Archive for February, 2012

Autistic Supports

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Autistic supports ARE used to help people with autism learn or remember social and communication skills and behaviours.

There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant of the autistic supports ARE VISUAL.

Typically people with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they USE visual images/pictures as their first language and speech/ words as secondary.

Therefore it is commonly believed that the most BENEFICIAL autistic supports ARE VISUAL. For example:

Social stories

Visual social story cards and folders

PECS

Communication cards – flash cards

…And so on…

For the purpose of this article we are looking at SOCIAL STORIES

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports which were first introduced around twenty years ago to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.

Today social stories for autism ARE widely used by teachers and parents to not only teach but re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

A social story is a short descriptive story which looks much like a comic script. The social story WILL describe a skill or situation from the perspective of the child with autism.

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports that use images/pictures to detail what is happening and why. Acting like a visual framework or plan the social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most kids with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate downloads of 100 social stories for kids with autism

Autistic social skills

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties for children with autism spectrum is a lack of social awareness skills and behaviours, which is referred to as social skills deficits

These deficits ARE made worse due to deficits with communication both verbal and non-verbal. However there are various treatments of autism that CAN help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their own social skills deficits.

Typically developing children WILL learn social awareness skills through observation, peers, family and their environment. This is NOT TRUE for a child on the spectrum this is due to the “theory of mind” a child with autism WILL NOT be able to read another person’s facial expression or body language.

This lack of the theory of mind WILL mean that the child with autism WILL have difficulties determining what is happening the” hidden social rules” which CAN lead to social mistakes and at times even isolation.

There is no cure for autism but the various treatments of autism CAN and WILL help OVERCOME many of the skills your child is struggling with.

Probably one of the most significant treatments of autism is autistic social skills stories which ARE used to help children with autism spectrum understand and learn skills and behaviours that ARE causing them stress or confusion, like for example self-help skills, asking questions, making friends and so on…

Typically autistic social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text that ARE written in first person text and ALWAYS from the autistic individual’s point of view.

Commonly children with autism spectrum ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they find VISUAL information much easier to use and UNDERSTAND.

Autistic social skills stories ARE VISUAL, the social story USES images /pictures to detail the skill or behaviour in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story acts like a VISUAL FRAMEWORK OR PLAN of the skill or situation helping to make the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

It should also answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and should offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

To learn more about autistic social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Using visual supports for autism

Monday, February 20th, 2012

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and that speech/language is secondary.

It is therefore believed that for children with autism information and teaching that is VISUAL WILL be far easier for them to understand.

 Using visual supports for autism is therefore beneficial. There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant ARE social stories, PECS, communication picture cards, visual timetables and so on…

Using visual supports for autism WILL help you to teach social skills and address communication difficulties as well as helping to OVERCOME many of the difficulties the child with autism is struggling with.

Social skills stories ARE an important visual intervention strategy which was first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help OVERCOME communication difficulties for children with autism.

Since then the social story has developed and is now probably the most significant support for autism. The social skills story WILL help address the child’s social skills deficits.

All children with autism HAVE social skills deficits these ARE common to autism, but will vary between individuals. Social skills deficits affect how the child with autism processes information, acts, re-acts, behaves and thinks as well processes sensory stimuli and sensation.

The social skills story is a short descriptive piece of text that can act like a visual plan or framework of the skill detailing visually what is happening and what the child with autism CAN expect.

A social skills story WILL always be written from the child’s own perspective and WILL normally always be written in first person text. The social skills story should break the skill into smaller sections much like a comic script and answer the “wh” questions  - who, what, where, why and when as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Typically social stories are written in word format which WILL make them easier to personalize and edit, no two children are ever going to be the same and we all USE different terminology with our kids, therefore the need for editing is important.

For kids with ASD social awareness skills ARE difficult to master but by using visual supports for autism this can be addressed quite simply, which CAN help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they would once struggle with.

To learn more about how kids with ASD can cope with social awareness skills using supports for autism such as social stories and communication picture cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocalstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

What causes autistic behaviour issues?

Monday, February 20th, 2012

To understand what causes autistic behaviour issues it is important to have an understanding of autism.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects how individuals with autism processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts, behaves and processes sensory input or stimuli. The main symptoms of autism ARE social skills deficits in social awareness skills, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is these social skills deficits that ARE the significant factor in what causes autistic behaviour issues. Typically children on the autism spectrum have communication difficulties and may lack the ability to ask or respond to things which their typically developing peers WILL treat as “normal”

For example recess a typically developing child WILL probably enjoy the freedom of recess but for children on the autism spectrum recess may be uncomfortable, stressful and confusing! This may lead to inappropriate behaviour around recess.

For a child with autism the sheer chaos of recess is upsetting, a child with autism WILL prefer sameness, order and routine and recess is none of these things. Children with autism have difficulties in understanding that not everyone shares their interest or feels that same way they do fully.

By taking a look into what causes autistic behaviour issues we can begin to unravel what it is that our own child with autism may be getting upset or confused by. Careful observation of a child with autism CAN help you to determine exactly what is troubling your child.

There are various supports for autism that WILL help a child on the spectrum OVERCOME many of their social skills deficits. Probably one of the most significant of these supports for autism is social skills stories.

These ARE short descriptive pieces of text that describe a situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues. We know that the vast majority of individuals with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and language is used as secondary.

It is important therefore to USE supports for autism which ARE VISUAL like social stories. Social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties focus on a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with and breaks it down into small easy to understand sections using images/pictures and first person text.

The social skills story CAN act much like a visual plan or framework of the skill allowing the child on the spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill. So going back to our recess example earlier, introducing a social story for recess WILL HELP the child with autism prepare for and understand recess. The social skills story can be looked at each day before recess, helping the child with autism feel more comfortable once recess arrives.

The social skills story CAN BE USED for a wide variety of difficulties, such as self-help skills, communication deficits, hygiene skills, behaviours and many more, in-fact almost anything the child with autism is finding hard.

Typically social stories answer the ever important “wh” question – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and WILL offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues

Saturday, February 18th, 2012

Probably one of the most significant difficulties that parents with an autistic child report is their child’s behaviour issues.

It is important to remember that unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum is far less likely to misbehave “just because” and that most if not ALL autistic behaviour WILL happen for a reason an internal or external factor.

Typically children with autism HAVE social skills deficits in three main areas of development: social awareness, communication – both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills, as well as sensory processing issues.

It is these social skills deficits and sensory processing issues which WILL contribute to the majority of behaviour issues in autism.

Managing autistic behaviour issues can BE ACHIEVED through the use of Intervention Strategies.

Intervention Strategies ARE put in place to help the autistic child manage their behaviours and find coping methods for skills and behaviours that they are struggling with.

Intervention Strategies like social skills stories and visual social story cards ARE probably the most significant of the Intervention Strategies for helping with managing autistic behaviour issues.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories written to help children with autism overcome social skills deficits. A social skills story CAN act like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation the autistic child is struggling with.

A social skills story WILL use appropriate first person text and be from the child’s won perspective. It should be written in word format to allow for editing and personalization as this is important for children with autism and we all use different terminology with our children.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties USE visual images/pictures to help show the child on the spectrum visually what is happening making them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners this means that they think in pictures and find visual information easier to understand.

Social stories for autism behaviour difficulties answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about managing autistic behaviour issues using Intervention Strategies like social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find downloads of approx. 100 social stories.

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

As with typically developing children every child with autism spectrum disorder is going to be different, with their own unique set of needs and abilities.

But unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum WILL struggle to naturally learn social awareness skills and behaviours.

Autism is a neurological disorder which affects how the child on the spectrum processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts and behaves. These deficits ARE common to autism and are generally referred to as social skills deficits.

Although there is no cure for autism there ARE some very GOOD resources that can help. For example: Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder like social skills stories, communication picture cards, flash cards and PECS.

Probably the most significant resource for teaching kids with ASD ARE social skills stories. These were first developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with.

Typically the vast majority of kids with ASD WILL have problems with social awareness skills, therefore social stories ARE implemented to help overcome these difficulties.

A social skills story WILL act like a visual framework or plan of the skill the child on the autism spectrum needs help with or is finding stressful – like for example making friends, asking questions, sharing and so on…

The social skills story WILL give exact information in a manner that the child on the autism spectrum CAN understand and always from the child’s own perspective, using first person text.

Visual images/pictures ARE a strong means of communication for ALL children with autism as they tend to be mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, this makes social skills stories ideal.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder WILL also answer the ever so important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “how” and WILL also offer the child an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness on most kids with ASD.

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder such as social skills stories CAN be viewed at http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will be able to gain immediate downloads of around 100 social skills stories.

These social stories may be edited and need NO formal training to use. We all use different terminology with our children therefore social stories need to be editable as well as printable so that they may be taken to wherever the child needs the help.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Social awareness skills ARE not naturally learnt by young people with autism, unlike their typically developing peers children with autism DO NOT people watch and lack the ability to naturally learn skills the rest of us take for granted.

Many young people with autism struggle with friendships and find social interaction difficult to master this can lead to misunderstandings and at times social isolation.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies like social stories, flash cards, PECS and so on…

Using Intervention Strategies is beneficial and has been proven to work.

Typically people with autism tend to be VISUAL thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures and images. Therefore teaching strategies should be predominantly visual, like social stories for example.

The social story is a short visual representation of a skill, situation or behaviour that the child with autism is struggling to master.

The social story breaks the skill into smaller pieces and describes the skill by means of first person text and visual images/pictures. It WILL act like a visual plan or framework which WILL help the child with autism to feel more comfortable and less stressed, confused or anxious.

Social stories answer the “WH” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most people with autism.

Social stories ARE used for teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism such as: asking other kids to play, asking questions, having a conversation, being able to listed and so on…

No two children with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore it is important that the social story you are using is editable like the social stories found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

The social story needs to also be written from the child’s own perspective and be printable.

Visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com for immediate download of 100 social skills stories for various skills, behaviours, activity: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Other social stories CAN be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Social awareness skills ARE not naturally learnt by young people with autism, unlike their typically developing peers children with autism DO NOT people watch and lack the ability to naturally learn skills the rest of us take for granted.

Many young people with autism struggle with friendships and find social interaction difficult to master this can lead to misunderstandings and at times social isolation.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies like social stories, flash cards, PECS and so on…

Using Intervention Strategies is beneficial and has been prove effective. Typically children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in images and pictures and will use speech/language as secondary.

This means that Visual Intervention Strategies WILL be far easier for them to understand. Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories need NO formal training to use and can be implemented easily.

The autism social story is a short descriptive piece of text that is specifically written to help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum. The autism social story USES visual images/pictures to describe the skill or situation from the autistic child’s own perspective.

It WILL act like a visual plan of framework of the skill or situation, helping children with autism to feel more comfortable with and in the situation, giving them the opportunity to understand what is expected of them and what in return they CAN expect from others.

The autism social story will help teach social and communication skills to kids on the spectrum by answering the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism using flash cards…

Flash cards ARE small laminated cards with images/pictures printed onto the front of them, some also have small amounts of text. The cards CAN be used as an exchange – for example at snack time the card CAN be given to the teacher in exchange for what is printed onto the front of the card – an apple for example and so on…

Flash cards ARE an excellent means of communication they are also useful around the classroom showing where the bathroom is, the pencil tray and so on… The flash card is also used on visual timetables, now and then boards, choices boards and other means of communication.

To learn more and see examples of autism social stories and flash cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Teaching Social Skills to ASD Students

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

Typically ASD students have social skills deficits: this means that they WILL struggle with social awareness, communication and imagination skills. They may also display sensory processing and obsessive behaviours.

The characteristics of social skills deficits ARE common to autism spectrum disorder. Therefore teaching strategies for ASD students should be geared to help the ASD student overcome these difficulties.

Social skills ARE important especially in the classroom or school environment. Teaching social skills to ASD students CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies.

Intervention Strategies should be visual, research shows us that the majority of those with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures and use speech/language as a secondary language.

So using Visual Intervention Strategies is beneficial. There is a wide variety of Visual Intervention Strategies that CAN be used for teaching social skills to ASD students, such as autism social skills stories, communication picture cards, PECS and so on…

Visual Intervention Strategies like autism social skills stories are good teaching strategies for ASD students and CAN be implemented easily and will need NO formal training to use. They ARE simple short descriptive stories normally written to help teach a social, communication, imagination or behaviour.

For example a social story CAN be used to help the student with ASD to develop friendships, ask questions, stay on task, follow school rules, deal with recess and so on.

A social story will follow a set pattern of sentence type and WILL always be written from the ASD students own perspective. It should be Visual and written in word format to allow editing and personalization we all use different terminology and each story should allow for this.

Typically autism social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, where and when as well as HOW and should offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in those with autism spectrum disorder.

Therefore teaching social skills to ASD students using social stories is beneficial. Communication picture cards ARE used in a similar manner. They are excellent for promoting communication skills. For example communication picture cards ARE useful at snack time and CAN be used as an exchange by the student with ASD: a card showing a picture CAN be given to the teacher as an exchange for what is on the card, for example an apple and so on..

Communication picture cards ARE also used effectively on Visual timetables, choices boards and around the classroom showing for example where the coat hooks are the bathroom, sink, pencil tray and so on…

To learn more about teaching social skills to ASD students using social stories and communication picture cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Students with ASD social supports

Sunday, February 12th, 2012

The main characteristics of autism spectrum disorder ARE social awareness deficits, communication difficulties and imagination deficits, as well as some sensory processing issues and obsessive behaviours.

Typically most children on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, this meas that they think in pictures/images and tend to use speech/language as a secondary tool.

So how CAN this knowledge help us with finding students with ASD social supports?

There ARE a wide variety of supports and tools for autism spectrum disorder, typically the most significant supports and tools for autism WILL be those which ARE visual, for example, PECS, communication picture cards (flash cards), social skills stories and visual social story cards.

For many students with ASD school can be confusing at times and quite chaotic. Typically children on the spectrum like set patterns and routines and WILL dislike any changes to routines or suprises, they WILL PREFER things to remain on an even level.

Therefore most students with autism WILL find particular times of the school day such as recess, break time, PE etc confusing. Using social supports like social stories and communication picture cards CAN help them to cope with and be more setteled during these times of the day.

Social stories ARE short descriptive stories relating to a skill, activity, event, behaviour etc that the child with autism spectrum disorder finds difficult. The social story can act like a visual framework or step by step plan detailing visually what is happening and expected of them.

Social stories and communication picture cards ARE excellent supports and tools for autism to use in and around the classroom and school, they ARE also excellent for at home and ALL other areas the child with autism finds difficult. Using first person text, always from the perspective of the child, the social story uses images/pictures to describe the situtation or skill in a manner the student with autism can better understand.

To learn mre about social stories and picture communication cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school
Alternativelly visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social Stories for ASD Students

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures and use speech / language as secondary.

Having this knowledge can make teaching the ASD student much easier. Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories for ASD students ARE used with great affect.

A social story is written to describe a situation, skill or behaviour in terms of the relevant social cues. The social story is typically always written from the ASD students perspective and will give an accurate description of the skill, situation or behaviour.

The goal of the social stories for ASD students is to help the student feel more comfortable with and in the situation. Social stories for ASD students ARE written to help children with autism spectrum manage their own behaviour during a specific social situation by describing and answering the “wh” questions where the activity will take place, when it will occur, what will happen, who is involved, and why the child should behave in a certain way.

The social story will also give the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Social stories should ideally follow a specific sentence pattern of: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and Control sentences in a defined manner.

Social stories for ASD students should USE visual images / pictures and be editable, no two kids with ASD will ever be the same and we all use different terminology within our own classroom, therefore editability is important to personalize and make the story relevant to each child on the spectrum.

When the social story is first implemented, the teacher must be certain that the ASD student understands the social story and the skill being taught. Once the teacher has read through the story a few times with the child the ASD student can then read the story independently, read it aloud to an adult, or listen as the adult reads the story. The most appropriate method is dependent upon the individual abilities and needs of the ASD student.

Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories for ASD students can be used for various situations and skills for example: Recess, Assembley, Shared reading, Taking turns, Asking other kids to play, Circle Time and so on. For a full list available for immediate download visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Alternativelly visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Using Autistic Social Stories

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Autistic Social Stories are a VISUAL SUPPORT that is USED for teaching communication and social skills to children with autism and related disabilities.

Autistic Social Stories WILL give the autistic individual accurate information about those situations that he/she may find difficult or confusing. The skill or situation is described in detail using first person text and VISUAL images/pictures with key focus being given to the social cues.

Focus on the the important social cues, WILL provide the autistic individual with an idea of what WILL happen, the actions and reactions that might be expected of him/her, and why.

Using Autistic Social Stories WILL answer the “wh” questions - who, what, where, when and why as well as “how” and WILL provide the child on the autism spectrum with an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of considerable weakness in many children with autism.

The main idea of the social story is to increase the autistic individuals understanding of and to make him/her more comfortable in the situation. The social story also aims to help the child on the autism spectrum find ways of coping with skills and situations that he/she is struggling with.

Autistic Social Stories are a VISUAL SUPPORT that CAN be used for various situations and skills, is easy to implement and WILL need NO formal training to use. It should be editable as no two individuals with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

To see examples and to find out more information about using Autistic Social Stories for your child on the autism spectrum visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Supporting a Teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Wednesday, February 8th, 2012

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a life long disorder which affects how an individual communicates and relates to other people. Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term that includes many levels of disability from low non-verbal teens to high functioning Asperger Teenagers.

The teenage years for the majority of us are our most social years, but for teenagers with autism these years CAN be fraught with stress, tension, anxiety and confusion.

The transition from childhood to adolescents is called puberty, our bodies change, friendships change, our environment can often change, we develop sexually and we develop socially, our once accepted childish behaviours are now frowned upon and we are expected to “Grow up”.

So how WILL these changes affect a teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder”?

Being autistic is NOT easy, and being the parent or teacher of an autistic teenager is NOT going to be an easy ride either!

However there ARE treatements which help you in supporting a teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder like social skills stories. These ARE short descriptive pieces of text which ARE written to help children and teenagers cope with and understand skills, situations and behaviours which confuse of make them anxious.

The adolescent years and puberty ARE difficult subjects for parents and teachers to deal with, using social skills stories can help with autism and puberty, by answering the important questions who, where, what, when and whay as well as how and will offer an insight into whats happening and how other people are feeling, this is an area of marked weakness in most teenagers with autism,

A social story WILL act like a visual framework or plan showing the teen with ASD visually whats occuring. The social story is written from the perspective of the teen with ASD and WILL use first person text, it should be colourful and easy to edit as no two teens are the same and we all use different  terminology therefore editability is important.

Supporting a teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder need not be fraught with battles social stories WILL help with autism and puberty, hygiene issues, self help issues, social awareness skills, communication difficulties and transitions as well as changes to routines which is also an area of difficulty for many autistic individuals.

To learn more about supporting a teenager with Autism Spectrum Disorder and to get immediate downloads of social stories for teenagers with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Alternatively hygiene social stories for teenagers with autism can also be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

Other social stories can be downloaded at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Autistic Visual Supports

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Individuals with autism ARE typically “Visual Thinkers - Visual Learners”, this means that they think in pictures and images and use speech / words as a secondary language.

“I think in pictures. Words are like a second language to me…when somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures… One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills.” (Grandin, 1995).

Therefore presenting information and guidance visually will have a much better impact on individuals with autism.  There are a number of visual supports for autism which WILL help your child on the spectrum learn skills and behaviours that they find confusing, stressful or simply do not understand.

Autistic Visual Supports like: Social Skills Stories, Communication Picture Cards (flash cards), PECS and so on CAN be quickly and easily implemented and need NO formal training to use.

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive visual representations of a skill or behaviour. The social story breaks the skill down into smaller components, removes and un-necessary fluff or language and explains How and why something happens.

The social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, why and when and provides an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.


Autistic Visual Supports - Communication Picture Cards (flash cards)
ARE small laminated cards depicting an image or skill. For eample the Communication Picture Cards can be USED as an exchange -  the child with ASD hands over a picture card in retuen for the item on the card  -for example an apple at snack time and so on.

The Communication Picture Cards are also USED on visual timetables, as pointers around the home or in school, on chices boards, now and next boards and as a communication tool.

Both Social Skills Stories and Communication Picture Cards ARE available from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

To learn more about Autistic Visual Supports and how they can benefit your child with ASD visit today and download Social Skills Stories which can be adapted to suit individual needs, no two children are the smane and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore it is important that the social story you choose is editable.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Autistic Spectrum Disorder Interventions

Monday, February 6th, 2012

Intervention strategies ARE mainly used to help OVERCOME the deficits and abnormal behaviours often displayed by children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Autistic Spectrum Disorder Interventions CAN help increase the quality of life as well as help the autistic child reach his / her full potential. Interventions ARE typically tailored to individual needs, for example a non-verbal autistic child may find PECS and picture cards more suitable, while a verbal autistic child may find social stories more beneficial.

Studies show that Intervention strategies ARE beneficiaul to ALL children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder once the correct strategy is in place. For the purpose of this article I am going to focus on social stories and communication picture cards.

Social stories ARE one of the most significant Intervention strategies that has been introduced over the last twenty years. The social story is a short almost comic like description of a skill or behaviour that is broken down in to smaller easier to understand sections.

For example: most children with autism struggle to hold and start conversations, this can have a knock on affect and the child may struggle to amke and maintain friendships. A social story can act as a visual framework or plan and break down the steps needed to approach and ask another child to play, reducing stress and anti-social behaviours.

A child with autism is typically a VISUAL learner, this means that they will find visual information easier to use, with speech / language as secondary, thus social stories ARE commonly VISUAL.

Using visual images / pictures the social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, when and whay as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism.

Characteristically social stories ARE written in first person text and will always be from the autisic childs own perspective. The social story should be editable and easy to personalize as no two individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our own child.

Autistic Spectrum Disorder Interventions like communication picture cards (flash cards) ARE typically used to help with communication difficulties. For example a non-verbal autistic child can have a selection of communication picture cards enabling them to communicate their own needs. At snack time the child may wish to have an apple for example so will give the teacher the card showing an apple in return for the card the teacher will give the child the apple and so on…

The communication picture cards can have a variety of uses - on visual timetable, now and next boards, choices boards, displayed around the home and classroom as a reminder for example of where the toilet is, coat pegs and so on. The communication picture cards ARE also used for communication the teacher can show the child with autism what is expected of them for example - recess, assembley etc by pointing to a picture card, giving the child a gentle prompt as to what is happening or about to happen, again reducing stress and confusion.

To learn more about social stories and communication picture cards and to see an example visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social Skills Teaching for Kids with Autism

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

Kids with Autism generally have difficulties with social awareness skills.

Unlike typically developing children that naturally develop social awareness skills through people watching, their peers, parents and the environment.

A distinct lack of social skills can make it difficult for kids with Autism to develop and maintain friendships which in turn could lead to social isolation and in some cases even bullying.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism WILL help provide your child with the tools he needs to understand and function in social situations.

Kids with Autism have difficulties understanding that not everyone will share their opinion, interests, thoughts and feelings, a child on the spectrum will not pick up on social cues from the other person, this can lead to misunderstandings and confusion for the child on the spectrum.

Social skills teaching for kids with Autism can help teach your child to recognize the feelings of others.

For example tools like flash cards (picture cards) or social stories for autism can help as an intervention strategy to teach social awareness skills. By using flash cards or social stories for autism children with Autism you can help guide your child in most social situations.

Social stories for autism ARE visual which is important for children with Autism. Typically most children with Autism are visual thinkers and learners, this means that they think in pictures, with speech / language as secondary.

The social story looks much like a comic script and acts like a visual plan or framework of the skill or situation, such as making friends, approaching people, starting conversations, sharing and so on all skills that a child on the spectrum may struggle with.

The social story answers the “wh” questions - who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. They are easy to implement and shoud be editable as no two kids are ever going to be the same and we all use different terminology with our kids.

Social stories for autism can be used for many different situations and skills
- for example self-help skills, changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and so on. To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Autism Supports and Treatments

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can come a s a great shock to many parents.

It is thought that an average of 1 in every 150 babies is going to be given a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder before they attend school, this number is astonishing. Research into autism suggests that there is no one reason for autism, and that there is no cure.

While there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, there are various autism supports and treatments available that can and will help with the symptoms of autism.

Autism supports and treatments can help  with disruptive behaviors, and teach self-help skills that allow for greater independence.  So what are the main symptoms of autism? social awareness deficits, communication difficulties both in verbal and non-verbal communication, imagination skills deficits as well as some stereotypical behaviours and sensory processing issues.

Autism supports and treatments ARE often reffered to as “Intervention Strategies”

Which Intervention Strategies will work for your child is mainy dependant on your child’s own personal abilities. No two children with autism spectrum disorder will ever be the same, and therefore the approach will be different. However one of the most significant treatments of autism is Social Skills Stories and ARE adaptable to suit all.

Social Skills Stories ARE used to help teach social awareness skills, deal with communication difficulties and help the child on the spectrum overcome many of the symptoms of autism that they display.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill or behaviour from the child’s own perspective, breaking the skill or behaviour down into small relevant chunks that the child on the spectrum can understand.

The social story looks much like a comic script with visual images and small pices of first person text. Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in pictures and will gain far more from visual intervention strategies like social  stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.

Commonly visual intervention strategies like the social story will answer the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will also provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum disorder.

To implement social skills stories for autism and to learn more about what autism supports and treatments are avauilable visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Alternatively you will find immediate download of socials stories for autism from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills