Archive for January, 2011

How to write social stories for children with autism

Wednesday, January 26th, 2011

A social story is an Intervention Strategy used to help a child with ASD understand a skill or behavior that they are struggling with.

 

For the vast majority of parents of children with autism social skills stories are the perfect solution. What are social stories? And how WILL they help a child with ASD improve his/her social skills and behaviors?

 

What are social stories? Simply put; a social story is a short descriptive visual plan or framework much like a comic script. A social story follows a set formula that can help a child with autism learn and master skills they otherwise struggle with.

 

A social skills story uses first person text, and is generally written from the child’s own perspective. Written in a consistent manner and aimed at an individual with social skills deficits to help establish and encourage positive social interactions and behaviors.

 

The symptoms of autism means an individual on the spectrum will almost certainly have social skills deficits. Simply put: social skills deficits make it hard for an individual on the spectrum to make sense of the world we live in and process information. A child with ASD will generally prefer routine and structure and things to remain constant with no changes to daily routines, which can make our at times chaotic and unpredictable world confusing and the cause of anxiety.

 

Social skills stories are written by therapists, teachers and parents of children with autism to prepare them for experiences and changes to routines. Social skills stories can be on issues as varied as tooth brushing, visiting grand parents, recess even visiting the dentist or hairdresser.

 

Many parents of children with autism, caregivers and teachers create social skills stories to help teach social and communication skills and behaviors within the family and school setting.

 

Social stories are used to help children plan and mange transitions, ask appropriate questions, and calm down successfully.

 

An Intervention strategy like social stories are generally visually rich giving the autistic child visual cues helping them identify and understand the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced. It is believed that children with autism tend to be visual thinkers and learners making the social story an ideal concept. Visual images in the social story for autism help make the social story’s content and purpose clearer.

 

When looking at how to write social stories for children with autism these factors should be considered:

 

A Social Story should describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses in a specifically defined style and format.

 

The goal of a social story for autism is to provide accurate information and clarity in a reassuring manner that can be understood by the autistic child or young person.

 

Social skills stories are used as an Intervention strategy for most behavior and skills the autistic child or young person needs help with.

 

To find out more about how to write social stories for children with autism and gain immediate downloads of various social skills stories visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Methods and tips for teaching children with autism social skills

Monday, January 24th, 2011

Children with autism spectrum disorder have marked difficulties with social skills and communication, these unique difficulties that can make more traditional methods of teaching social skills less effective.

 

Many children with autism spectrum disorders have communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication and language.

 

Autism is an umbrella term for a large spectrum of symptoms that fall on the autistic scale, the severity of the disability can vary widely between children.

 

Most autistic children will prefer routine, and will not like any deviations or changes to their daily routine.

 

When something unexpected happens or a routine has to change for whatever reason, many autistic children will find this difficult to cope with. Many will resort to behaviours such as stereotypical autistic symptoms such as rocking, and repeating the same word or phrase. For children with autism spectrum disorder this repetition is calming, parents and teachers should try and find methods and tips for teaching children with autism to cope with changes in a routine.

 

A good teaching tip for teachers of autistic students is to always have a visual schedule written down and displayed, so that the autistic student can refer to this throughout the day which can help re-assure and calm the autistic student.

 

A visual schedule is exactly that a visual plan of the daily tasks and activities, visual support cards are placed on a board in sequence showing what is going to happen and when through the day, the student can refer to the visual schedule for re-assurance and to help stay on task.

 

Another good use for visual support cards are to help children with autism spectrum disorder get across their needs, for example a toilet break or what they would like to drink etc. The idea being the child with ASD can give a teacher or parent the visual support card in exchange for what they require.

 

However, sometimes things don’t always run smoothly and routines even those mapped out on the visual schedule will need to change, this can throw a child with ASD into panic.

 

Using Intervention strategies such as social skills stories as well as visual support cards will help address this issue.

 

Intervention Strategies like social skills stories are probably one of the major methods and tips for teaching children with autism social skills. A social story can act like a role model. Social stories show visually by answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. So in this example let’s say the fire bell is due to be tested, you don’t know when just that at some point during the day it will sound and everyone is expected to assemble outside including your student with autism.

The best way of dealing with this situation would be to use Intervention strategies like social stories. The social story can be read on the day or a few days in advance and then repeated on the day in question, you can share with your student with autism what will happen and why and what they will be expected to do, you can show them visually, the social story will use images as well as text and will be written in an easy to digest manner.

 

Social skills stories are generally visual; we know children with autism tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, social skills stories use this concept.

 

The social story can help re-assure the autistic student of what is happening and what to do.

 

Social stories are generally easy to use and can be implemented for many different reasons such as: changes to routine, transitions, learning new skills, re-enforcing already learnt skills, encouraging positive behaviours, for stereotypical autistic symptoms, communication difficulties and for helping to show and explain skills or situations the child with ASD struggles to understand – for example recess, asking questions, using a telephone, visiting Grandma or the dentist and so on.

 

As you can see visual support cards and social skills stories are very useful and considered excellent methods and tips for teaching children with autism social skills

 

To learn more about social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for autistic students: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

To learn more about visual support cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

ASD intervention strategies

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

There are various intervention strategies for children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects how the individual; processes information, thinks, socially interacts, communicates and behaves.

The symptoms of autism vary between individuals, however all kids with autism will have social skills deficits: Deficits in social skills affects the child’s social interaction skills, will cause communication difficulties, and difficulties with imagination as well as sensory processing issues.

It is often noted that kids with autism live in a very literal world often referred to as “Autism Own World”.

Intervention strategies are used to help overcome social skills deficits and pave the way to positive behaviours.

Intervention strategies like social skills stories are used to help with situations and skills like: transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, hygiene issues, communication difficulties, social interaction deficits and HELP pave the way to positive behaviours.

Autistic children tend to prefer structure and routines and dislike changes. Many children with ASD struggle to find and maintain friendships with their peers.

Understanding your autistic child is difficult, ASD intervention strategies ARE designed to HELP you teach and re-enforce social and communication skills and behaviours. ASD intervention strategies can make the difference in helping your autistic child reach his or her full potential

ASD intervention strategies help the ASD child understand the world they live in, probably them most popular strategy is social skills stories.

Social skills stories are short descriptive pieces of text normally written in first person text and from the autistic child’s own point of view.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is being diagnosed far more these days. Research into pervasive developmental disorder has suggested that using visual support tools such as autism social stories has impacted on the lives and families of those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder such as ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder)

Research suggests the vast majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures, making autism social stories the ideal intervention strategy to use.

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with autism.

ASD intervention strategies such as autism social stories are used for all situations and activities the ASD child may be confused by or struggling with, for example: Going to the dentist, making friends, play, a new car, brushing their hair and so on.

For immediate download of autism social stories for children with ASD visit: www.autismsocialstories.com

Or alternatively visit any of the following sites for more information and social stories.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Review: Social Stories Explained

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Example of autism social stories: social stories follow a set formula and are made up of four sentence types:

Example of autism social stories sentence type:

Descriptive sentences: The bell rings at the end of playtime, the children all line up ready to go back to class.

Directive sentences: I am in yellow class, I sit at the front of the class, and I listen to my teacher when she is talking

Perspective sentences: When the bell rings at the end of break time the children know it is time to go back to class

Control sentences: I will remember to line up quietly at the end of break time.

Review: Social Stories Explained: To write a good clear social story you should aim to include all or some of the ABOVE sentence types,  avoid direct don’ts like do not talk in class, as this is an order, and sometimes an autistic child may find this difficult.

Autistic children live in a literal world and will take everything you say as true.

So for example; if you say do not talk in class, this should be followed by unless my teacher asks me too.

A social story should answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is a marked weakness in children with autism.

The social story is generally visual as most children with autism are visual thinkers, meaning they think in pictures and images and language is secondary. Written from the autistic child’s point of view and should be editable, as no two children with autism are ever the same and we all use different terminology.

Social Stories are used to help practise for a skill or situation the child with autism is struggling with as well as with transitions, changes to routines, teaching new skills, coping with unexpected situations, social situations, communication difficulties and paving the way for positive behaviours

For more information on social stories and to see an example visit www.autismsocialstories.com the home of specially written social stories that work

Printable social stories for kids with autism

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Autistic children tend to prefer structure and routine, and can become stressed and anxious when things change.

Generally most autistic children are visual thinkers; Which means they think in pictures or images, and language is secondary.

Therefore when speaking try and make sentences short and precise do not give lengthy explanations and try to use visual images, graphs or pictures to help with your explanation or lesson. This way the child on the spectrum will be far more likely to understand what it is you’re trying to put across or say.

Another thing to remember is not to string a long list of instructions together a child on the spectrum may have problems remembering this.

The thing to remember here is that autistic children are visual thinkers and a long verbal list will be easily forgotten. Break the list up into smaller more easily managed chunks and wherever possible add visual clues, like pictures and images this is easier to remember.

So for example when teaching a child on the spectrum about feelings, parents, teachers and care givers can achieve far better results by using visual strategies such as printable social stories for kids with autism.

Typically developing children can read facial expression and body language and are able to interpret thoughts, feelings, emotions and language that the child on the spectrum can not. Having autism will affect the way the child processes information, thinks and acts this is called social impairments.

Autistic children have social impairments and will not be able to understand facial expressions, body language and communication both verbal and non-verbal. A child with autism will speak literally and say exactly what they mean or see, so don’t be offended by their sometimes abrupt and seemingly rude observations at times.

Using printable autism social stories for kids with autism is a good mean’s of explaining feelings to  a child with autism, by giving them visual cues on what is expected from them, and what they can expect in certain situations.

For example “nick names” children with autism may have difficulties understanding why we have pet names for each other, or why their friends may call each other odd names! Printable autism social stories for kids with autism can act as means of explaining this a bit like a role model, helping the autistic child understand why people use nick names.

There are many different social situations and tasks a normally developing child will accomplish easily.

But for children with autism can be stressful and cause anxiety, this is where social stories can help by explaining the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “how” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others all helping the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable. Social stories are intervention strategies that are generally visual, written in first person text and always from the point of view of the autistic child.

Social stories can be used for transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, coping with hygiene issues and helping to pave the way to positive behaviours.

A good source of autism social stories is

www.autismsocialstories.com For a wide variety of issues, including: Making friends, having a conversation, asking questions, autism and going to the bathroom and many more!

Or for more specific social stories, visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/pottywww.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social and communication difficulties in children with Autism

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

All children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social impairments this is common to autism. It is these social impairments that cause social and communication difficulties in children with Autism.

 

Even though all autistic individuals have social impairments the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language is also problematic.

 

For example: kids with autism display communication difficulties such as; misunderstanding simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally, like metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “wait a minute”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to social impairments sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that the autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments in the autistic child, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However there are treatments of autism which address social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder such as visual support cards and social stories.

 

Probably one of the major treatments of autism available is social skills stories, used widely by parents, care givers teachers and other professionals as a positive Intervention strategy excellent for addressing social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are an Intervention strategy which can be implemented and used for situations such as changes to routines, transitions, learning new skills and pave the way for positive behaviours…

 

Social skills stories are treatments of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

A social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan a role model answering the key “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. A social skills story will give the key points, allowing the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with, thus reducing stress.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for addressing social and communication difficulties in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Managing anxiety overload in a child with autism

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term used for a wide range of spectrum disorders.

 

Probably one of the major issues of autism is managing anxiety overload in a child with autism.

 

For a child with autism the symptoms of anxiety can be severe. Children on the autism spectrum do not develop in the normal manner and have difficulties with social and communication skills and behaviours which can cause anxiety and stress to the autistic child.

 

For example children on the spectrum have difficulties making friends and reading the “unspoken rules of social interaction” this can cause social blunders and anxiety overload in a child with autism.

 

Managing anxiety overload in a child with autism is going to be different to that of dealing with anxiety in typically developing children.

 

This is because children on the autism spectrum do not develop in the normal manner; children on the autism spectrum have social skills deficits: these social skills deficits are in social interactions, communication skills and imagination. These deficits make skills and situations the rest of us may think of as fun or normal stressful and can be the cause of autistic anxiety overload.

 

The most common cause of autistic anxiety overload is difficulties in social functioning. Children on the autism spectrum struggle with social skills and relationships, and are sometimes overwhelmed by social demands which can trigger autistic anxiety overload.

 

Other causes which can trigger autistic anxiety overload are sensory processing difficulties which are also common to autism. For example: Some stimuli in the environment can cause sensory processing difficulties and trigger autistic anxiety overload in children and adolescents with autism, these can be as simple as the ring of a phone, some fabrics, lights and noises and so on.

 

So looking managing anxiety overload in a child with autism

 

For some children and adolescents with autism difficulties and stress can arise from changes to routines, or they need to learn a new skill or behaviour.

 

Other sudden anxiety causes can be a traumatic experience, or inability to cope with the demands at school. Plus a distinct lack of both verbal and non-verbal communication skills can also trigger autistic anxiety overload.

 

Methods for autistic anxiety overload vary, however probably one the main methods for autistic anxiety overload is social stories, which can be used as an Intervention Strategy for dealing with changes, transitions and learning new skills.

 

This well known Intervention Strategy is easily implemented and can be very beneficial for helping children on the spectrum cope with and understand skills and situation which cause them anxiety and stress.

 

Social stories will answer the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, which is a marked weakness in autism.

 

Social stories are a visual strategy, most children with autism are generally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, social stories use this concept.

 

Parents, care givers and teachers can learn more about managing autism in the

Essential Guide To Autism

 

Plus learn more and get downloads of adaptable, editable and printable social stories from:

Autism Social Stories

.

 

For example children on the spectrum find friendships difficult to maintain and can misread the “unspoken rules of social interaction” which

The most common cause of autistic anxiety overload is difficulties in social functioning. Children on the autism spectrum struggle with social skills and relationships, and are sometimes overwhelmed by social demands which can trigger autistic anxiety overload.

 

Other causes of autistic anxiety overload can be sensory processing problems which are common to autism. For example: Some stimuli in the environment can cause sensory processing problems and trigger autistic anxiety overload in children and adolescents with autism, these can be as simple as the tag on the back of clothes, some fabrics, lights and noises and so on.

 

So looking at how to cope with anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

 

Many children and adolescents with autism will display difficulties when routines change, or they need to learn a new skill or behaviour. Other sudden anxiety causes can be a traumatic experience, or inability to cope with the demands at school. Plus a distinct lack of both verbal and non-verbal communication skills can also trigger autistic anxiety overload.

 

Treatments for autistic anxiety overload can vary, however probably one the main treatment for autistic anxiety overload is social stories, which can be used as an Intervention Strategy for dealing with changes, transitions and learning new skills.

 

This well known Intervention Strategy is easily implemented and can be very beneficial for helping children on the spectrum cope with and understand skills and situation which cause them anxiety and stress. A social story will answer the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, which is a marked weakness in autism.

 

The social story is a visual strategy, as most children with autism are generally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, social stories use this concept.

 

Parents, care givers and teachers can learn more about managing anxiety overload in a child with autism in the

Essential Guide To Autism

 

Plus learn more and get downloads of adaptable, editable and printable social stories from:

Autism Social Stories

How to cope with anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term used for a wide range of spectrum disorders.

 

Probably one of the major issues of autism is anxiety, which appears to be more prevalent in autistic children and adolescents than their adult peers.

 

How to cope with anxiety symptoms in autistic child? The approach for dealing with anxiety in autism is different to that of dealing with anxiety in typically developing children.

 

This is because children with autism spectrum disorder do not develop in the normal manner and have difficulties with communication, social interaction and imagination skills and behaviours which typically developing children do not display.

 

The most common cause of autistic anxiety overload is difficulties in social functioning. Children on the autism spectrum struggle with social skills and relationships, and are sometimes overwhelmed by social demands which can trigger autistic anxiety overload.

 

Other causes of autistic anxiety overload can be sensory processing problems which are common to autism. For example: Some stimuli in the environment can cause sensory processing problems and trigger autistic anxiety overload in children and adolescents with autism, these can be as simple as the tag on the back of clothes, some fabrics, lights and noises and so on.

 

So looking at how to cope with anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

 

Many children and adolescents with autism will display difficulties when routines change, or they need to learn a new skill or behaviour. Other sudden anxiety causes can be a traumatic experience, or inability to cope with the demands at school. Plus a distinct lack of both verbal and non-verbal communication skills can also trigger autistic anxiety overload in children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Treatment for autistic anxiety overload can vary, however probably one the main treatment for autistic anxiety overload is social stories, which can be used as an Intervention Strategy for dealing with changes, transitions and learning new skills.

 

This well known Intervention Strategy is easily implemented and can be very beneficial for helping children on the spectrum cope with and understand skills and situation which cause them anxiety and stress. A social story will answer the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others, which is a marked weakness in autism.

 

The social story is a visual strategy, as most children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, social stories use this concept.

 

Parents, care givers and teachers can learn more about autism in the

Essential Guide To Autism

 

Plus learn more and get downloads of adaptable, editable and printable social stories from:

Autism Social Stories

How do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Autism will affects a person’s ability to communicate, socially interact and use their imagination skills it also causes sensory processing issues and behavioral difficulties as well as anxiety and stress.

Any anxiety symptoms in autistic children can become worse when changes, transitions or new skills need learning. For most autistic children even positive or fun changes like birthdays or new clothes can cause sensory processing issues, and trigger anxiety in the autistic child.

So how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Parents, caregivers and teachers can become stressed when changes are looming knowing that the change will no doubt trigger anxiety in the autistic child. Methods for dealing with anxiety in autism are the best course of action.

Parents, caregivers and teachers are finding it helpful to use methods for dealing with anxiety in autism such as social stories and autistic visual aids to prepare the child on the spectrum for the upcoming disruption.

Maybe your child is due to visit the doctor or dentist, social stories and autistic visual aids will prepare your child for the impending visit; they can show who he will see at the doctor or dentist, what the doctor will be like, and what sort of things to expect.

This process can help with sensory processing issues and the anxiety of a change to routine.

Consequently on the day of the doctor visit your child on the spectrum will have prepared and practiced the situation and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Many parents like the idea of introducing change in a positive way: This can be achieved by practicing change. For example, just for practice, give him a little extra TV time instead of homework time one night, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good.

Then step it up a bit by practicing change for example: Change Homework time from after to before dinner. The hardest changes are then introduced swapping for example TV time to chore time. This process can reduce autism anxiety.

Looking at how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Sometimes your child’s doctor may prescribe medications to help reduce autism anxiety. You and your doctor should monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions.

Most parents feel that medication should be the last resort. There are plenty of dietary and herbal remedies available which are equally useful in controlling anxiety in autism.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating and Autism Anxiety Overload in:

The Essential Guide To Autism

social stories

Autistic visual aids

 

 

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Nutritional Information

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This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

What can you do about autism anxiety symptoms?

Friday, January 14th, 2011

The symptoms of autism affect how an individual thinks and processes information.

Tony Atwood was once quoted as saying “Autism is anxiety looking for a target”. Autism and anxiety go hand-in-hand.

Communication difficulties both verbal and non verbal are common in individuals with autism. Individuals with autism generally appear to be locked inside their own world; these symptoms of autism can cause anxiety.

Anxiety and autism becomes even worse when there is a change in routine, generally children with autism prefer things to remain constant and the same. Even positive and “fun” changes, like a school trip or a visit to the park, can be autistic anxiety triggers, triggering negative even aggressive behaviours.

What can you do about autism anxiety symptoms? For parents of autistic children, it is a good suggestion to anticipate upcoming changes to routines and transitions and help your autistic child prepare for them.

Many parents of autistic children find it helpful to use Intervention Strategies such as: social skills stories, or visual support cards to help prepare their child for impending disruptions.

What can you do about autism anxiety symptoms, for example if you are planning a visit to Grandma, it will be helpful to use visual support cards to show your child where he is going, what it will be like, and what sort of things to expect. Intervention Strategies like social skills stories will also help explaining the “wh” questions - who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW”

Do this each day for three or four days prior to the trip, this will help prevent any unnecessary autistic anxiety triggers, making the trip more predictable, helping to re-assure the autistic child and relieve some of the stress they may feel

Other changes in the routine which are less enjoyable but still necessary such as a new teacher can be traumatic, as can moving to a new house. If at all possible, try to spread out the major changes. If you move to a new house, try to do it during the summer, so that your child won’t have to deal with the added anxiety of getting a new school and new teacher mid-year.

Looking at ways of dealing with anxiety and autism: Introduce your ASD child to “changes” in a positive way you can use Intervention Strategies to prepare for any changes: Try practicing with non-negative things first. For example, give your ASD child a little extra TV time instead of homework time one evening, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good.

Then try a neutral change for example: homework after dinner instead of before dinner, then a negative change for example: changing play time into chore time. This process can help your ASD child grow accustomed to the idea of change and learn to adapt without the onset of autistic anxiety triggers causing stress, confusion and upset.

For continual, ongoing anxiety in autistic children many parents of autistic children us anti-anxiety medications with their child, such as:

Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), these are also used for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. Prozac, Luvox, Zoloft and Anafranil are all common for anxiety in autistic children.

Your own doctor will help prescribe medication, for behavioural problems ASD children are often prescribed Antipsychotics such as Haldol, Fluphenazine and Chlorpromazine. These can reduce aggression in autistic kids, but sometimes also cause sedation and muscle stiffness.

All autistic kids are different. You child’s doctor will monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions.

Medication should be the last resort for autistic kids, not the first one. There are a number of natural remedies available if you don’t want to go down the drug route. But try behavioural and dietary modifications first, to see what improvements can be made naturally.

For information and to signup for a Free Newsletter about Autism please visit The Essential Guide to Autism

 

 

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What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS - Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas - but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Research Information about Autism and Supplementation

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

People with autism are especially prone to nutritional difficulties. Therefore, taking supplements to achieve a balanced nutritional state can be beneficial.

 

Nutrition and supplements are an important part of our lives; our bodies need certain nutrients to stay healthy. There are literally thousands of products on the market that can give your body the added nutrients it needs.

 

For people with autism however addressing autism and supplementation is not easy. For the majority of people with autism the proteins gluten and casein have been found to potentially worsen the symptoms of autism.


Research Information about Autism and Supplementation suggests in some cases, gluten and casein have in-fact increased the brains production of natural opiates, making foods that contain them practically addictive!

 

The vast majority of children on the spectrum are influenced by routines, which can be a real problem if unhealthy foods have crept into their diets!  And many parents will struggle to implement a balanced and healthy diet, therefore if a balanced healthy diet is implemented early, it is far easier for children on the spectrum to stick to it.


Your child’s doctor will be able to determine whether your child is getting the right balance of nutrients, by doing a simple blood test. The data from the test will show whether supplements or changes to diet are needed.

 

Defeat Autism Now! (DAN!) Medical Professionals are a good place to start because they have been especially trained to understand the challenges facing autistic children.

 

You may find your ASD child is lacking some of the common supplements that autistic children are often lacking or simply do not have at optimum levels of such as:

Selenium,

Calcium,

Magnesium,

Zinc,

Folinic acids,

Vitamins C and E,

Essential fatty acid,

Taurine, and various amino acids.


If you are about to begin giving supplements to your ASD child remember this should be done slowly, children with autism dislike changes, even those which are doing them some good.


It is a good idea at this stage to keep a diary of any behaviour changes the supplements have which can be discussed this with your doctor or nutritionist.


Research Information about Autism and Supplementation shows us in terms of positive and negative effects the result from the use of supplements, and a change in diet can be:

 

Positive changes:

Many parents of children with autism report a reduction in the severity of behaviours.

Many parents of children with autism report an improvement in managing behaviours and social interaction, which is a marked weakness in autism.

 

At this stage it is also important to note regressions in behaviour. If negative behaviours are observed, the supplement added should be reduced or eliminated.


Negotiating the diet and supplementation of an autistic child is a trial and error undertaking.

 

It is recommended that when first LOOKING INTO the diet and supplementation of an autistic child parents start small only purchasing in small quantities, if you buy a ton of a supplement that produces undesired results, you are stuck with a useless product.

 

It is important to work with your doctor or nutritionist, don’t just dole out supplements on an experimental basis; THIS CAN HAVE A DAMAGING AFFECT. Work with a doctor or a nutritionist to come up with a specific plan that is geared toward your child’s success.

 

This regiment should include frequent tests for metal toxicity, stool analysis, and tests for various amino acids and peptides.

 

There is much to think about when considering supplements for your autistic child. This process is very important and can improve the overall quality of their life.

You should not rush into changes with supplements for your autistic child, children on the spectrum dislike changes!

 

Give supplements time to work. Just as with your body it will take time for your child’s body to reap the benefit of a healthy diet and nutrition routine.

 

There are many more resources and information about autism: such as diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in: The Essential Guide To Autism

 

 

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Nutritional Information

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What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

About Autism Anxiety Overload In Autistic Children

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011

Looking at: About Autism Anxiety Overload In Autistic Children

The renowned autism expert Tony Atwood is fond of putting it this way: “Autism is anxiety looking for a target”. Autism and anxiety go hand-in-hand. Autism affects a person’s ability to communicate with others or to understand the world around him, and that’s bound to cause anxiety and panic sometimes.

 

Anxiety becomes even worse when there is a change in the autistic child’s routine. Even positive and “fun” changes, like a school field trip or a visit to the zoo, can increase anxiety and aggressive behaviors.


For parents, the best course of action is to anticipate upcoming changes and help your child prepare for them. Many parents find it helpful to use stories and pictures to prepare children for impending disruptions. If it’s a field trip to the zoo, for example, use pictures to show your child what he’ll see at the zoo, what the zoo will be like, and what sort of things to expect. Do this each day for three or four days prior to the trip. That way, when the trip actually happens, the child won’t be entirely out of his element, but will already understand and appreciate some of what will be happening.

 

Other changes in the routine are less enjoyable but still necessary. Getting a new teacher can be traumatic, as can moving to a new house. If at all possible, try to spread out the major changes. If you move to a new house, try to do it during the summer, so that your child won’t have to deal with the added anxiety of getting a new school and new teacher mid-year.

 

You can also introduce your child to the concept of “change” in a positive way by practicing with non-negative things. For example, just for practice, give him a little extra TV time instead of homework time one night, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good. Then practice with a neutral change (homework after dinner instead of before dinner), then with a negative one (changing play time into chore time). This process can help your child grow accustomed to the idea of change and learn to adapt without becoming anxious.

 

For continual, ongoing anxiety, many parents have begun using anti-anxiety medications for their autistic children. Usually, the medications are selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and are also used for obsessive-compulsive disorder and depression. Prozac, Luvox, Zoloft and Anafranil are all common for anxiety in autistic children.

 

For behavioral problems, antipsychotics such as Haldol, fluphenazine and chlorpromazine can be prescribed. These can reduce aggression in autistic kids, but sometimes also cause sedation and muscle stiffness.

 

All patients are different. You and your doctor should monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions. Medication should be the last resort for autism, not the first one. There are a number of natural remedies available if you don’t want to go down the drug route. But try behavioral and dietary modifications first, to see what improvements can be made naturally.

 

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating and About Autism Anxiety Overload In Autistic Children  in,

The Essential Guide To Autism 

 

 

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What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

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PLUS - Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas - but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Writing Social Stories for children with autism

Tuesday, January 11th, 2011

What are social stories?

 

Social stories are short descriptive stories which explain a skill or situation in terms of relative social cues, perspectives and common responses in a defined manner, using pictures or images and first person text, much like a comic script.

 

The goal of a Social Story is to present accurate information in a consistent and reassuring manner that children with autism can easily understand.

 

Social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago to help with communication difficulties in children with an ASD. Today, Social Stories are not only ideal for children with an ASD but are also a positive approach for adolescents and young people with autism and related communication disorders.

 

For children with an ASD communication both verbal and non verbal is an area of marked weakness, this is mainly due to social skills deficits which are common to all individuals with autism.

 

What are social skills deficits?

 

Social skills deficits are sometimes referred to as the triad of autistic impairments:

Social skills deficits

Communication deficits

Imagination deficits

 

These deficits are always present in individuals with autism to varying degrees, as with typically developing children no two ASD children are ever the same and development will vary.

 

Social Stories are used to focus on a specific skill or situation the child on the spectrum is struggling with for example: changes to routines, for most ASD children any changes to routines no matter how small can be a real problem, using a social story to explain the upcoming change can help reassure and prevent anxiety and stress.

 

Writing social stories for children with autism is an effective way of dealing with issues. A social story should contain Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and control sentences always be from the child’s point of view and in first person text.

 

Children on the spectrum tend to be visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, this concept is used in most social stories. The social story should map out the skill or situation using images and text. Answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, this is an area of weakness to individuals with autism.

 

A social story is like a role model or visual framework showing the social cues.  Social stories need no formal training to use and are editable, no two children are the same and we all use different terminology, therefore generally most social stories will need slight tweaks to make the content relevant to your child.

 

To learn more about implementing social stories and get downloads of social stories which have been already written for you to save you time visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will also gather information on writing social stories for children with autism as well as info on what are social stories and why do they help?

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Using Social Stories with Children

Monday, January 10th, 2011

Social Stories are used as an Intervention Strategy to teach social skills to children on the autism spectrum disorder scale.

 

Using social stories with children on the autism spectrum disorder scale has been proven effective and is today one of the major Intervention Strategies available, that is easy to implement and needs no formal training to use.

 

A social skills story is a simple Intervention Strategy that uses images and short pieces of text in a story like fashion, much like a comic script to describe a social situation or skill from the child’s perspective.

 

Social Stories are used for various situations, behaviours and skills; for example: A social skills story can be used to help prepare a child on the spectrum for transitions and changes to routines or to help the child on the spectrum learn new skills and behaviours or to re-enforce an already learnt skill.

 

The purpose of using social stories with children on the autism spectrum scale is to help them prepare and learn skills by practising the skill, the social skills story acts like a visual framework or visual plan mapping out the skill into small easy to understand pieces.

 

Social Stories are Intervention Strategies which answer the “wh” questions: who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW”  and give children with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others, which is an area of marked weakness for children on the autism spectrum scale.

 

Research shows teachers and parents alike are using Social Stories to help teach social skills to children on the autism spectrum disorder scale with positive results.

 

Each social skills story uses different sentence types: Perspective, Directive, Descriptive and Control sentences is a set formula. Most Social Stories are colourful and can be edited to suit each individual child, as no two children on the autism spectrum disorder scale are the same and we all use different terminology.

 

To learn more about Social Stories and how they teach social skills to children on the autism spectrum disorder scale as well as get immediate access to Social Stories which can be edited, personalized and printed making them convenient and easy to use visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Using social stories with children on the autism spectrum disorder scale is an effective Intervention Strategy used widely in school, colleges and homes by parents, teachers and other professionals teaching and caring for children with autism.

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school