Archive for October, 2010

Social stories for ASD

Thursday, October 21st, 2010

Social stories can be used effectively as visual strategies for helping individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Developed around twenty years ago to help communication difficulties in ASD children, social stories are now a major autistic resource used to teach and encourage social and communication skills in ASD children and adults

The social skills story follows a set formula of four sentence types. 

Social stories for ASD are used in situations and skills the ASD individual finds difficult to cope with, they can be edited and adapted easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the ASD individual.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on.

Teachers can use social stories for ASD in the classroom, on the playground, out and about and for other tasks like personal hygiene etc

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are “visual thinkers and learners” meaning they think in images and pictures, therefore they are more able to absorb information and instruction when the information is visual rather than written text or auditory.

Social stories are visual strategies which describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses.

The social skills story is used to help with communication difficulties, changes to routines, explain rules and show how other people may be feeling by explaining another’s point of view. The social skills story will also show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social stories for ASD for your child with ASD can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Communication difficulties in child with autism

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Common to individuals with autism are social skills deficits. Having social skills deficits can make communication difficult for a child with autism.

As typical beings we communicate both verbally and non-verbally daily. Communication is a major skill, we naturally learn. For individuals with autism however the ability to communicate is affected, having ASD can make an individual react and interact in a very different manner to typically developing beings.

For a child with an ASD expressing their needs or wants, can quite often be misunderstood. For example: In the classroom; A child with autism may not typically ask for a drink when they are thirsty, they may for example snatch the drink from another person, simply take the drink without asking or maybe they will shout out etc., this is typical to autism.

 

Normally all adverse autistic behaviour will happen for a reason an internal or external factor, not simply out of mischief or the desire to be awkward or naughty.

Research shows us autistic children are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching or caring for a child with autism it is usually best to use visual tools and supports when you are trying to get information across or tackle an adverse autistic behaviour. 

 

Research shows a child with autism will be less confused when the information presented to them is visual.

Understandably many teachers especially those teaching in mainstream education are little prepared to teach a child with autism. The English language is predominantly verbal, and this is the main focus in mainstream education. However with an autistic student this method of teaching is not always going to be affective.

With a poor attention span and communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication the autistic student may struggle with lessons which are primarily verbal or written.

A lack social skills and communication difficulties can make it problematic for autistic children to make and maintain friendships, and generally “fit in” socially.

Using visual support tools for autism such as social stories; WILL help to improve communication difficulties in a child with autism.

Using visual supports tools for autism within the classroom and at home can help the child with an ASD focus on the skill or situation that they are struggling with. A social skills story can show the child with an ASD a visual step by step plan or framework of what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) helping the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, the social story has now evolved into a significant tool used by parents and teachers to help them improve communication difficulties and social skills in their child with autism.

To find out more about social stories and how they help improve communication difficulties in a child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other sites offering social stories to improve social and communication skills for the autistic student can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Visual supports in autism

Tuesday, October 19th, 2010

Individuals with autism are often described as “visual learners” or “visual thinkers.” Which means they think in pictures, consequently autism resources need to be visual.

Research suggests greater success when parents and teachers use visual supports rather than oral or written supports and resources.

Such visual supports in autism resources as social skills stories, flash cards, visual schedules, PECS system etc. 

There are many aspects of an autistic child’s environment and everyday activities which will benefit from visual supports for autism.

Using social skills stories – Social stories are word and picture-based stories, much like a comic strip conversation, written to help the child with autism understand and feel more comfortable with skills, activities, communication and social situations.

Social stories are normally written in a specific manner, from the autistic child’s point of view and always using first person text and visual images. By answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into how other people may feel or think.

Using visual schedules – Visual schedules are a set of pictures that communicate a series of activities or the steps of a specific activity. A visual schedule can help the child with autism understand and manage their daily activities, which reduces stress and anxiety.

Using visual supports in autism such as flash cards – A common problem for children with autism spectrum disorder is their ability to communicate. Flash cards are a strategy which can help to increase vocabulary, promote language development, and strengthen communication skills when teaching.

All of these strategies are useful for individuals with autism and related conditions.

To learn more about how social skills stories can benefit your child with an ASD and gain immediate downloads of social stories for autistic children visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Where you will find a selection of social skills stories for autistic children and young people

To learn more about visual supports in autism such as flash cards and visual schedules visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual.html

Where you will find a selection of flash cards available for visual schedules and as communication aids for ASD children

 

Other visual supports in autism can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

Monday, October 18th, 2010

What are Social Skills Stories?

Social skills stories are designed and written following a set pattern of sentence types and visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate social cues.

A social skills story should describe what happens in a specific social situation in a structured and consistent manner.

Generally autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Consequently, an appropriate social skills story should be visual, the vast majority of autistic individuals respond better to visual information and instruction.

Social skills stories are visual strategies using images and appropriate first person text. Each social skills story should be written from the ASD individual’s point of view.

The social story answers the “wh” questions (who, why, where. when and what) as well as giving an insight into the emotions and thoughts of others. The social story acts like a role model showing autistic individuals visually how to behave in a socially acceptable way.

Using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills

The goal of any social skills story should be:

  • To provide ASD individual’s with social cues for situations or skills.
  • To help the autistic person rehearse a situation, and to respond appropriately
  • To help prepare the autistic person for routine changes or new experiences.
  • To reduce negative behaviour.
  • To help reduce social blunders caused through lack of social understanding.
  • To help address any communication difficulties

Therefore using social skills stories as a strategy for teaching social and communication skills is beneficial.

Social skills stories are visual strategies that address communication difficulties and provide a visual framework or plan which reduces stress and anxiety as well as giving the ASD individual a chance to rehearse appropriate responses.

Social skills stories work because

They address the “theory of mind”. Many individuals with autism do not act appropriately in social situations, simply because they do not understand that others might have a different opinion to them.

Many individuals with autism fail to understand verbal and nonverbal communications such as wit and humour, or that others may have different opinions, wants and needs to them.

Consequently communication difficulties are common for an ASD individual and social situations can become unpredictable and confusing.

Social skills stories help people with autism read situations and skills better and therefore react and act appropriately.

To learn more about what are social skills stories? And how people with autism can benefit from using these visual strategies to help them address communication difficulties as well as social skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social story on hygiene and Autism

Sunday, October 17th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential everyday life skill.

 

However for a person with autism spectrum disorder even the simplest of hygiene tasks such as tooth brushing can cause anxiety and distress. For a person with autism spectrum disorder social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common.

 

Generally people with autism have sensory processing issues; are either hyper or hypo sensitive to stimuli – sight, sound, touch, taste or smell. Making a task such as tooth brushing problematic; the cold water, taste of the tooth paste even the nylon bristle of the tooth brush can be distressing.

 

Also a lack of social skills deficits affects how the autistic individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to sensory stimuli and those around them. So for example looking a hygiene and autism, it is not uncommon for an autistic individual to simply not understand the need for hygiene and self care.

 

Generally people with autism live in a ‘literal world’ meaning they fail to see the social rules or etiquette, they will speak literally and really not care much what others may be thinking or feeling, this is not arrogance merely a symptom of autism.

 

Generally, people with autism spectrum disorder lack social and communication skills and need direct teaching. Most autistic people are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures.

 

Therefore visual strategies like social stories work very well for teaching and encouraging social skills the person with ASD is struggling to master or understand.

 

Consequently, using a social story on hygiene and Autism is beneficial. The social story will help the person with ASD understand the basic need for hygiene and how this is accomplished.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and reactions of others, helping to reduce stress and anxieties.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism can tackle teaching the need for hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, visiting the dentist, showering, puberty and so on.

 

Using visual strategies has been shown to work; social stories use first person text and visual images much like a comic strip, as a visual plan or framework of the skill or behavior being tackled, in a manner the ASD individual will understand.

 

Social stories for autism should be editable, printable and easy to implement, need no formal training to use and easy to personalize for each ASD individual.

 

A social story on hygiene and Autism will help explain visually the need for hygiene, why and how.

 

To learn more about visual strategies like social stories for autism and hygiene visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For other social stories for autism and hygiene as well as other issues visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Encourage good hygiene in autism

Friday, October 15th, 2010

Learning self-help skills such as good eating habits, dressing, toileting, and personal hygiene can be challenging for young people with autism spectrum disorder.


Social skills stories can be used effectively to help explain good hygiene habits and routines in autism. Social skills stories are developed to help individuals with autism understand how others perceive their appearance and the social implications of neglecting personal hygiene.


By using visual images and first person text in a step-by-step framework or plan the social story can explain exactly what individuals with autism need to remember to ensure good hygiene.

 

Teaching personal hygiene to young people with autism spectrum disorder can be problematic due to social skills deficits. Individuals with ASD may not understand the need to develop good hygiene habits.

 

Social skills deficits are common to autism and affect the way an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts to situations , skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted or as “normal”


Social stories encourage good hygiene in autism by answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts feelings and emotions of others.


Individuals with ASD are generally visual thinkers and learners therefore visual strategies such as social stories are beneficial. The social story should be editable, easy to personalize and print and be convenient to use.


Personal hygiene skills such as tooth brushing, showering and menstruation can be addressed using appropriate social stories for autism hygiene habits.


To learn more about how social stories for autism hygiene habits can be implemented to help ASD individuals with personal hygiene skills and routines visit sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Social stories short pieces of text, visual strategies which show ASD individuals how to cope with situations, skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand or deal with.


Social stories for autism hygiene habits can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


Other social stories can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Sensory Issues with Autism

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Sensory sensitivity can lead to behavioural problems, difficulties with coordination, and many other issues for children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

A child with autism spectrum disorder will have marked difficulties managing sensory input, they may over-react to taste, touch, feel, light or noise.

Sometimes children with autism spectrum disorder use repetitive stereotypical movements and autistic behaviours such as stimming.  Many may feel the need to flick their fingers, bang their heads, even slam against furniture or twirl in circles, these autistic behaviours are due to sensory sensitivity, with the child with autism spectrum disorder being either hyper or hypo sensitive.

There is no outright cure for sensory sensitivity, but there are ways to help your child manage some of these difficulties.

Gather information about sensory sensitivity and how you can help your child with autism, for example: Children with hyperactive sensory systems will typically avoid activities that involve movement, while children that have hypoactive sensory systems will seek out activities that involve movement.

Therefore a child on the spectrum that with hyperactive sensory systems may hide under their covers, or bury their head into cushions, while a child on the spectrum with a hypoactive sensory systems may use stimming or repetitive stereotypical movements such as rocking or twirling.

Some children with autism may feel the need to continually flush the toilet, eat only one type of food, or continuously repeat themselves; these kinds of sensory difficulties can be eased using social skills stories.

Social skills stories are short descriptive pieces of text used to help the child with autism understand a behaviour or skill that they may be struggling with. Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures.

Using this concept, social skills stories for autism are visual, using images and or pictures to describe the activity, behaviour or skill in a manner the child on the spectrum can understand.

Acting as a visual plan, framework of role made the social skills story answers the ever important “wh” questions, who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.

Social skills stories for autism must be editable as no two children on the spectrum are ever the same and their abilities and needs will differ as with any child. Social skills stories need to be convenient to use therefore they should be printable, colourful and easy to personalize.

To find out more about how social skills stories for autism can be used to help with certain sensory difficulties in autistic children visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

Other general everyday and school, social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialtories.com/preschool

 

 

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Social skills story on hygiene and autism

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Social skills stories are visual strategies that ARE used to help teach social skills to people with autism. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories follow a set formula of sentence type.

 

Generally written in the first person and from the point of view of the autistic person social stories address social skills deficits and teach social and communication skills. A social skills story should be visually rich, the social skills story will describe the skill or behavior the autistic child may be struggling to understand in an easy to follow step by step plan or framework with visual images.

 

Generally children with autism have social difficulties and fail to understand social and communication skills. Skills and behaviors which the rest of us take for granted; for example hygiene skills such as eating habits, washing their teeth, getting a hair cut and so on.

 

Consequently, a lot of parents of autistic children, care givers and educators implement social skills stories to help the autistic child comprehend and master the skill or behavior they are struggling with, easing anxieties and stress.

 

The vast majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Social stories are excellent visual strategies, providing the answer to the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.

 

The social skills story can act like a role model for the ASD child.

 

By breaking the skill down into smaller easier to understand sections the social skills story will explain the skill in a manner the ASD child can understand.

 

Skills such as hygiene can cause an ASD child difficulties, many autistic children can be distressed by for example the sound the toilet makes, the taste of the toothpaste, visiting a dentist even getting a haircut can be stressful.

 

A social story on hygiene and autism, which can teach the appropriate hygiene skills, can ease stresses and anxieties.

 

To understand more about social skills stories for autism and how easy they can be implemented and used visit any of the following sites. Or for a specific social story on hygiene and autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

For all other social skills stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Halloween and autism

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Halloween is probably one of the best holidays for most children. They can dress up as their favourite spooky character or superhero, and parade around the streets. On Halloween kids are allowed to go to strangers houses and ask for candy, the very thing kids are told not to do every other day of the year.


However for a lot of kids with autism, Halloween can be a stressful and confusing time.

 

Most kids with autism have social skills deficits. Social skills deficits are nearly always present in autistic children, having social skills deficits affects the way a person processes information, thinks, act, re-acts and behaves.


Due to their social limitations children on the spectrum will quite often fail to understand the concept of Halloween or make-believe. A lot of children on the spectrum will also have sensor processing issues: sight, sound, feel, touch and taste, which can mean getting your child with ASD to wear a costume, can be difficult, rough fabric and constricting accessories or masks is a recipe for disaster.


Getting an child with ASD to approach a strangers home, much less to greet them with any sort of social appropriateness, plus asking your child to hand over the candy he has just earned because he has diet limitations is sure to cause problems.


Social skills stories can help overcome many of the issues you may have surrounding this holiday.


Plan ahead work out a route, a leaving and returning time, scout around the area beforehand to check out for flashing lights and other sensory nightmares for your child on the spectrum and avoid these houses.


Practise the “Trick or Treat” question and accepting candy, use social stories for autism and Halloween to help with this.


Social stories are short visual strategies that are used to help children with autism deal with and cope with situations or skills they would otherwise struggle to understand, such as Halloween. A social skills story allows children with autism to rehearse a social situation, making it more routine, thus reducing anxieties and stress.


Using visual strategies such as social skills stories is recommended in autism as most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures.

Halloween and autism need not be a nightmare if you plan ahead, download social stories for autism and Halloween. Mark Halloween off on your calendar so your ASD child can see when it is going to happen, plan the costume, or maybe your ASD child would rather just a hat?


For more information on Halloween and autism and to download suitable social skills stories, which can be printed off and edited to make them personal to your ASD child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween


For all other stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Social skills stories for students with autism

Monday, October 4th, 2010

A social skills story is an intervention strategy used to teach social skills to individuals with autism.

 

Social skills stories were developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray, originally as a means of communication with the autistic students she was working with. Since then social skills stories have grown in popularity and use.

 

Today social skills stories are probably one of the most significant autism tools used to help individuals with autism cope and learn appropriate social, communication and behaviour skills.

 

Unlike typically developing children autistic kids do not develop social and communication skills in the typical manner, they prefer routines and need structure, finding changes difficult, stressful and confusing.

 

Generally autistic kids ARE visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in pictures. Therefore the best learning method for the vast majority of students with autism is visual.

 

Using visual strategies like social skills stories is a popular answer with many teachers of students with autism.

 

A social skills story provides concrete information to help improve students’ social skills and appropriate behaviours. Normally social stories will follow a set pattern or formula of specific sentence type.

 

No two autistic students will ever be the same therefore social stories need to be editable to suit the needs and terminology used by individual autistic students.

 

A social skills story is an easy and effective way to teach students with autism how to negotiate changes to routines, handle problem situations and surprises. The social skills story will also help with situations such as transition, recess, making friends, asking questions, eating habits and personal hygiene.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism should be written from the autistic student’s point of view and use visual images to depict the situation or skill the student with ASD is struggling with.

 

Social stories should answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others. The social story should break the skill or situation down into small easier to understand sections, the important social cues and use no frill or extra language to complicate or detract from the skill or situation being dealt with in the social story.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism are visual strategies and should be printable for ease of use and convenience.

 

This visual strategy should also be easy to personalize and act as a role model or visual framework for the student with ASD.

 

To learn more about how social skills stories can help your ASD student visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Where you will find social skills stories for students with autism in key stage one, key stage two and also for preschool autism.

 

All these social stories are printable, editable and can be personalized for any student with ASD.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

How to manage Christmas and autism spectrum disorder

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

Christmas can be an exciting and fun time, but it can also be stressful.


Many children with autism can become confused and stressed at this time, with all the sensory happenings and disruptions to routines and sameness.


The sheer chaos that ensues from changes in routine added to the growing anticipation can often be a recipe for melt downs.

 

However there are strategies parents and teachers can put in place that help the autistic child visualise the Christmas holiday period and make this otherwise chaotic and unpredictable time more routine.

 

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual strategies work best.

 

Parents can use a normal calendar for marking off dates such as the date the tree will go up, the date you will send cards, bake the cake and so on, so the ASD child can visually see the date and will know what to expect.

 

Social stories for autism and Christmas are beneficial visual strategies, they can help explain an otherwise confusing activity, skill or situation thus reducing anxieties and making things routine again.

 

Parents have found many benefits to be had in implementing social skills stories for autism and Christmas, stories can deal with putting up the tree, saying thank you, visiting relatives and so on.

 

Social skills stories are short visual strategies used to help explain to a child with autism what is happening and why. The social story answers the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.

 

To learn more about how to manage Christmas and autism spectrum disorder visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

 

For many parents Christmas will be a stressful time, but implementing social stories can help you to manage Christmas and autism spectrum disorder.

How to prepare children with autism for Halloween

Saturday, October 2nd, 2010

Halloween, for a typically developing child can be a tremendous amount of fun. However for a child with autism Halloween can be overwhelming, confusing and stressful, with all the sensory happenings connected to this holiday.

 

For example, there is the costume, this may feel itchy or scratchy on their skin, the spooky lights that some houses may display, the ringing doorbells, the noises of other children shouting and shrieking and candy many autistic children are on a special diet and may not be allowed to eat candy.

 

On the other hand Halloween can also present some autistic children with the chance to dress up as their favourite character and meet with the approval of neighbours and friends. Generally Halloween is repetitive, which is ideal for children on the spectrum who prefer routines and repetitiveness.

 

Trick or treating at Halloween does require some social interaction, however this social interaction is repetitive; walking from house to house, knocking the door and saying trick or treat.

 

When deciding on how to prepare children with autism for Halloween, it is a good idea to plan a route with your child beforehand that you will stick to. Choose a time to leave the house, plan a path, and know what will happen when you come home will your child be allowed to eat the candy?  What can they he eat? If the candy is not a good choice, what substitute treat will he get etc.

 

Try to keep things simple, prepare your child for the “Trick or Treat” question by practising it with your child. Social stories are a good autism resource for this.

 

When preparing children with autism for Halloween social skills stories can be beneficial, as a social skills story will show, as well as tell the ASD child exactly what to expect and what others will expect from them.

 

It is advisable to read the social story together, as often as possible. Ask your child questions like “what if no one is home, or they don’t answer the door” This will also help your ASD child understand that it’s ok to skip a house.

 

Social skills stories can help your ASD child understand and remember the “Trick or Treat” question and that it is polite to take a piece of candy from a basket and say thank you, and that you will sort the treat bag your child has once you get back home, and so on.

 

It is also a good idea to be prepared before you actually leave the house for example scout round the neighbourhood before hand on your own looking for decorations that might upset your ASD child. For example does any house have flashing lights that could trigger a sensory reaction, if so skip that house, or visit ahead of time to avoid melt-downs.

 

Halloween social skills stories are easy to locate and implement, they can help with a majority of situations and skills that are needed during this time, from the trick or treat question, to preparing the pumpkin, saying thank you and so on.

 

Halloween social skills stories on how to prepare children with autism for Halloween can be quickly accessed and downloaded from

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/halloween

Other social skills stories are also available from http://www.autismsocialstoris.com

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today