Posts Tagged ‘autistic behaviour’

What causes autistic behaviour issues?

Monday, February 20th, 2012

To understand what causes autistic behaviour issues it is important to have an understanding of autism.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects how individuals with autism processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts, behaves and processes sensory input or stimuli. The main symptoms of autism ARE social skills deficits in social awareness skills, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is these social skills deficits that ARE the significant factor in what causes autistic behaviour issues. Typically children on the autism spectrum have communication difficulties and may lack the ability to ask or respond to things which their typically developing peers WILL treat as “normal”

For example recess a typically developing child WILL probably enjoy the freedom of recess but for children on the autism spectrum recess may be uncomfortable, stressful and confusing! This may lead to inappropriate behaviour around recess.

For a child with autism the sheer chaos of recess is upsetting, a child with autism WILL prefer sameness, order and routine and recess is none of these things. Children with autism have difficulties in understanding that not everyone shares their interest or feels that same way they do fully.

By taking a look into what causes autistic behaviour issues we can begin to unravel what it is that our own child with autism may be getting upset or confused by. Careful observation of a child with autism CAN help you to determine exactly what is troubling your child.

There are various supports for autism that WILL help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their social skills deficits. Probably one of the most significant of these supports for autism is social skills stories.

These ARE short descriptive pieces of text that describe a situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues. We know that the vast majority of individuals with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and language is used as secondary.

It is important therefore to USE supports for autism which ARE VISUAL like social stories. Social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties focus on a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with and breaks it down into small easy to understand sections using images/pictures and first person text.

The social skills story CAN act much like a visual plan or framework of the skill allowing the child on the spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill. So going back to our recess example earlier, introducing a social story for recess WILL HELP the child with autism prepare for and understand recess. The social skills story can be looked at each day before recess, helping the child with autism feel more comfortable once recess arrives.

The social skills story CAN BE USED for a wide variety of difficulties, such as self-help skills, communication deficits, hygiene skills, behaviours and many more, in-fact almost anything the child with autism is finding hard.

Typically social stories answer the ever important “wh” question – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and WILL offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues

Saturday, February 18th, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties that parents with an autistic child report is their child’s behaviour issues.

It is important to remember that unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum is far less likely to misbehave “just because” and that most if not ALL autistic behaviour WILL happen for a reason an internal or external factor.

Typically children with autism HAVE social skills deficits in three main areas of development: social awareness, communication – both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills, as well as sensory processing issues.

It is these social skills deficits and sensory processing issues which WILL contribute to the majority of behaviour issues in autism.

Managing autistic behaviour issues can BE ACHIEVED through the use of Intervention Strategies.

Intervention Strategies ARE put in place to help the autistic child manage their behaviours and find coping methods for skills and behaviours that they are struggling with.

Intervention Strategies like social skills stories and visual social story cards ARE probably the most significant of the Intervention Strategies for helping with managing autistic behaviour issues.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories written to help children with autism overcome social skills deficits. A social skills story CAN act like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation the autistic child is struggling with.

A social skills story WILL use appropriate first person text and be from the child’s won perspective. It should be written in word format to allow for editing and personalization as this is important for children with autism and we all use different terminology with our children.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties USE visual images/pictures to help show the child on the spectrum visually what is happening making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners this means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about managing autistic behaviour issues using Intervention Strategies like social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find downloads of approx. 100 social stories.

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Unlike typically developing children, a child on the spectrum WILL ONLY display inappropriate or odd behaviours for a reason an internal or external factor, NOT out of boredom, mischief or simply for the hell of it!

 

Generally individuals on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore, when considering techniques and strategies which can help combat autistic behaviour difficulties those techniques and methods should be VISUAL.

 

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories can have a profound effect for children on the spectrum helping overcome many of the difficulties they face daily.

 

Deficits in social, communication and imagination skills ARE a common weakness in autism, and the major reason for most autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

All individuals on the spectrum WILL certainly have deficits in social, communication and imagination skills. However the degree of deficits will depend on the autistic individual.

 

Commonly, Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties ARE implemented by parents, in schools, colleges and can be used to HELP a child on the spectrum UNDERSTAND AND COPE with a situation, event or skill that is causing them distress, confusion or fear.

 

Social Skills Stories WILL encourage positive behaviours, and reduce unwanted and negative situations and behaviours.

 

Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior  

 

A social story will act as a role model, like a visual framework detailing the key points of the skills or behaviour and showing visually what is happening.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of weakness for people with autism.

 

Generally people with autism have difficulties understanding that other people may not share their interests and may have different opinions. By using Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties YOU can help the individual with an ASD realise that people are all different with varying opinions and likes and dislikes.

 

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive pieces of first person text with visual images showing a skill in visual comic like fashion allowing the individual with an ASD to practise the skill or behaviour, helping them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

To learn more about popular Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior where you will find information on social skills stories as well as downloads of appropriate social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties

 

Other sites with social stories can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Communication difficulties in child with autism

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Common to individuals with autism are social skills deficits. Having social skills deficits can make communication difficult for a child with autism.

As typical beings we communicate both verbally and non-verbally daily. Communication is a major skill, we naturally learn. For individuals with autism however the ability to communicate is affected, having ASD can make an individual react and interact in a very different manner to typically developing beings.

For a child with an ASD expressing their needs or wants, can quite often be misunderstood. For example: In the classroom; A child with autism may not typically ask for a drink when they are thirsty, they may for example snatch the drink from another person, simply take the drink without asking or maybe they will shout out etc., this is typical to autism.

 

Normally all adverse autistic behaviour will happen for a reason an internal or external factor, not simply out of mischief or the desire to be awkward or naughty.

Research shows us autistic children are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching or caring for a child with autism it is usually best to use visual tools and supports when you are trying to get information across or tackle an adverse autistic behaviour. 

 

Research shows a child with autism will be less confused when the information presented to them is visual.

Understandably many teachers especially those teaching in mainstream education are little prepared to teach a child with autism. The English language is predominantly verbal, and this is the main focus in mainstream education. However with an autistic student this method of teaching is not always going to be affective.

With a poor attention span and communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication the autistic student may struggle with lessons which are primarily verbal or written.

A lack social skills and communication difficulties can make it problematic for autistic children to make and maintain friendships, and generally “fit in” socially.

Using visual support tools for autism such as social stories; WILL help to improve communication difficulties in a child with autism.

Using visual supports tools for autism within the classroom and at home can help the child with an ASD focus on the skill or situation that they are struggling with. A social skills story can show the child with an ASD a visual step by step plan or framework of what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) helping the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, the social story has now evolved into a significant tool used by parents and teachers to help them improve communication difficulties and social skills in their child with autism.

To find out more about social stories and how they help improve communication difficulties in a child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other sites offering social stories to improve social and communication skills for the autistic student can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Recent studies show that social stories can help reduce problem behaviours in children with autism. As well as increase social awareness and teach new skills.

In some cases the new behaviours were maintained even after the social skills story was faded out. Generally Social stories work best for children who have basic language skills.

Social Stories are visual strategies which can be implemented to help teach social skills to children with autism and related disabilities.

Autistic behaviour difficulties can be addressed using social stories, the social story will provide the ASD child with accurate information about a situation or skill that they may find difficult or confusing.

The situation or skill is described in detail using visual images and first person text giving focus to the key points: the important social cues.

By answering the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and emotions as well as reactions of those around them.

The main objective of the social skills story is to increase the understanding of the ASD child making him/her more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation in question.

Therefore social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties are beneficial in helping teach appropriate behaviours. To learn more about social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Where you will find important information on social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties, as well as social stories for various skills and situations your ASD child may be struggling to cope with or understand like for example: Making friends, asking questions, tooth brushing, shopping and so on…

These visual strategies are easy to download, edit and personalize and can be printed for convenience. All written in first person language and from the child’s own point of view, visual and in an easy to understand manner, these social skills stories can act as a role model in various situations.

Other sites offering info and downloads include http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) regardless of their age will have autistic behaviour issues, this is a fact.

 

The term Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term used to describe a set of conditions ranging from Asperger syndrome to low functioning autism. The common denominator in all children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is their social skills deficits or the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments – social skills deficits that are associated with ASD affect the autistic child in three main areas of development, each of which can have its own specific autistic behaviour difficulties.


The areas of development affected are:

Social Interactions,

Communication Difficulties,

And Imagination Skills Deficits

 

For children with autism the world can seem confusing, with situations we find normal can to an autistic child be stressful and can even cause anxiety or autistic behaviour difficulties. For example a surprise visit, a dental check up, birthday party, even a change in routine, TV programme change etc can all be anxiety triggers to a children with autism.

 

It is because of their social skills deficits a child on the spectrum can seem distant, distracted, have a poor attention span even appear aloof or rude. This can cause issues with peers etc and sometimes even lead to social isolation and at times bullying.

 

Treatments of autism that are aimed at addressing autistic behaviour issues can be implemented easily to help a child on the spectrum cope with and understand situations or skills that cause them stress or can be anxiety triggers to the child on the spectrum.

 

One of the major treatments of autism used is social skills stories. First developed to aid Communication Difficulties, social skills stories are now mainly used to teach children on the spectrum social, communication and imagination skills and address autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively using social skills stories has proven effective for many years. With their growing popularity social skills stories are now more widely available, sites offering expertly written social skills stories allow parents, caregivers and teachers that opportunity to download this valuable resource, sometimes for a small fee.

 

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the point of view of the autistic child, using visual images and first person text, the social story will follow a set pattern of sentence type to form a short visual plan, like a comic strip.

 

This short story will visually represent the skill or situation and act as a role model to the autistic child, helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Social skills stories can be printed an edited to make them more personal to the child on the spectrum and for ease of use and convenience. Sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer a wide variety of social skills stories on a variety of subjects. All of which can help parents struggling with managing autistic behaviour issues.


To learn more about how a social story will help your autistic child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

Strategies used for motivating students with autism

Tuesday, June 1st, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. The disorder is characterized by a set of symptoms known as the triad of impairments, these are:

 

Social interactions skills deficits

Communication skills deficits

Imagination skills deficits.

 

This triad of impairments or social skills deficits as they are more commonly referred to are common to all individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Therefore students with autism will almost certainly display social skills deficits.

The autistic student will have social skills impairments which can affect their ability to communicate with and understand others.

 

The autistic student will lack social interaction and flexibility skills, preferring set patterns and routines, this inability to be flexible can cause stress and anxiety if routines are changed even slightly.


These social skills deficits can make understanding communication and social skills in the classroom and around school difficult for the ASD student.


It is true to say that individuals with ASD cannot easily behave in a typical “more normal” way. An autistic student will not purposefully disrupt the class; all autistic behaviour happens for a reason an external or internal (illness) factor.


It is these external and internal factors that trigger a negative autistic behaviour through sheer frustration with situations and with other people.


Teaching the ASD student is difficult. Strategies can be put in place that can help deal with the affects of the student’s social skills deficits, which can help the motivation and behaviours displayed by the ASD student.

Strategies used for motivating students with autism can include visual schedules, PECS, flash cards, autism symbols and social skills stories.


For the majority of students with autism a combination of all these autism resources is favourable. However for many students with autism probably one of the most useful autism resources available is social skills stories.


Social stories as strategies used for motivating students with autism are short visual strategies used to show a skill or situation that the student is struggling with. Using visual images and first person text the social story is used like a role model of the skill or situation. Detailing the skill by giving the student with autism the relevant social cues, answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and giving an insight into the emotions, thoughts and nonverbal communication shown or felt by others.


Easy to implement, personalize and with no formal training needed to use social skills stories are used widely in the classroom for dealing with issues such as staying on task, calling out, asking question, recess, P.E. lessons and so on.

 

To learn more about autism resources and strategies for motivation students with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

OR

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Other autism resources such as autism symbols and flash cards are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

And social skills stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social stories that help with autistic behavior issues

Friday, March 5th, 2010

Social stories are a common strategy used when dealing with autistic behaviour issues, the social story can help the individual with ASD to ‘read’ and understand  a social situation, activity or skill.

 

Social stories were first developed by Carol Gray around twenty years ago to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with.

 

Social stories seek to include answers to the “wh” questions (who, what, when, where, and why) that the individual with ASD may need to know to allow them to master the situation, activity or skill they are struggling with, or may struggle with if the story is being used to help with a change to routine for example.

 

Social stories are used effectively for many situations, activities and skills not just how to interact and communicate in social settings. They can be used to learn new skills, to rehearse changes to routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger and frustration.

 

Social stories that help with autistic behavior issues can be downloaded from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior where you can find 65 autistic behaviour social stories ready for immediate download as well as information on what are social stories?


Social stories are short descriptive, visual frameworks that are written to help children with autism to understand a skill or behaviour that they would otherwise struggle with or find stressful or confusing.

 

Much like a comic strip conversation the social story is written in first person text and follows a specific formula, which enables the autistic individual to prepare for and rehearse. Generally all individuals with autism are visual thinkers and learners, making visual information easier to understand. Social stories embrace this concept as they are normally visually rich, with appropriate text.

 

Many parents, teachers and other professionals that work with autistic children use social stories that help with autistic behavior issues such as stimming, hygiene issues, sharing, teasing even recess.

 

To get started with social stories that help with autistic behaviours visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


For all other social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

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