Archive for April, 2012

Building autistic social skills

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Autism is a developmental disorder which has no known cure. That said THERE ARE plenty of excellent resources which can be used to help those diagnosed autistic.

Characteristically those diagnosed autistic WILL have social and communication difficulties, this is due to social skills deficits which ARE apparent in all people with autism but to varying degrees.

Typically people with autism WILL prefer visual information and teaching, it is therefore believed that resources and teaching styles should be more visual.

This is easily achieved through the use of visual resources for autism such as social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Using visual resources for autism is beneficial, and typically will need no formal training to implement and use.

For example social skills stories ARE visual resources for autism which ARE used specifically for building autistic social skills and helping to overcome communication and social awareness difficulties.

Having social skills deficits can be challenging for many children on the autism spectrum and can at times even lead to extreme behaviours, even bullying.

So how does the social story work?

The social skills story is a short visual story much like a comic script which is used as a visual framework or step by step detailed plan of the skill or situation that the child on the autism spectrum is finding hard.

Many children on the autism spectrum struggle with the chaos of recess, by implementing a social skills story the child will have a concrete plan of recess. This plan WILL explain what is happening and why, which WILL help the child on the autism spectrum cope and feel more comfortable.

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the child’s own point of view and use first person text. The social skills story describes the situation using images and short descriptive sentences or words.

The social story should answer the “wh” questions:-who, what, why, when and where. The social skills story should also answer “how” and provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children on the autism spectrum.

To view and learn more about visual resources for autism like social skills stories for building autistic social skills and to access immediate downloads visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories can help children with autism learn social skills

Thursday, April 12th, 2012

Social stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text that use images to help show the child with ASD how to develop social understanding and interact with others which is difficult for most autistics.

Social stories are written to help children with autism learn social skills and behaviours which they struggle with like for example – making friends, asking questions, sharing and so on…

Following set patterns of sentence types the social story is typically written in first person text and always from the perspective of the child with ASD.

The social story should aim to answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also aim to offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistics.

 Social stories can help children with autism learn social skills by giving them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour.

Characteristically kids with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they tend to think and learn visually rather than through written or spoken means. It is therefore important when trying to teach or impart information to kids with ASD you should make it visual, social stories follow this idea.

Using images to describe much like a visual plan or step by step plan the visual social story is easy to implement and will need no formal training to use.

To download social stories which can help children with autism learn social skills visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool