Archive for September, 2010

Social stories for kids with autism

Wednesday, September 22nd, 2010

Social stories are stories specifically written for kids with autism to help them deal with specific issues.  They are ideal for kids with autism because they can be read again and again, autistic kids prefer repetition.


The social skills story provides the autistic child with accurate information in an easy to understand manner.


The skill or situation is broken down in to key points; the important social cues, and answers the key “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the  reactions the autistic child might expect to occur in the situation, the actions and reactions that might be expected of him, and why.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can be used for many situations and skills the child is struggling with; for example: answering questions, making friends, respecting personal space, even situations such as visiting Grandparents and the dentist, infact anything!

 

The objective being to increase the child’s understanding of, make him more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation they are having problems with.

 

Social stories for kids with autism can act like a visual planner, because they are visually rich with images or pictures they are easy to follow. Social skills stories are always written in first person text and from the ASD child’s point of view.

 

East to edit and personalize social skills stories are convenient and can be used in all situations including school and at home. Parents are able to edit the stories and add language that the ASD child’s familiar with.

 

The social skills story is printable therefore it can be easily transported. Acting like a role model a social skills story can answer tricky questions around puberty, on special occasions, about hygiene issues and so on.

 

Research suggests kids with autism respond extremely well to social skills stories.

 

For more info on how to use social skills stories and to gain access to downloads of these autistic resources visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Or for more other autistic resources http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties

Friday, September 17th, 2010

Recent studies show that social stories can help reduce problem behaviours in children with autism. As well as increase social awareness and teach new skills.

In some cases the new behaviours were maintained even after the social skills story was faded out. Generally Social stories work best for children who have basic language skills.

Social Stories are visual strategies which can be implemented to help teach social skills to children with autism and related disabilities.

Autistic behaviour difficulties can be addressed using social stories, the social story will provide the ASD child with accurate information about a situation or skill that they may find difficult or confusing.

The situation or skill is described in detail using visual images and first person text giving focus to the key points: the important social cues.

By answering the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and emotions as well as reactions of those around them.

The main objective of the social skills story is to increase the understanding of the ASD child making him/her more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation in question.

Therefore social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties are beneficial in helping teach appropriate behaviours. To learn more about social skills stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Where you will find important information on social stories for children with autism that have behavioural difficulties, as well as social stories for various skills and situations your ASD child may be struggling to cope with or understand like for example: Making friends, asking questions, tooth brushing, shopping and so on…

These visual strategies are easy to download, edit and personalize and can be printed for convenience. All written in first person language and from the child’s own point of view, visual and in an easy to understand manner, these social skills stories can act as a role model in various situations.

Other sites offering info and downloads include http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Autistic behaviour issues using social stories

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Children with an autistic spectrum disorder can have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age and ability.

 

The autism spectrum is an umbrella for a range of autistic disorders from low functioning autism to High functioning autism and Asperger disorder.

 

Although combined by autistic characteristics the abilities of each individual will vary depending on where a child falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Many of the symptoms associated with autistic spectrum disorder can lead to behavioural difficulties.

 

Typically children with an autistic spectrum disorder will have difficulties socialising and communicating with others. For example typical autistic characteristics can include: displaying symptoms of withdrawal, the use of odd or inappropriate language, have unusual preoccupations, use repetitive stereotypical movements, have unusual routines, habits and behaviours.

 

Research suggests parents, teachers and other professionals use social skills stories to improve the social functioning and behaviour of children with autism.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that describe skills and situations in terms of social cues and appropriate responses.

 

Social skills stories can be individualized to suit the needs and abilities of the individual on the spectrum. The social skills story can be used to help children with autism learn appropriate social and communication skills.

 

The goal of the social skills story for children with autism should be to help pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.

 

To learn more about how to help autistic behaviour issues using social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com.behavior

 

These social stories are visual strategies written in first person language from the point of view of the autistic individual and will help solve to solve autistic behaviour issues using social stories as the answer.

Other appropriate social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

social stories teaching tools

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

Social stories teaching tools are a resource used to teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum.

 

Social skills difficulties are a common characteristic of autism, and are generally treated with various autism tools.

 

Generally individuals on the autism spectrum are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore autism tools should be visual.

 

Social stories teaching tools are visual they were first developed by Carol Gray almost twenty years ago as a means of communicating with the autistic children she was working with.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that act like a role model for  autistic children. Using first person language and images the social skills story answers the important “wh” questions who, where, why, when and what as well as giving possible reactions and solutions the autistic child may consider, helping to make them more comfortable with and in the situation they may be struggling with.

The social skills story will show the autistic child how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view. It will also explain rules, routines, situations, upcoming events or abstract concepts; and how the child with autism can understand expectations.

Social stories teaching tools are visual strategies which can teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum, are easy to implement can be edited and personalized as well as printed for convenience.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com for more information on social skills stories and other autism tools used as visual strategies to teach social and communication skills to individuals on the autism spectrum.

Or  http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder

Friday, September 10th, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social skills through the use o visual images and first person text. Social skills stories work by describing visually in a concise manner any situation or skill that the child with ASD is finding difficult to master or understand.

Social stories teach social skills.

A social skills story is introduced to help a child with ASD understand everyday situations from the child’s own perspective.

For example a social skills story can help the ASD child prepare for changes to routine, cope with recess, assembly, visiting the dentist, going shopping and so on.

The goal or main idea behind using social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder is to help the ASD child feel more confident with the situation or skill, giving the a chance to become familiar with the situation before hand a rehearsal of what to expect and how to deal with it.

Each social skills story uses a set pattern of sentence type: Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and Control sentence in a predefined formula first developed twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

Nowadays social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder are not purely used as a means of communication; they are used as a role model for skills, behaviours and situations that an autistic child may find confusing and troublesome.

Social stories can be used in schools, college, work, home and while out and about. Social stories are normally always visual children with autistic spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Therefore social stories teaching a skill or behaviour should be visual the ASD child will find the information in the social skills story easier to understand when it is visual.

Social stories to teach social skills should use first person language are consistent and easy to implement. Parents and teachers need no formal training to use social stories.

To find out more about social stories and gain downloads of 100 social skills stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com Where you may gain access to editable, printable, expertly written stories.

Or 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Social skills training for autism

Friday, September 3rd, 2010

For the vast majority of autistic individuals the “everyday or normal” communication and social challenges they face can cause stress and anxieties.


Many children with autism experience difficulty with aspects of social interactions and communication. This is referred to as social skills deficits, this means the ASD child has impaired abilities in certain aspects for example they will struggle to relate to their peers and form or maintain friendships.


Methods such as social skills stories for autism can be used to overcome many of the hurdles autistic individuals face on an almost daily bases with social and communication difficulties.


A common difficulty shared by the majority of children with autism is to make inappropriate remarks (communication difficulties) or behave in socially unacceptable ways with little awareness of the social implications of these behaviours.


Social skills stories can help by not asking the ASD child to change inappropriate social behaviours. Instead, social skills stories work by visually showing the ASD child an alternative communication or socially acceptable skill or alternative social strategies.


Used as a means of communication and social skills training for autism, social skills stories are easy to implement and use, they need no formal training, can be printed, edited and personalized to suit individuals own specific needs.


Social skills stories are used as a role model for appropriate behaviours. Generally most autistic individuals will be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images and pictures. Therefore, using visual supports for autism is by far the best option. This visual strategy is implemented in social skills stories for autism, appropriate visual images are used with first person text as a visual plan of the skill, situation, task or communication difficulties the ASD child may be struggling with.


Research suggests visual supports for autism can be beneficial in social skills training for autism. By using a visual strategy children with autism can better understand skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted such as making friends, washing our teeth, respecting personal space, asking questions and so on.


To learn more about social skills stories for autism and how they may benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources