Foster social skills in kids with autism

Typically kids with autism HAVE deficits in three main areas of development: social, communication (both verbal and non-verbal) and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is because of these deficits many kids with autism HAVE difficulties understanding and accepting the “hidden social rules of everyday life”.

For example a child on the spectrum WILL commonly miss social cues and be unable to interpret body language or facial expression – so it is of no use “tutting” or giving “knowing nod” these hidden social cues WILL usually be missed!

However there are treatments for autism which foster social skills in kids with autism such as social skills stories and picture communication cards.

These treatments for autism ARE normally USED to help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they normally struggle with like for example asking questions, sharing, making friends and so on…

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text written in a set format which is typically first person text and from the autistic child’s own point of view.

Characteristically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they find visual information easier to understand and follow, therefore it is believed and proven through research that children with autism respond better to visual teaching.

Consequently, social skills stories and picture communication cards DO FOLLOW this belief and ARE typically visual.

The social skills story USES images and pictures with short pieces of text to visually show the child on the spectrum what is happening and why.

The social skills story does this by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

The social skills story can be adapted to suit individual needs and abilities and are generally written in word format with NO FORMAL training needed to use social skills stories.

Teachers and parents can foster social skills in kids with autism using social stories and picture communication cards. To gain immediate download and learn more about how these treatments for autism work visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com 

OR

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

Using social stories for autism

As typically developing beings we naturally learn social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. This ability is missing in autism spectrum disorder and often referred to as the theory of mind or social skills deficits.

 

Probably the major factor for many parents raising an autistic child is their child’s social skills deficits. This is also true in the classroom with many teachers being insufficiently trained in teaching students with autism.

 

Teaching social and communication skills can often become a primary concern for many teachers and parents.

 

Success in addressing social skills deficits by teaching social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours can increase self-confidence and lead to positive results at home and in the classroom for students with autism.


Using social stories for autism is a VERY BENEFICIAL strategy which is used by the vast majority of parents raising an autistic child, care givers and teachers.


The most important aspect of a social skills story is that it provides the child on the autism spectrum with a role model.

The vast majority of children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore strategies which suit children with autism spectrum best ARE visual like social stories.


Social stories can be used for more than learning social, imagination and communication skills, they can be used FOR TRANSITIONS, new routines, changes in routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger.

 

Using social stories for autism will help the child on the spectrum to better understand the thoughts, feelings and views of other people.


By implementing social stories for autism the child on the spectrum is more able to predict another person’s behaviour based on their actions.


Social stories present various situations and skills in a structured and clear manner in a way children with autism spectrum will find easier to understand. The social skills story should be written from the child’s perspective and follow a set formula of four sentence type: descriptive, perspective, direction and control.

Using social stories for autism will answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what, helping reduce confusion and anxieties, making unpredictable situations more routine.

 

By using visual images and first person text the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which children with autism spectrum find easy to use.


Editable, and printable the social skills story will suit all ages and abilities, parents can personalize the social skills story using their child’s name and language that is familiar to them. No two children with autism are ever the same and normally some tweaking of social stories is needed.


To learn more about how using social stories for autism can benefit your child or student with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social stories have been used a s a strategy with autistic children for around twenty years giving positive results.

Other social stories for autistic children and teenagers can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Grandparenting an autistic child

It is believed that every 1 in 166 grandparents will become the grandparent to an autistic child.

 

The diagnosis of autism can be stressful enough for any family and can sometimes lead to conflict between parents and grandparents.

 

Grandparenting an autistic child is stressful and confusing; both mentally, physically and on occasions financially.


There are many things grandparents can do to help their autistic grandchild overcome their challenges and get the most of life. From learning all you can about autism spectrum disorder and what the diagnosis of autism will mean to the entire family to helping support your autistic grandchild lean social skills.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition and is not curable; autism spectrum disorder affects more males then females.


Often the diagnosis of autism can have a huge impact on the entire family and cause marital issues between the autistic child’s parents. This is where a grandparent can be of support and help, easing tensions and generally helping out around the home and with the families other children can help.

 

There will be tough times ahead and being prepared by reading books, magazines, reports and articles on autism can provide answers questions that you may be struggling to comprehend.

 

A good source of autism resources can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 


Where you can find autism tools and other autism resources that will help you understand and cope with grandparenting an autistic child.


Good luck!

 

 

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Autism Causes – Genetics, Environmental, Virus, Pesticides? Let’s Explore

The causes of autism are not yet known with certainty. Recent research suggests a link between genetic susceptibility and environmental agents. Indeed, there is evidence that no one factor causes autism and that perhaps there exists a synergy among several agents. This view is based upon the range of symptoms of autism and severity among those who are diagnosed as autistic.

 

There has been an apparent rise in the occurrence of autism since about 1980, but the root causes of autism have not been found. There is speculation that better diagnostic techniques have uncovered symptoms of autism and cases that would otherwise have gone unrecognized.

 

Research indicates tentatively that 90% of the autism cases have a genetic link. A specific gene of interest is the Engrailed 2 (EN2) gene, which may account for 40% of autism cases. It is significant in normal neural development. If the gene’s expression is disrupted in some way, it is believed that EN2 could impact significantly on normal brain development. However, autism may be causes by the interaction and malfunction of more than one gene. The research is on-going.

 

Additionally, in a study conducted in 2007, three common factors were found to be of interest in some cases of autism: older maternal age, older paternal age, and birthplace of the mother outside Europe or North America. The higher parental age may suggest an issue with genetic material integrity.


Alternatively, some rare cases of autism appear to be related to environmental factors. In the past several years, there has been a great deal of controversy over the incidence of autism with relation to childhood immunizations. To-date, there is no strong statistical correlation to support this proposal.


The prenatal environment has come into focus as a possible origin, especially events taking place within the first eight weeks of gestation of the fetus. Although most infectious diseases appear not to be significant contributors to the causes of autism, the rubella virus may be a suspect. Exposure to pesticides may have some effect, but the research is inconclusive.

 

Maternal folic acid levels may have some bearing, as folic acid is directly involved in neural tube development in the fetus and has a direct effect on gene expression. Perhaps the most promising research finding recently has been the association of maternal infection early in pregnancy with the child’s later autism.


The cause of autism is most likely over determined, meaning that more than one factor is involved. Given the range of symptoms of autism and severity of autism, this could well be so.

 

There are many more resources and information about autism signs, symptoms, treatments, and cutting edge medical research in, Autism: Everything Parents And Caregivers Should Know About The Disorder- http://autismsymptoms1.com/go.php?offer=simon8775&pid=1

Alternatively visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

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What is safe and what is not!

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What are the symptoms of Aspergers syndrome?

Aspergers is a mild form of Autism, as with Autism it is a lifelong disability.

Aspergers syndrome, affects people in a similar way to Autism, the person has difficulties with three main areas of development:

  • The persons social imagination
  • Their communication skills
  • Plus their social interaction abilities

While there are similarities to Autism, the main difference is that the Aspergers person will have fewer problems with speaking. Plus they will normally have average, or above average intelligence.

Another difference is that they tend not have the associated learning difficulties Autistic people have. But might have other more specific learning disabilities like dyspraxia, dyslexia, ADHD and epilepsy.

There is no reason why an aspergers person can not live a normal life.

Characteristics Aspergers Syndrome

As with most conditions the characteristics of asperger syndrome will vary from person to person.

But there is always a common thread running through  all aspergers people.

  • Difficulties with communication and language

Generally aspergers people will find it hard to keep up with a conversation and will not express themselves correctly.

For example:

They may not understand how to begin a conversation, or end it and will not be able to read body language or facial expressions.

They may use odd language within a conversation and not understand jokes and other flippant remarks or phrases.

They will talk literally, stating the obvious even when it’s probably not cool to do so.

  • Difficulty with social interactions

An asperger person may miss important social cues, and find relationships hard to maintain.

For example: aspergers people may find it difficult making friends and will sometimes find it even harder to maintain those friendships they do strike up.

Aspergers people may not understand how to behave socially, they may begin inappropriate conversations and not respect personal space

The asperger person may appear withdrawn and uninterested in other people.

  • Have difficulties with imagination

Although some people with aspergers may show a real flare for certain activities, like painting, music or even things like numbers.

Generally people with aspergers lack social imagination.

As with Autism they will prefer repetition and sameness.

Also people with aspergers prefer routine, even down to lining up their belongings. in a ritualistic fashion.

For more information on aspergers and how to manage behaviors and problems using asperger social skills stories. Plus get all the latest information and research into how aspergers social skills stories can be used effectively for all people with aspergers helping them become more independant visit any of the blow sites and download these valuable asperger resources: www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills