

 

Children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills this is known as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

Having social skills deficits will affect how autistic children view themselves and those people around them. Typically autistic children tend to be involved in their own world and not interested in interacting with people around them.

 

It is because of the triad of autistic impairments and issues such as sensory processing issues which mean children with an ASD  require Intervention Strategies and autism teaching aids to help them function and cope.

 

Probably the most popular autism teaching aids are social stories for autistic children and visual support cards, both of which are excellent Intervention Strategies, ARE easy to implement and need no formal training to use.

 

Social Stories are short descriptive stories like a comic strip which use pictures or images to teach children with an ASD social, communication and imagination skills, and help overcome social skills deficits.

 

Social stories use visual images to describe a social situation in terms of the relevant social cues in a manner a child with autism can better understand. The images and first person text will show the child with autism verbal and non verbal cues.

 

A good social skills story will act as a visual plan or role model for the child with autism to follow. Social stories can be used for various situations and skills effectively such as: asking questions, being fair, calming down, eating new foods, making friends and so on. Social stories are also used in schools to help children with autism understand and cope with school, for example recess, assembly, P.E and so on.

 

A social skills story breaks the skill into smaller easier to understand sections and answers the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and gives an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is a known weakness in autism.

 

To learn more about social stories for autistic children and get downloads of appropriate social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

To learn more about other autism teaching aids such as visual support cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Other sites with autism teaching aids are: http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.org.uk

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) regardless of their age will have autistic behaviour issues, this is a fact.

 

The term Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term used to describe a set of conditions ranging from Asperger syndrome to low functioning autism. The common denominator in all children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is their social skills deficits or the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments – social skills deficits that are associated with ASD affect the autistic child in three main areas of development, each of which can have its own specific autistic behaviour difficulties.


The areas of development affected are:

Social Interactions,

Communication Difficulties,

And Imagination Skills Deficits

 

For children with autism the world can seem confusing, with situations we find normal can to an autistic child be stressful and can even cause anxiety or autistic behaviour difficulties. For example a surprise visit, a dental check up, birthday party, even a change in routine, TV programme change etc can all be anxiety triggers to a children with autism.

 

It is because of their social skills deficits a child on the spectrum can seem distant, distracted, have a poor attention span even appear aloof or rude. This can cause issues with peers etc and sometimes even lead to social isolation and at times bullying.

 

Treatments of autism that are aimed at addressing autistic behaviour issues can be implemented easily to help a child on the spectrum cope with and understand situations or skills that cause them stress or can be anxiety triggers to the child on the spectrum.

 

One of the major treatments of autism used is social skills stories. First developed to aid Communication Difficulties, social skills stories are now mainly used to teach children on the spectrum social, communication and imagination skills and address autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively using social skills stories has proven effective for many years. With their growing popularity social skills stories are now more widely available, sites offering expertly written social skills stories allow parents, caregivers and teachers that opportunity to download this valuable resource, sometimes for a small fee.

 

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the point of view of the autistic child, using visual images and first person text, the social story will follow a set pattern of sentence type to form a short visual plan, like a comic strip.

 

This short story will visually represent the skill or situation and act as a role model to the autistic child, helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Social skills stories can be printed an edited to make them more personal to the child on the spectrum and for ease of use and convenience. Sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer a wide variety of social skills stories on a variety of subjects. All of which can help parents struggling with managing autistic behaviour issues.


To learn more about how a social story will help your autistic child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills