ASD Social Stories

Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies which teach children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) self awareness, self help, calming and behaviour management skills as well as appropriate communication skills.

 

ASD social stories are written to help pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour. Unlike typically developing children a child on the spectrum will not naturally learn social and communication skills and behaviours and will NEED DIRECT TEACHING.

 

ASD social stories can be used for a wide variety of issues including hygiene, making friends, at school, out and about and in the home etc.

 

ASD Social stories are USED to help children on the autism spectrum cope with and plan for transitions, ask questions, hold conversations, go shopping and so on. Generally ASD social stories should contain images or photos, to help the child on the spectrum better understand what is being presented.

 

Mostly children on the autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, which means visual intervention strategies ARE much easier for them to understand.

 

Social stories will normally follow a set pattern of sentence type: Perspective, Descriptive, Directive, And Control sentences.

 

Social stories help teach a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling with by giving the child a clear outline much like a framework or visual plan of the skill or behaviour allowing them to visually see what is expected of them and why.

 

By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and by giving an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others.

 

This ability is missing in children with autism spectrum disorder and is often referred to as “mind blindness” as typically developing individuals we have a natural ability to read facial expression and body language and then determine what another person is feeling or thinking, this is missing in autistic individuals which can at times cause problems with social misunderstandings and so on.

 

Mostly autistic individuals live in a literal world and can be blind to the emotions and feelings of those around them making friendships hard to maintain and social rules hard to follow. By implementing ASD social stories YOU are able to help teach a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling to master. Acting like a role model a social story can be implemented easily and will need no formal training to use.

 

Most ASD social stories can be edited as no two autistic individuals will ever be the same and we all use different terminology with our own child etc, therefore a social story should be editable and easy to personalize.

ASD social stories can be printed for convenience of use, making them easy to use everywhere and anywhere they are needed.

 

Social stories ARE excellent visual intervention strategies for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and can be found on sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

By using social stories with your ASD child you can help reduce stress and unwanted behaviours and teach new skills leading to positive results.

 

To find out more about how a social story WILL HELP your ASD child visit any of these following sites: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder

Social stories were first developed round twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray. To aid the communication difficulties she was having with the autistic students she worked with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder have problems in three main areas of development: Social interaction skills, they may struggle to make friends, understand the unspoken rules of social interaction, be unable to recognise social cues and signals, not respect personal space and display at times weird or odd behaviours, many autistic students fail to understand school and class rules.

 

Communication difficulties with both verbal (spoken) language and non-verbal communication; For example gestures, sign language, reading or interpreting body language and facial expression.

 

AS well as imagination skills, children with autism spectrum disorder live in a very literal world and find make believe hard to understand a child with autism will also struggle with humour, pretend play. They may also display obsessive behaviours and fail to recognise or indeed understand why others may not share their interest.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder aim to HELP address these social skills deficits. All autistic children will have some or all of the above social skills deficits with varying degrees of severity dependant on where the child with autism falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE implemented to help with various skills and situations the child on the autism spectrum is struggling with for example making friends, washing their teeth, coping with recess, respecting personal space and so on.

 

Written in first person language in a consistent manner social stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give the child on the autism spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and actions of others.

 

Normally following a set pattern of sentence type a social story WILL act as a role model or VISUAL PLAN of the skill or situation.

 

We know children on the spectrum ARE mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, a good social story will follow this concept and USE visual images or pictures to show visually the skill or situation being taught or encouraged.

 

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder should be editable because we all use different terminology with our own child, they should be easy to personalize making them suitable for all ages and abilities.

 

To learn more about how social  skills stories can be implemented and to gain access to over 100 social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Teaching autistic kids social skills

Children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with social interactions. While typically developing children learn social skills naturally autistic kids do not. And will need special techniques to learn social skills.


Teaching autistic kids social skills can be done using visual intervention strategies and techniques.


Probably one of the major issues for autistic kids are their deficits in social and communication skills and often their understanding of self and those people around them is different from typically developing people.


It is often said that children on the autism spectrum appear to be locked in their own world and not interested in interacting with others. This can cause problems when the child is attending mainstream education. However there are techniques and strategies – visual intervention strategies – which can be used for teaching autistic kids social skills.


One of the major visual intervention strategies is social stories. Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help aid communication with the children on the autism spectrum she was working with, social stories have grown into one of the best and most used strategies for developing social and communications skills in children on the spectrum.


Social stories are short visual descriptive pieces of text that use visual images to describe a social situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, making visual strategies ideal tools. Images are a powerful means of communication that are universally understood by all, social stories use this concept much like a comic strip script that children on the autism spectrum can better understand.


Social skills stories break the skill or situation down into small sections “social cues” and answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.


By implementing social skills stories parents, care givers and teachers can help with teaching autistic kids social skills which can help with transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, encouraging already learnt skills, hygiene issues and much more.


To download social skills stories that are used for teaching autistic kids social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites where you will find appropriate social skills stories


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Social stories as Intervention Strategies

Social stories are written to describe a social or communication skill that a person with autism is struggling to understand.

 

Social skills stories describe a social situation in terms of relevant social cues which helps the person with autism understand what is happening and why giving them a chance to better understand.

 

Since their initial development almost twenty years ago social skills stories have grown into one of the most popular intervention strategies today.

 

While typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally from people watching and their environment, this ability is lacking in children with autism. Often referred to as the theory of mind or the inability to read people and recognise social cues.

 

For children with autism a distinct lack of social skills the theory of mind; can mean the child on the spectrum may be open to ridicule, teasing, bullying and at times isolation.

 

However, much can be done to help a child on the spectrum acquire appropriate social behaviour and communication skills; this help comes in the form of intervention strategies.

 

Social stories as Intervention Strategies has been proven effective; Social stories are used to describe the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images and first person text in a manner the child on the spectrum can understand.

 

Images and pictures ARE a powerful means of communication which is understood by all. Social stories follow this concept by using images or pictures to show visually the skill or situation.

 

Fully editable, printable and made easy to personalize social stories act as a role model or visual framework for the autistic child to use helping them with transitions, rehearse a skill or situation, prepare for a change to routine, learn a new skill, use appropriate communication, and overcome sensory issues.

 

To learn more about how social stories as intervention strategies WILL help your autistic child OVERCOME difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories normally follow a set pattern of sentence type which was first discovered by Therapist Carol Gray twenty years ago. Social stories are normally constructed and written from the point of view of the autistic child.

 

No two children are ever going to be the same, therefore social stories need to be editable so appropriate terminology can be used.

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Christmas with an autistic child

The Festive Season is upon us once more, for most families Christmas is a time to look forward to, but for many families with an autistic child Christmas may be a nightmare.

 

Children with autism at Christmas time are more likely to be stressed and anxious about NOT excited and eager like a typically developing child. Routines and stability go out the window around this time of year, with the sheer chaos of Christmas.

 

And as any parent of an autistic child knows any changes to routines can throw a child on the spectrum into panic mode and cause meltdowns, stress and anxieties.

 

Many families with an autistic child dread the Festive Season the sensory overload can be too much for many children with autism.

 

Intervention strategies ARE used as a means of HELPING children on the spectrum UNDERSTAND AND COPE with some of the issues they face around this time of the year.

 

Such as decorating the Christmas tree, many autistic children fail to understand why a tree is place inside the house and decorated. Intervention strategies such as social stories can be used to explain why in a way the child on the spectrum can understand and cope with.

 

For many families Christmas with an autistic child is stressful, intervention strategies can HELP remove some of the stress by helping the autistic child gain a better understanding of Christmas. Social stories are visual intervention strategies.

 

Social skills stories are short descriptive pieces of text, written from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, and using visual images or pictures to show the situation or skill much like a comic strip.

 

Using visual images is known to work with children on the spectrum as they are mainly visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, making visual intervention strategies like social skills stories excellent resources to use.

 

Many situations and skills can be addressed using social skills stories, a good social story will act as a role model or visual plan, breaking the situation down into smaller sections showing in a concise manner the “wh” questions – who, where, when, why and what, plus “How” as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others all helping to reduce anxieties, stress ad confusion.

 

A social story may be edited and personalized for convenience, to learn more about Christmas with an autistic child and how social stories for Christmas can help visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

 

Where you will find information and a selection of social stories for Christmas with your autistic child. Other social stories can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social stories for autistic kids

Deficits with social skills are common to autism. This means for many autistic kids problems with social interactions, communication difficulties and a distinct lack of imaginative skills. And unlike their typically developing peers the natural ability to “read people” and learn appropriate and essential life skills is missing meaning these skills are needed to be taught directly.

 

Therefore intervention strategies ARE implemented to help parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals teach and encourage their child on the spectrum to learn and use appropriate social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

 

Also common to autism are sensory processing issues, meaning the child on the spectrum may be either hyper or hypo sensitive and need help with this problem.

 

Social stories for autistic kids are used to help address deficits with social, communication and imagination skills and help with sensory processing issues.

 

Using intervention strategies like social stories has proven effective in many cases and is now one of the major autism resources used for helping autistic kids.

 

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive almost comic script like stories, using visual images to tell the child with autism how to deal with a certain situation or skill that they are struggling with.

 

For example tooth brushing, for many autistic kids this skill is difficult to master, the cold water, feel of the tooth brush and taste of the tooth paste can in many cases, due to sensory processing issues cause discomfort, anxiety and stress.

 

By implementing social skills stories you can show your child with autism the consequence of not brushing as well as the positive affects of brushing as well as explain the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what and give an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others as well as what’s  involved in and with this skill.

 

The vast majority of children with an ASD are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, this makes social stories an ideal intervention strategy as the stories are visual using images and pictures.

 

Social stories for autistic kids use visual images to show the skill, by breaking it into smaller sections, using first person language, following a set formula and in a manner the child on the spectrum will be able to understand.

 

Most social stories are editable, this is because no two children with an ASD are ever the same and we all use different terminology with our children, therefore parents or teachers are able to edit the social skills story to make the terminology relevant and personalize if this is needed.

 

Social stories for autistic kids can act as a role model or visual plan helping to teach the child with autism. Social stories can also be used to help with transitions, changes to routines, events, activities and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more bout how a social skills story could help your child with autism address deficits in social, communication and imagination skills visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child

Probably one of the most basic yet essential life skills is hygiene, from going to the toilet to eating habits, hygiene is essential for everyone.

 

Typically developing children will by the age of 5 – 6 be able to use basic hygiene skills like taking themselves to the toilet, washing their hands, brushing their teeth and so on.

 

But for children with autism hygiene can be a confusing and stressful skill to master. Common to autism are social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, making even basic skills like washing your teeth uncomfortable for a child on the spectrum.,

 

It is not uncommon for a child on the spectrum to be six years old before they master using the toilet, this of cause can lead to further problems. While your average three year old child can still fit into nappies it is not so easy to find nappies for your six year old child. Plus if your child with ASD is already attending school, soiling themselves can attract negative attention from their peers.


For many parents knowing how to teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child is frustrating, a lack of support and information can be a hindrance. However as with other social skills hygiene habits and routines can be taught effectively using intervention strategies such as social skills stories.


What are intervention strategies and how can they be implemented?

Intervention strategies are used to help children with autism, they are resources and methods which can be put into practise to help the child on the spectrum learn or cope with a situation, lesson, activity or skill that they are struggling to master.


Parents needing support and methods on how to teach essential hygiene skills to an autistic child can use intervention strategies designed to help with this issue. Strategies such as PECS, flash cards, mini schedules and Social Skills Stories are useful intervention strategies which can help do just that.

 

For the vast majority of children with autism learning is done visually, therefore any visual strategies chosen need to be visual. Visual strategies such as social skills stories are perfect for introducing new skills, brushing up on existing skills and as gentle reminders of already learnt skills, changes to routine, transitions and as guides to help with situations or activities the child on the spectrum does not understand.

 

For children with ASD sensory processing issues can make hygiene difficult, social skills stories can ease some of the tension many children with ASD feel when confronted with a hygiene task they are not comfortable with like for example brushing your teeth, or getting a haircut even.

 

Social stories explain visually the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “how” and give an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others, plus detail the consequence of for example not brushing your teeth etc.

 

Visually rich, using first person text and always from the point of view of the autistic person, a social skills story should be short and concise much like a visual plan or role model of the skill or situation the autistic person can understand.

 

The social story should be printable for convenience and editable, no two people are ever the same and we all use different terminology, therefore some social stories need to be tweaked to make them suitable for individuals.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and how they may benefit your autistic child or young person visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for your autistic child can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstoires.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

How social stories can benefit an autistic child

Social stories are normally short, descriptive, visual stories written to help children with autism navigate specific situations or skills that they struggle with.

 

The idea of social skills stories is to provide the child on the spectrum with an opportunity to rehearse social interactions, for example asking questions, having a conversation and making friends – which will help reduce anxiety and confusion.

 

Looking at how social stories can benefit an autistic child

 

Research suggests that social stories which follow a set format can really make a difference to children on the spectrum, helping them cope with situations, social skills and behaviours that they do not understand or find stressful.

 

Developed almost twenty years ago to help with communication issues in children on the spectrum, social stories have grown in popularity and use, today social stories are one of the major intervention strategies used to teach social and communication skills.

 

Parents and teachers need no formal training to use social stories, which can be implemented fairly easily.

 

Social stories can act like a role model or visual plan to the child on the spectrum. By breaking the skill or situation down into smaller sections, using first person text and visual images or pictures the social story describes the important “wh” questions  – who, where, why, when and what as well as “how” and gives an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

 

Autistic children struggle to see things from another persons perspective, which can cause hurt feelings and misunderstandings, a social skills story can help the autistic child see the other side of things.

 

For example a lot of autistic children do not recognise the need to respect personal space this can be uncomfortable for other children, a social skills story can help explain the need for personal space and the consequence of not respecting another persons personal space i.e. the person may avoid contact etc.

 

Therefore looking at how social stories can benefit an autistic child is important with studies showing good results when social skills stories are implemented many parents USE these intervention strategies with positive effect.

 

To learn more about social stories for a child on the spectrum visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Other appropriate social stories for a child on the spectrum can be found at: http://www.insideautisticminds.com

 

Social stories for students with autism

For many students with autism probably the biggest issue both at school and home is a deficit of social and communication skills.


For many teachers teaching social and communication skills to their autistic student can become their primary focus. With successes in teaching social skills comes greater confidence, which in turn leads to positive results in other areas of the classroom for the autistic student.


Research shows that social skills stories increase the autistic students knowledge of social and communication skills, which they struggle with like for example, asking questions, making friends, how to cope with recess, assembly and so on.


The social story provides the student with ASD information, the social cues and the perspective of others this is an area of weakness for the student with ASD.

 

Developed twenty years ago to aid communication skills, social stories are probable today one of the major tools teaching social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Social stories for students with autism should be visual. Most children on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures, making this strategy beneficial.

 

By using visual images a social story acts like a role model or visual plan of the situation, skill or activity the student with ASD is struggling with. Answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what the social story also provides the “how” and gives an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others all helping to reduce anxieties and confusion.

 

Printable and editable social stories for students with autism can be downloaded from

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Using social stories with autistic child

For children with an autism spectrum social interaction are difficult.  This is because children with an autism spectrum lack the theory of mind, which means they have marked difficulties with three main areas of development: social, communication both verbal and non-verbal and imagination skills

 

A common strategy used to help children with an autism spectrum deal with a lack of the theory of mind is social skills stories.


What are social stories?


Social stories are used to explain much like a comic script story a skill or behaviour the child on the spectrum is struggling with.

 

Developed by Carol Gray round twenty years ago to help with communication difficulties, social stories are now one of the major tools used to aid autistic children with social and communication skills.

 

Social skills stories have many uses not just learning how to interact in social situations. Social skills stories are also used to help with new routines, events, transitions, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger and frustration.

 

Research does show that social stories are a good method for improving the social behaviours of autistic children.

 

Many children with an autism spectrum have problems with communication, for example: answering questions, holding a conversation, listening etc.

 

A social skills story is written to help a child on the spectrum address a particular problem. However the social skills story can be used generally to address other issues as well. For example a social skills story for washing your hands can be used in the home as well as at school; not calling out is good in the classroom as well as other areas of school like assembly, with a bit of tweaking the social skills story is adaptable.

 

Probably one of the hardest social deficits for the peers or family of an autistic child is social indifference, where the autistic child appears not to care for the feelings of others, social stories are an excellent way of addressing this issue.

Good social stories will provide information about the feelings of others and the consequences of ignoring those feelings.

Social awkwardness is often the result of simply not understanding the expectations that a certain social situation includes. Providing information about those expectations helps address that deficit.

Social stories are written in first person text, for example “Today I am going to dentist” Social skills stories use images to show the skill like a role model or visual plan, in a manner the child with autism will understand.

However no two children are ever the same and most social stories will need slight tweaking to incorporate personal details, language etc.

 

To learn more about using social stories with an autistic child and how social skills stories are implemented visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories need no formal training to use, can be printed for convenience, are editable normally include visual images or pictures and will follow a set formula of sentence type in a concise manner that a child with autism can understand.

 

Research shows using social stories with an autistic child is beneficial and can have a positive affect of social, communication, imagination and behaviours.

 

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


ASD and social skills stories

A social story is written to help a person with ASD address social skills deficits and pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.


Children on the spectrum do not naturally acquire social and communication skills and lack he ability to interact with others effectively, this is due to social skills deficits. Social skills need to be taught directly through deliberate treatments and intervention strategies.


Teaching children with ASD social skills using intervention strategies


Probably the most significant of the various intervention strategies are social skills stories. Social skills stories can be easily implemented and used to teach the social and communication skills and behaviours that the child with an ASD is struggling with.


Having social impairments is much like being dropped in a foreign country with no idea where or how to get home or communicate. Children on the spectrum will need intervention strategies to acquire functional and age-appropriate social skills, make friendships, and learn communication skills.


We know that the vast majority of children with ASD are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual intervention strategies are excellent.


Visual intervention strategies


Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies. Written in first person text and using visual images and pictures to describe the situation or skill in detail, a social skills story break the skill into appropriate social cues, following a set formula the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation for the person with an ASD to follow.


Social skills stories provide concrete information on what people in a given situation are doing, thinking or feeling. The social skills story is like a visual plan showing the steps or sequence of events, identifying the significant social cues and their meaning, answering the important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why


For a child with an ASD social stories should describe social situations, contexts, and the likely behaviours of others and provide an appropriate behavioural response cue that the child with an ASD can understand.


Therefore teaching children with an ASD social skills using intervention strategies LIKE social stories is beneficial.


For children with an ASD social skills stories act as a VISUAL PLAN OR FRAMEWORK that helps children with autism understand skills and behaviours that they struggle with.


To learn more about children with ASD and social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Teenage years with autism

For the vast majority of us the teenage years are probably our most social years.

However for teenagers with an ASD this time can be incredibly confusing; moving from childhood, going through puberty, becoming sexually aware and ending up in adulthood, this rapidly moving social time can cause stress and anxieties.

Some teens with autism can become aware of how different they are from their peers, realise they don’t have many or any friends or a partner, or ideas for career choices.

For many teens with autism this will spur them on to learn appropriate social skills to “fit in”, for others it can mean isolation and in extreme circumstances even depression.

Deficits in social skills are the route cause of the majority of issues ASD teenagers encounter during this ever changing period of their lives.

For typically developing teenagers social skills are learnt naturally through watching, listening, intuition, gut feelings and good guess work! But for teenagers with an ASD these abilities are missing this is due to deficits in social skills.

Having a marked disability is social and communication skills can lead to social misunderstandings, for many parents, care givers and teachers this is a stressful and frustrating period in their teen’s life, being unable to communicate with your teen and watching them struggle socially is not easy.

However, there are excellent resources which can help the ASD teen address deficits in social skills; resources such as social skills stories are known to be beneficial around this time.

Developed primarily to aid communication difficulties social stories are a major tool used in autism to help teach and encourage appropriate social skills, address communication difficulties, prepare for changes to routines, transitions, teach age appropriate behaviours and social skills, teach about hygiene, puberty and other skills that they ASD teen is struggling with.

Social skills stories need no formal training to use; are editable which is a real bonus as no two ASD teenagers will ever be the same and we all use different expression and language.

Generally social stories are visual, individuals with autism are visual thinkers and learners; therefore autism resources which are visual are better understood and will have the greater impact for learning.

Using first person text and from the ASD teenagers point of view social skills stories for teens with autism are much like a role model, answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when, what as well as “how” plus giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

Social skills stories are easy to implement and can be used for a vast variety of skills, behaviours and situations, they are printable making them convenient and portable.

The teenage years with autism need not be to traumatic, using social stories as a strategy has proven effective for many teenagers with autism. To learn more about the teenage years with autism and how social skills stories for teens with autism can benefit your teenager visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autisticteen.html

Where you will find 65 social skills stories for teens with autism, on subjects like, puberty, hygiene, friendships, appropriate behaviours, social skills and many more.

Other sites offering social stories can be located at: 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Using social stories for autism

As typically developing beings we naturally learn social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours. This ability is missing in autism spectrum disorder and often referred to as the theory of mind or social skills deficits.

 

Probably the major factor for many parents raising an autistic child is their child’s social skills deficits. This is also true in the classroom with many teachers being insufficiently trained in teaching students with autism.

 

Teaching social and communication skills can often become a primary concern for many teachers and parents.

 

Success in addressing social skills deficits by teaching social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours can increase self-confidence and lead to positive results at home and in the classroom for students with autism.


Using social stories for autism is a VERY BENEFICIAL strategy which is used by the vast majority of parents raising an autistic child, care givers and teachers.


The most important aspect of a social skills story is that it provides the child on the autism spectrum with a role model.

The vast majority of children with autism spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore strategies which suit children with autism spectrum best ARE visual like social stories.


Social stories can be used for more than learning social, imagination and communication skills, they can be used FOR TRANSITIONS, new routines, changes in routines, activities, and how to respond appropriately to feelings like anger.

 

Using social stories for autism will help the child on the spectrum to better understand the thoughts, feelings and views of other people.


By implementing social stories for autism the child on the spectrum is more able to predict another person’s behaviour based on their actions.


Social stories present various situations and skills in a structured and clear manner in a way children with autism spectrum will find easier to understand. The social skills story should be written from the child’s perspective and follow a set formula of four sentence type: descriptive, perspective, direction and control.

Using social stories for autism will answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what, helping reduce confusion and anxieties, making unpredictable situations more routine.

 

By using visual images and first person text the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation, which children with autism spectrum find easy to use.


Editable, and printable the social skills story will suit all ages and abilities, parents can personalize the social skills story using their child’s name and language that is familiar to them. No two children with autism are ever the same and normally some tweaking of social stories is needed.


To learn more about how using social stories for autism can benefit your child or student with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Social stories have been used a s a strategy with autistic children for around twenty years giving positive results.

Other social stories for autistic children and teenagers can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

Using printable social stories for autism

Using printable social stories for autism as a visual plan or framework is a powerful tool for teaching children on the autism spectrum. Social skills stories are visual representation of situations, social skills, behaviours or events that happen in our lives.

 

Children with autism struggle with social, communication and imagination skills; this is often referred to as social skills deficits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism spectrum disorder, but will vary in degree depending on the ability of the ASD child.

 

However social skills deficits are always present, therefore strategies are needed to help teach ASD children methods of overcoming these deficits in social skills.

 

By using printable social stories for autism you can help teach an ASD child a particular social, communication or imagination skill or behaviour that they may find problematic or confusing.

 

For example many children on the autism spectrum struggle with hygiene skills, sharing, taking turns and making friends, using visual strategies like social stories can help much like a role model,  using visual images, pictures and text like a comic strip.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that take a concrete approach to learning which will help ASD children to understand what is being said, how they should react and how to recognize situations that occur that they may be struggling with.

 

By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. Social skills stories should follow a specific formula of sentence types, be editable and easy to personalize as no two children are ever the same and we all use different vocabulary.

 

To find out more about using printable social stories for autism on issues such as hygiene visit:

http://www.autismsocialsories.com/hygiene

 

Other social skills stories for autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties

Children with autistic spectrum disorder will have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age or ability; this is thought to be due to the “triad of impairments” which are common to autism.

 

What is the triad of impairments?

 

Are social skills deficits in three main areas, social skills, communication skills and imagination skills; all children with autistic spectrum disorder will have varying degrees of social skills deficits.

 

Methods of addressing autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties in communication skills.

 

All children with an autistic spectrum disorder experience communication difficulties. Although language itself may not be affected the way the child expresses themselves and uses language will almost certainly be affected. As will the way the child uses non-verbal language such as gestures and signals.

 

For many children with an autistic spectrum disorder understanding language is problematic and is one of the major causes of autistic behavioural difficulties.

 

Imagine being dropped in a foreign land with no means of communication, where everybody talked in a way you could not totally understand, this is what it can be like to be autistic and have communication difficulties.

 

What we do know for certain is that the vast majority of autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think and digest information easier if the information is visual.

 

Therefore, visual strategies which can enable autistic children to understand what is happening around them, what is expected of them or that they can use to express themselves should always be visual.

 

With autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties the most common visual strategies used are social skills stories, PECS, flash cards and other visual strategies such as visual timetables, choices boards and mini schedules etc.

 

Developed twenty years ago social skills stories ARE a major tool for autism that can be implemented and used to address many social skills deficits.

 

Social stories are a major tool for autism which needs no formal training to use, can be edited and personalized.

 

A social skills story is a simple description using first person text and visual images or pictures of an everyday social situation, activity or event shown visually from the child’s perspective, much like a visual plan or framework and acting as a role model to the autistic child.

 

For example, a social skills story can be used to help an autistic child prepare for upcoming changes to routines, or learn appropriate social interactions for situations that they encounter.

 

The goal of the social skills story is to give the autistic child a chance to rehearse the skill, change to routine or behaviour making them feel more relaxed and less anxious. Then, when the situation actually happens, the autistic child can use the story to help guide his or her behaviour.

 

Research shows that using social stories can have a positive affect on autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties, giving simple and clear descriptions of social cues and appropriate behaviours.

 

Generally social skills stories should follow a set pattern of sentence type. All social skills stories should be flexible and be editable, as we all use different language and expressions.

 

To learn more about how social stories can help address autistic spectrum disorder behavioural difficulties visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com