Posts Tagged ‘autism spectrum disorders’

Comprehending autism spectrum disorders

Tuesday, January 12th, 2016

Parents, teachers, caregivers and other professionals involved in the care and well being of an individual on the spectrum can find comprehending autism spectrum disorders confusing and stressful.

 

All children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will have the triad of autistic impairments in their ability to:

 

Socially interact

Communication difficulties

Imagination skills

 

Plus in most cases sensory processing issues which can affect an autistic individuals senses (taste, smell, touch, sound and sight). Most children with an ASD will also display obsessive and repetitive behaviours, will prefer routines and can become anxious if these routines change.

 

Children with an ASD also display marked difficulties with non-verbal and verbal communication. A child with autism will have difficulties comprehending the communication and language used by those around them as well difficulties in developing effective communication themselves.

 

Unlike typically developing children that learn social skills naturally, a child with autism will struggle socially. For many parents probably the hardest challenge they face is their child’s difficulty to understand the social behaviour of others. A child with autism will have difficulties displaying and comprehending appropriate socially accepted behaviours.

 

Generally most autistic individuals do not process information in the same manner as typically developing beings.  The opinions and thoughts of other are of no real consequence for the individual on the spectrum, which can cause frustrations and upset.

 

Consequently, comprehending autism spectrum disorders can be frustrating and stressful for those involved in the everyday care of an individual on the spectrum.

 

Research shows us however that although there is no cure for autism there are various treatments of autism that are available that can help overcome triad of autistic impairments.

 

Various treatments of autism like social skills stories work effectively addressing the triad of autistic impairments. They do this by showing the autistic child what to expect in certain situations or what is expected of them which reduces stress and helps control anxieties.

 

By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others a social skills stories visually explain using images and relevant social cues the skill or situation. All helping an autistic child to better understand and cope with the skill or situation that

They may be struggling with.   

 

To find a greater comprehending of autism spectrum disorders and how social skills stories can help address some of the issues faced by children with an ASD visit sites like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

books for autism spectrum disorders

Wednesday, February 2nd, 2011

The autism E-Store is the place to find materials for autism spectrum disorders

Material for autism spectrum disorders such as:

BOOKS

DVD’s

Educational Resources

Safety Equiptment

Toys

Games

There are tons of autism resources on offer, books for autism spectrum disorder can help parents and families coping with autism.

Plus lots more:

Visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/E-Store.html

Understanding autism spectrum disorders

Sunday, August 22nd, 2010

Parents, teachers, caregivers and other professionals involved in the care and well being of an individual on the spectrum can find understanding autism spectrum disorders confusing and stressful.


All children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will have the triad of autistic impairments in their ability to:


Socially interact

Communication difficulties

Imagination skills


Plus in most cases sensory processing issues which can affect an autistic individuals senses (taste, smell, touch, sound and sight). Most children with an ASD will also display obsessive and repetitive behaviours, will prefer routines and can become anxious if these routines change.


Children with an ASD also display marked difficulties with non-verbal and verbal communication. A child with autism will have difficulties understanding the communication and language used by those around them as well difficulties in developing effective communication themselves.


Unlike typically developing children that learn social skills naturally, a child with autism will struggle socially. For many parents probably the hardest challenge they face is their child’s difficulty to understand the social behaviour of others. A child with autism will have difficulties displaying and understanding appropriate socially accepted behaviours.

 

Generally most autistic individuals do not process information in the same manner as typically developing beings.  The opinions and thoughts of other are of no real consequence for the individual on the spectrum, which can cause frustrations and upset.

Consequently, understanding autism spectrum disorders can be frustrating and stressful for those involved in the everyday care of an individual on the spectrum.


Research shows us however that although there is no cure for autism there are various treatments of autism that are available that can help overcome triad of autistic impairments.

 

Various treatments of autism like social skills stories work effectively addressing the triad of autistic impairments. They do this by showing the autistic child what to expect in certain situations or what is expected of them which reduces stress and helps control anxieties.


By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others a social skills stories visually explain using images and relevant social cues the skill or situation. All helping an autistic child to better understand and cope with the skill or situation that

They may be struggling with. 


To find a greater understanding of autism spectrum disorders and how social skills stories can help address some of the issues faced by children with an ASD visit sites like:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

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In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


Asperger syndrome characteristics

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2009

As with autism those with asperger syndrome will have the triad of characteristics typical of autism spectrum disorders.

 

Triad of autism spectrum disorder characteristics:

Social deficits

Communication deficits

Imagination and interaction deficits

 

Whilst aspergers does share similarities with autism, the main difference is the aspergers individual will present fewer problems with speaking.

 

People with asperger syndrome characteristics will generally be of average or above average intelligence.

 

Another main difference is the asperger individual is less likely to present the associated learning difficulties autistic people have. However asperger syndrome characteristics do show the asperger individual may display other more specific learning disabilities like dyspraxia, dyslexia, ADHD and epilepsy.

 

There is no reason why people with aspergers can not live a normal life.

 

Aspergers syndrome Characteristics

 

People with asperger syndrome are as earlier discussed on the autism spectrum disorder scale. The symptoms of asperger syndrome will vary between individuals.

 

Generally the common thread connecting asperger syndrome individuals is there deficits in communication and language.

 

People with aspergers present communication deficits and find conversation difficult. There lack of social language skills can hinder them socially, leaving them open to ridicule and bullying.

 

For example:

They lack the ability to read body language and facial expressions. The asperger individual may misuse language, fail to understand puns, jokes, sarcasm and swear words. They will speak very literally which can cause social problems. For example if you ask a question expect a straight forward honest answer back.

 

An asperger individual may miss important social cues, and find relationships hard to maintain.

 

A classic symptom of aspergers syndrome is social deficits. Using inappropriate actions and language can lead to possible social isolation.

 

Asperger characteristics also include difficulties with imagination and can lead to very strict regimes and routines. Which could cause stress and anxiety’s in the asperger individual should there ever be a need to alter those routines.

 

Although some people with aspergers may show a real flare for certain activities, like painting, music even numeracy. They will also lack imagination.

 

The asperger person as with autistic individuals will like order and routine, even down to lining up their belongings, in a ritualistic fashion.

 

As with autism asperger individuals will need help with personal and social aspects of their life.

 

This is where resources and tools such as aspergers social skills stories become beneficial:

 

Research into aspergers syndrome characteristics shows that people with aspergers have found benefit and coping strategies to help them control, learn and manage awkward and everyday situations or issues they may well be finding difficult, stressful or confusing.

 

For example “A social Kiss”, “Appropriate Touching” the use of “Swear Words” even personal care issues such as “Using deodorant”, “Showering” and other topics like “Playing Basketball”.

 

In-fact asperger social skills stories can cover all aspects the asperger individual maybe needing help with.

Immediate download of asperger social skills stories for adolescents:

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

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Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Tips on working with aspergers

Monday, February 2nd, 2009

Aspergers syndrome is one of the autism spectrum disorders, affecting the brain of the individual.


That said aspergers individuals are not mentally retarded and will often have an average or above average IQ.

 

Many aspergers students will also display behaviors such as tics, obsessive-compulsiveness and sometimes ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder).

 

Here are some Tips on working with aspergers

 

Probably the first and most important tip on working with aspergers, would be to first get clear information on aspergers syndrome, and it’s affects on an individual

 

The asperger student:

 

Students with aspergers can bring both positive and negatives to a classroom. Their need for routine and sameness can be probably one the biggest challenges for an asperger educator.

 

The asperger educator should try and keep things as much as possible to a set routine, and when things need to alter try and prepare the student with asperger for the change..by giving plenty of warnings.

 

An asperger educator should try and implement a visual schedule into the classroom for the asperger student to refer to, with lessons etc clearly shown as well as breaks, recess and home time.

 

Generally students with aspergers will not handle transitions easily. An asperger educator should try and make this transition as easy as possible by following a few simple rules:

 

 

Remember that asperger students can easily become overwhelmed in situations. Therefore keep all verbal directions short and precise. The more you talk at the asperger student the more stressed they will become, it will be difficult but talk less and try and use short two or three word sentences accompanied by visual cues.

 

It is also important to remember that aspergers students will interpret what you say literally, they do not respond to jokes or puns and will not understand slang or facial expressions.

 

They also find interpreting the tone of your voice difficult, avoid using puns for example “Wait there a minute”, this may become confusing and the student with aspergers will take this command literally.

 

Sarcasm also is something to try and avoid it will be misinterpreted by the aspergers student.

 

Asperger educators should also try and remember it is no good giving the asperger student a “You should not of done that look”, they will not understand as a normally developing student would.

 

Tell the asperger student exactly what it was they did wrong, be precise do not try and make funny remarks etc they will be misunderstood and taken literally.

 

Also remember while teaching the entire class the asperger student may not be understanding the teaching is also directed at them. So it would be a good idea to check at intervals that the asperger student is still listening to the lesson.

 

A good set of tips on working with aspergers to remember will also be, during lessons with multi tasks to perform use visual cues and asperger social skills stories…for the asperger student to re-enforce they have understood what you are saying.

 

Also use asperger social skills stories to re-enforce your teaching and to help keep the asperger student on task.


Asperger social skills stories can be easily implemented into the asperger students school day and used to effectively help the asperger student remember how to behave in the classroom and at all other times of the day. They are also good for teaching new skills like “having a good conversation”, “being a good sport” etc.

 

Plus as a coping strategy for personal care, they can be used to explain puberty, swear words, and having good manners.

 

Asperger social skills stories are written in the first person and are pictorially rich.

 

Finally as an asperger educator you should also remember that one of the deficits with aspergers and indeed all form of autism spectrum disorder is the individual’s difficulties with social interaction and this will include a lack of eye contact.

 

Do not demand the asperger student look at you while you are talking. This is very hard for them and can cause extreme stress and anxiety.

 

For immediate downloads of asperger social skills stories that can be used with positive effects for all asperger students visit:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

 

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet