Posts Tagged ‘Autism tools’

social stories teaching tools

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Social stories teaching tools are a resource used to teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum.

 

Social skills difficulties are a common characteristic of autism, and are generally treated with various autism tools.

 

Generally individuals on the autism spectrum are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore autism tools should be visual.

 

Social stories teaching tools are visual they were first developed by Carol Gray almost twenty years ago as a means of communicating with the autistic children she was working with.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that act like a role model for  autistic children. Using first person language and images the social skills story answers the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving possible reactions and solutions the autistic child may consider, helping to make them more comfortable with and in the situation they may be struggling with.

The social skills story will show the autistic child how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view. It will also explain rules, routines, situations, upcoming events or abstract concepts; and how the child with autism can understand expectations.

Social stories teaching tools are visual strategies which can teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum, are easy to implement can be edited and personalized as well as printed for convenience.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com for more information on social skills stories and other autism tools used as visual strategies to teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum.

Or  http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Visual schedules for autism

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010


Using autism tools such as visual schedules for autism is beneficial. A visual schedule is a set of pictures or images that show visually, like a step by step plan a series of activities or the specific steps of an activity. The visual schedule does this by showing the child on the spectrum what activities will occur and in what sequence.

 

To make a visual schedule you will need a set of pictures or images that can be used and a piece of laminated card or board that the images or pictures can be attached to. Appropriate pictures or images can be acquired from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Much like a social skills story, visual schedules for autism provide the child on the spectrum with positive cues allowing them to predict what is happening and what is about to happen which removes anxieties.


Using appropriate images or pictures a visual schedule gives the child with autism a step by step framework for the day. Children with autism do not like surprises and rigidly stick to routines. Visual schedules are excellent autism tools, for removing anxieties and setting routine and structure to the day.


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners and will respond well to visual information. Another excellent resource recommended for use with children with autism and visual schedules is the social skills story.

 

For example many children with autism struggle with even simple tasks like asking questions, class discussions, using the toilet, hygiene, recess and so on. Anxieties can still occur even if you are using visual schedules for autism. If the child with autism is unsure how to perform a task or activity on the schedule they may become confused and anxious, this is where a social skills story will help.

 

Again visually rich a social skills story can show using a specific style and formula how the child on the spectrum should act and why. By using visual images a social skills story sets out the task, skill or activity by breaking it down into small understandable steps; the visual cues allowing the child with autism to understand the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what removing stress and confusion.

 

For many children with autism communication can be tricky, this is common to autism, social skills stories predict the reaction and suggest possible responses the child with autism may consider making.


For example: many children with autism have difficulties with activities such as visiting the dentist. Parents suggest in recent surveys using social skills stories allows their child to rehears the visit by reading through the story. Therefore once at the dentist the child with autism is not stressed they will understand what is happening and what is expected of them, they will also understand why the dentist will want to look into their mouth and what they should do, for example sitting in the chair, the lights will be bright etc.

 

Now the child is prepared using visual schedules for autism your child can see a dental visit is happening and by reading the social story your child will not be anxious about this upcoming event.


By giving your child with autism and visual schedules and social skills stories you’re using autism tools that are specifically designed to help individuals on the spectrum cope with daily activities and changes to routines successfully.

 

All individuals on the spectrum will benefit for autism tools such as visual schedules and social skills stories.

 

To download social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


To accquire images and pictures that can be used on any visual schedules or as flash or PECS cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction

Monday, May 24th, 2010

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a neurological condition affecting an individuals social and communication development. ASD is characterized by the individual’s social impairments and ritualistic, obsessive behaviours.

 

A major issue in children with autism spectrum disorder is their communication difficulties, both verbal and nonverbal, these are common to ASD, and will affect how the ASD child interacts socially.


For an ASD child having communication difficulties can be stressful, often likened to being dropped in a foreign land with no conception of the language or customs.

 

Communication difficulties are common to ASD the child will have difficulties understanding verbal instruction and information, sarcasm, humour, wit and emotion etc. this lack of communication skill can often be misunderstood and may lead people to believe the child with ASD is rude or aloof.

 

The child with ASD may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.


Many children with autism spectrum disorder will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, will show little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

Autistic individual’s social impairments can impact on how the child with autism will interact with others. Consequently, Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction are based on the individuals strengths, which in most cases is visual.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in children with autism spectrum disorder, making it necessary to teach social skills and social and communication skills directly.

 

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means visual information and instruction is far easier for them to understand. This concept is used in social stories which teach social skills and deal with communication difficulties.

 

Using visual supports like social skills stories for autism make autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions much easier. Parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, and imagination and interaction skills such as asking question, making friends, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space and so on.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are today one of the major autism tools used to help children with autism overcome social interaction and communication difficulties.


To find appropriate autism tools such as autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions social skills stories on topics like making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

 

Motivating students with autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Motivating students with autism spectrum disorder can be challenging. With many teachers finding them selves struggling to keep their autistic students on task and focused, unless the particular lesson being taught is of interest to them.

 

Teachers also report communication difficulties, as well as difficulties with social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours can be an issue. These difficulties are common with autism and are due to social skills deficits, which are always present in autism spectrum disorder.

 

It is due to social skills deficits that many teachers struggle motivating students with autism spectrum disorder. However there are autism tools available which can be implemented to help teachers overcome the social skills deficits displayed by autistic students.

 

One of the major autism tools used with great effect are visual strategies such as visual timetables, visual support cards and social skills stories all of which can be implemented easily and used for autistic students.

 

Motivating students with autism using visual strategies is proven effective, generally students with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners meaning they respond and understand information when it is presented visually rather than by text or auditory.

 

Students with autism spectrum disorder will not like routine changes and can become stressed and anxious quickly, by using social skills stories this can be addressed effectively.

 

Social skills stories are also used to address social skills deficits and teach positive behaviours. A social skills story for students with autism will help the student understand and feel more comfortable with situations or skills they struggle with like for example staying on task, asking questions, following rules, recess and so on.


Normally written by experts, social skills stories follow a set formula, always use first person language and visual images, much like a comic strip conversation. Helping the autistic student to feel more comfortable with and in the situation by answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving the autistic student an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.


For more information on social skills stories that can be used to help with motivating students with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Other social skills stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Prognosis for autism

Tuesday, May 4th, 2010


It would not be fair to assume how an individual child will develop and grow.  It is a fact that all children will grow irrespective of their personal circumstance or educational ability.

 

Therefore the prognosis for autism remains the same, research suggests around 1 in every 300 children will receive a diagnosis of autism with approximately 30% of these children that receive a diagnosis of autism will be classified as high functioning or asperger children.

 

No matter what the prognosis of autism is diagnosed for your child all children with autism will display social skills deficits, the severity will depend largely on the individual child.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder have a normal life expectancy and in a lot of cases will lead a relatively normal life, once their social skills deficits are addressed sufficiently.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a life long condition and a diagnosis of autism will not be cured or outgrown.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder a lack of social skills can be challenging and cause great anxieties, especially for those children opting for mainstream education. A typically developing child may not truly understand autism and what the condition is all about; therefore this can lead to bullying in some cases.

 

It is a good idea if you are opting to place your autistic child in mainstream education that you make certain the appropriate autism classroom accommodations are set up and that teachers and pupils understand autism and what the condition is all about, this will reduce anxieties and stress for not only the teacher, you and your child.

 

Teachers can use autism classroom accommodations such as visual support cards, visual schedules for autism, social stories and other autism treatments to ensure a positive learning environment for the autistic student.

 

The prognosis of autism in the classroom is very good with high functioning autistic students generally having average or above average intelligence. However it is fair to say that the concentration span of the autistic student may be somewhat shorter that a typically developing student.

 

There are methods that teachers can introduce that will help the autistic student concentrate better and understand school rules. Probably the most significant autism tools for this are social skills stories for students with autism. These are designed to help the student with autism understand what is expected of them in school and lessons as well as what they may expect from the teacher and other pupils.

 

Normally social skills stories for students with autism are written by experts and will follow a pre-set formula which was first used almost twenty years ago. Since then social skills stories have become one of the most significant autism tools available and are used with great effect in the classroom and home of the autistic child.

 

A social story is a short visual script much like a comic strip, that details a skill, situation or behaviour that the autistic child is struggling with for example, recess or assembly the social story will break the situation down into understandable chunks and use appropriate first person text and visual images to explain and answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism grasp what is happening, what is expected of them, suggest possible outcomes and allow the child to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Sites that offer social skills stories for students with autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Alternatively other sites offering social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.org.uk

http://www.autismsocialskillsstories.org.uk

http://www.autismsocialstories.co.uk