Archive for August, 2010

What is it like to be autistic?

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

There are very few physical signs of autism spectrum disorder. So what is it like to be autistic? Imagine being left in a foreign country alone, unable to speak the language, unable to read the signs or gestures of others. Your senses have become super sensitive, and you have nowhere to turn to for help.


This is how the world appears for many autistic children. Our ever changing and fast moving world can trigger anxiety attacks, confusion and stress for those with autism spectrum disorder.


Parents of autistic children report anxieties. Although autism is being diagnosed more frequently with 1:4 being diagnosed autistic, still there is not a lot of information on autism. Parents of autistic children report difficulties such as having to get used to people thinking you are a bad parent that cannot control their child. Parents of kids with autism also report problems from doctors calling them an over-anxious parent, family members dismissing their child as a spoilt brat. Parents of kids with autism also find difficulties with friends, being shunned and not included in events because of their autistic child’s behaviours.


Having a child diagnosed autistic is not going to be easy, experts agree early intervention is beneficial.

 

Parents of kids with autism also agree that visual supports are a good idea, such as visual support cards, schedules, social stories and PECS communication systems.


All designed to help children with autism cope in an ever changing and confusing world. Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in images or pictures and will gain more help from visual strategies rather than spoken or text.

 

Implementing visual strategies can benefit children with autism greatly. For example many children with an ASD struggle with simple tasks such as tooth brushing, introducing social stories can help with this.


Social stories are short specific visual strategies, pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skills in terms of the relevant social cues. Using first person language with no frills, following a specific pattern social stories are visual strategies that are used to teach and re-enforce social and communication skills as well as give clear coping strategies for sensory processing issues and behaviour difficulties.


Much like a visual plan or role model a social skills story can answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of those around them.


So for example a social skills story for tooth brushing can teach children with an ASD why it is important to brush your teeth, how to brush your teeth and what the consequence of not brushing your teeth might be.


Teachers and parents with ASD children do not need any formal training to use social skills stories, they can be printed, personalized and edited to make them easy to implement and convenient.

 

ASD children respond well to visual strategies such as social skills stories, visual support cards, schedules and PECS.


For more information on visual supports such as social stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or for more information on visual support cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Understanding autism spectrum disorders

Sunday, August 22nd, 2010

Parents, teachers, caregivers and other professionals involved in the care and well being of an individual on the spectrum can find understanding autism spectrum disorders confusing and stressful.


All children with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will have the triad of autistic impairments in their ability to:


Socially interact

Communication difficulties

Imagination skills


Plus in most cases sensory processing issues which can affect an autistic individuals senses (taste, smell, touch, sound and sight). Most children with an ASD will also display obsessive and repetitive behaviours, will prefer routines and can become anxious if these routines change.


Children with an ASD also display marked difficulties with non-verbal and verbal communication. A child with autism will have difficulties understanding the communication and language used by those around them as well difficulties in developing effective communication themselves.


Unlike typically developing children that learn social skills naturally, a child with autism will struggle socially. For many parents probably the hardest challenge they face is their child’s difficulty to understand the social behaviour of others. A child with autism will have difficulties displaying and understanding appropriate socially accepted behaviours.

 

Generally most autistic individuals do not process information in the same manner as typically developing beings.  The opinions and thoughts of other are of no real consequence for the individual on the spectrum, which can cause frustrations and upset.

Consequently, understanding autism spectrum disorders can be frustrating and stressful for those involved in the everyday care of an individual on the spectrum.


Research shows us however that although there is no cure for autism there are various treatments of autism that are available that can help overcome triad of autistic impairments.

 

Various treatments of autism like social skills stories work effectively addressing the triad of autistic impairments. They do this by showing the autistic child what to expect in certain situations or what is expected of them which reduces stress and helps control anxieties.


By answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others a social skills stories visually explain using images and relevant social cues the skill or situation. All helping an autistic child to better understand and cope with the skill or situation that

They may be struggling with. 


To find a greater understanding of autism spectrum disorders and how social skills stories can help address some of the issues faced by children with an ASD visit sites like:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Strategies to teach children with autism

Friday, August 20th, 2010

A child with an ASD will not intentionally cause stress or upset anybodies feelings. A child with an ASD will not misbehave or harm simply out of fun or mischief.


Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.


The common characteristics of autism will often make a child with autism appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.


These are not bad characteristics, just difficult to understand. However for parents with autistic children these common characteristics of autism can make life extremely difficult and at times stressful.


Strategies to teach children with autism social and communication skills and behaviours are useful, research does suggest parents report significant improvements in social behaviours.


Having the ability to socially interact and communicate both verbally and nonverbally is a naturally learnt ability in typically developing beings. These skills however are missing in autistic children and need to be taught directly.


Using strategies to teach children with autism such as social stories does show vast improvements in social and communication skills. Social stories are short descriptive stories like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.


Using visual images which most autistic people find easier to understand and first person text the social story breaks the skill down into relevant social cues and shows the individual with autism spectrum disorder what to expect and what others will expect from them.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how using strategies to teach children with autism like social stories will help your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories for children with autism

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

Social Stories are a visual tool used to help teach social skills to children with autism.


Social stories provide the individual with autism an explanation and visual framework of the skill or situation that they may find difficult or confusing.


Research shows that the Social Stories are an excellent visual tool which can be used to help reduce stress and inappropriate behaviours in some children with an ASD. The social story also increases social understanding and has been reported as a good approach for helping children with an ASD to reach their full potential.


The goal of a social skills story is to increase the autistic child’s understanding of skills and social situations they are struggling to master and understand. By making the child with an ASD more comfortable with and in the situation, and suggest possible responses they may receive from others.

 

Social skills stories follow specific sentence types: descriptive, perspective, directive and control. Introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, social stories have grown into a very popular visual strategy that can be used with all autistic individuals regardless of age and ability.

 

Generally social skills stories are written by experts, teachers and parents to help teach social and communication skills to autistic individuals. Social stories can be edited to suit all needs, personalized, printed and are portable making them convenient and easy to use.


A social skills story can be introduced to help deal with any situation or skill that the autistic child needs help with. No formal training is needed to use social skills stories, site which offer support and expertly written social stories can be found using search engines such as Google.

 

Sites that offer social stories for children with autism like http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer support and downloads of social skills stories for various situations and skills for a small fee.


A social skills story should be visual and use first person text, like a role model the social skills story will help with transitions, and changes to routines as well as teach and support social skills and communication difficulties.

 

For more information on this visual strategy visit any of the following sites and find social stories for children with autism

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Autistic supports

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Most autistic individuals struggle with the everyday common tasks and skills we undertake naturally without any pre-planning or thought in a lot of cases.

 

Due to their social skills deficits and in some cases sensory processing issues many autistic individuals have difficulties with communication, social interactions, imagination skills, as well as repetitive and obsessive behaviours.


Using autistic supports designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face is beneficial.


According to the latest autism treatment research autistic supports like visual support cues, social stories, PECS communication boards, flash cards and visual schedules all play a large pare in the overall development of social and communication skills as well as addressing sensory processing issues.


The latest autism treatment research suggests internet sites run by parents and professionals offering autistic support and other autistic resources can be of great comfort and help to many families struggling with an autistic child.


Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as google.

 

Having a child on the autism spectrum is not easy, many tasks and activities other families take for granted can be a real uphill struggle even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.


Help, is what most families need and readily available autistic supports which they can rely on daily to help them cope with and ease some of the daily stresses.


Help such as social stories, are readily available. What are social stories? The easiest way to describe a social story is just that “A social story” ¦Originally social stories were developed to help overcome communication difficulties.


But today social stories are one of the major autistic resources used to help teach and support individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits and deal with many of the sensory processing issues they face.

 

So what are social stories?. A social story describes the skill or situation in relevant social cues using visual images to show the skill in small easier to understand steps, a bit like a visual plan of the skills or situation describing it from the autistic person’s point of view in first person language.


A social story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as we as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping individuals with autism get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.


So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.


Site which offer immediate access to social stories for a minimal fee like http://www.autismsocialstories.com are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families of a child with autism and individuals with autism.


Other sites offering social stories can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Treatment goals autism

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Research into the latest on autism treatment, shows families and teachers support the uses of visual strategies as a means of teaching and supporting social and communication skills in children with autism.


The priority treatment goals autism are to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, achievable using autistic visual supports like social stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.


The predominant characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorders are impairments in an individual’s of social skills, communication difficulties and interaction, along with sensory processing issues, restricted and repetitive activities and interests. This is often referred to as social skills deficits or the theory of mind.


Research shows many parents worry about their child’s ability to make and maintain friendships which often proves difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder.


Probably the main treatment goals for autism are to help overcome social skills deficits – the theory of mind and ease family life and stresses, as well as to help the autistic individual to reach their full potential in quality of life and functional independence.


Achievable with the help of services and autistic visual supports and resources designed specifically to help overcome many of the deficits associated with this disorder. Such as social skills stories specifically designed to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues as well as communication difficulties.

 

Parents report significant improvements in social skills understanding once social skills stories have been implemented.

 

A social story follows a specific pattern of sentence type: descriptive, directive, perspective and control sentences. Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, since then their use has expanded and today they are classed as one of the major autistic resources for teaching and supporting social skills learning.


The latest on autism treatment shows a popular increase in the implementation of social stories to address social skills deficits. Social stories are written in first person text, use visual images or pictures and are short descriptive no fluff stories.

 

The goal of the social story is to help the autistic child better understand a social situation, skills, behaviour or communication skill they are struggling to master or cope with.

 

The situation or skill etc. is broken down into relevant social cues with appropriate images in an almost comic like style to show the autistic child by answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.


To learn more about the treatment goals autism and the latest on autism treatments like social skills stories and visual flash cards, Pecs and so on visit sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids


Social stories with pictures

Tuesday, August 10th, 2010

Social Stories with pictures are excellent visual strategies that help children with autism spectrum disorder learn social and communication skills and behaviours, a social story can show a child with autism what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.


Social stories with pictures can help a child with autism overcome their fears or complete tasks which they need help understanding.


Social skills stories were developed originally as an aid to communication with autistic children. Social stories are now more widely used as visual strategies, an autistic resource and support, to help encourage and teach social, communication, imagination and sensory processing issues and behaviours.

 

A social story is a short visual story that has been written in a specific style and format.  It describes what happens in a specific social situation and presents information in a structured and consistent manner, by answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the feelings and thoughts of others.

 

Social stories with pictures or images and first person text are an excellen autistic resource giving clear, concise and accurate information about what is happening in a specific social situation, without un-necessary fluff.

 

The goal of a social story is to attempt to address the “theory of mind” or social skills deficits by giving individuals some perspective on the thoughts, emotions and behaviours of others.

 

The theory of mind or social skills deficits is common to all individuals with autism spectrum disorder. For individuals with autism spectrum disorder having social skills deficits can hinder their social development. Having social skills deficits affect how an individual processes information, thinks, act, reacts, communicates, interacts and behaves.


Using social skills stories can address many of the issues faced by children with autism spectrum disorder on a daily basis and long term, the social story can help with changes to routines, transitions and communication difficulties.


Generally children with autism spectrum disorder have communication difficulties and may act oddly in social situations, not because they want to draw attention to themselves but because they may not understand that others can have different opinions to them, or that other people may want to do something different to what they want to do.


This can make social situations unpredictable and confusing to the child on the autism spectrum. Social stories therefore help the child on the autism spectrum understand what is happening and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.


Most children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, therefore by implementing social stories with pictures for social, communication and imagination skills that need teaching is beneficial and can act as an appropriate role model to the autistic child.


To find out more about how social stories can help an autistic child learn social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Alternative sites offering appropriate social stories with pictures can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autistic visual supports

Sunday, August 8th, 2010

Visual supports are used to help people with autism spectrum disorder. Visual supports should be easy to implement, adaptable and portable, making them convenient and easy to use.


Research suggests that the vast majority of people with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they can process information easier when it is visual rather than written text or auditory.


Consequently, presenting visual information can help children with autism learn vital everyday living skills and behaviours, including communication skills.

 

Autistic visual supports are useful when teaching children with autism social, communication and imagination skills, as well as helping with transitions, changes to routines and sensory processing issues.

 

Research suggests autistic visual supports such as social skills stories are beneficial and can be adapted to suit all abilities and ages. Social skills stories follow specific patterns. Originally designed twenty years ago as a communication aid, this autistic support has since grown into a major tool in autism today.

 

Social skills stories answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which helps to reduce stress and anxiety.


Used as a tool in autism for teaching and supporting social and communication skills, social stories are used like a framework or role model explaining and visually showing the skills, situation or behaviour that the autistic individual is struggling to cope with or master.


Editable, printable, needing no formal training to use they can be personalized and adapted to suit any autistic individual. To learn more about social stories and how they are used and implemented to help children with autism learn suitable behaviours and skills visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find important information on social stories their uses and how they benefit children with autism spectrum disorder. There is also support and downloads of appropriate social stories which can be printed for convenience and ease of use. Other sites offering autistic visual supports such as social skills stories can be found at: 

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum

Saturday, August 7th, 2010

For children on the autism spectrum communication difficulties are common. Research suggests that the vast majority of children on the autism spectrum find visual information easier to understand than the spoken word.

Consequently, tools for autism such as visual supports cards and social skills stories are used more effectively for teaching and improving communication in children on the autism spectrum.

It is a fact that visual strategies work best with children on the spectrum. Therefore parents, teachers and other professionals use tools for autism like social skills stories to help address communication difficulties such as asking questions, having a good conversation, calming down and so on.

Social skills stories work well because they are visual, short pieces of first person text in specific patterns of sentence types. Which show by answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

A common issue in children with autism is their inability to process information in the typical manner. This inability to process information in many cases can lead to communication difficulties as well as social blunders.

A typically developing child naturally learns social and communication skills and the ability to read another’s body language and facial expression. Without this ability many children with autism can misread situations and cause harm or hurt feelings without that intention.

Visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum like social stories can be downloaded from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

By implementing visual strategies such as visual support cards and social skills stories you can teach your child with autism social, communication, imagination skills and behaviours as well as address sensory processing issues that are common to autism, like visiting a dentist, tooth brushing, getting a haircut and so on. Social stories are one of the major tools for autism used today, they are editable, can be personalized and printed for ease of use and convenience.

Learn more about visual strategies for improving communication in children on the autism spectrum like visual supports cards from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Visiting the dentist with an autistic child

Wednesday, August 4th, 2010

For many of us visiting the dentist is quite a scary thought which sparks an un-rational fear.  If parents have an un-rational fear, generally children will pick up on this and so the circle continues.


However this is not the case with autism, an autistic child will not generally pick up on their parents feelings and emotions. The ability to read facial expression and body language is missing in children with autism this is often referred to as the theory of mind.


So why for many parents is visiting the dentist with an autistic child so difficult?


Social skills deficits and sensory processing issues are common to autism. Autism is a developmental disability affecting an individual for life. Autism affects how the autistic individual thinks, acts, reacts, communication, imagination and how they process information.

 

Therefore looking at why visiting the dentist with an autistic child may be so difficult: The first consideration when taking an autistic child to the dentist many parents face is why do I need to see a dentist? This man or woman wearing a white coat, who expects them to lay in a chair with a bright light shining in their face, while they look into their mouth using strange equipment.


Although you yourself understand why it is important to have a regular check-up and keep your teeth and gums healthy. Your special needs child may not understand what healthy hygiene habits are, and indeed the importance of having healthy teeth and gums.


Finding autistic resources especially designed for autistic individuals that will help you explain the importance of dental check ups and healthy hygiene habits in autism can be difficult. But for many parents autistic resources such as social skills stories are useful for showing and explaining just these kinds of things.


So what do you need to be aware of when taking an autistic child to the dentist? Once you have actually got your child with autism in the dentist…


Your first hurdle could be the bright lights in the reception area, noise are their children waiting in the reception, other patients arriving, chatting, can you hear dentists treating other patients? Is there a buzzer or bell can you hear the receptionist on the phone while you’re waiting, all these small things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


Many autistic children are sensitive with sensory processing issues being common to autism. The mouth is one of the most sensitive areas on your body, so anything being put in or done to their mouth may cause an anxiety trigger for your special needs child.


The feel of the cold instrument entering their mouth, the drill sensation, the water spraying, the taste of the mouth wash or paste, all these things can be anxiety triggers to children with autism.


The feel of the dentist chair, the rubber gloves the dentist will wear, the bright light above their face, even the goggles they may be asked to wear are these coloured, if so this could also be an anxiety trigger for the ASD child.


Is the dentist wearing perfume or aftershave, the deodorant the nurse or dentist is wearing, the smell in the dentist room, even reception area, the lady opposite you waiting maybe she has perfume on that will trigger an anxiety attack for the ASD child all these things can have an affect when taking an autistic child to the dentist.


Maybe the dentist is not aware of the affects of autism and autistic sensory stimuli. Autism is growing in recognition but a lot of health professionals are still not aware of the affects of autism or autistic sensory stimuli and what they can do to help ease any anxieties.


As well as all these factors, probably the biggest factor of all is actually why…for many children with autism understanding why they are even there, why they need to let the dentist look in their mouth. Using social skills stories will help explain this before you even step foot through the dentists door.

 

It is always a good idea to speak with the dentist before taking your child along, explain the affects of autism, what autism is and how your autistic child reacts to certain sensory stimuli. Explain sensory processing issues and that your autistic child is sensitive to stimuli and how this can be helped while your ASD child is there.


For example is there a private waiting room away from the busy reception area. That could be quieter and less likely to trigger anxieties before they even get into the dentists treatment room.

 

Can the instruments be warmed under warm water before they are used in your child’s mouth can your special needs child bring their own sun glasses along to protect their eyes rather than wear the dental glasses.


That way you can introduce the sun glasses at home before the visit, giving your special needs child time to get used to them before the check up.

 

Do you have ear muffs that could block out the noise of the drill? Ask for the mouth rinse to be plain water.


All these things need consideration before visiting the dentist with an autistic child.


One excellent autistic resource you will need to implement especially before the dental visit is a social skills story. The social skills story can help explain why they need to visit the dentist and some of the things that will happen while they are there. Research shows many parents use social stories to help prepare an autistic child to visit the dentist.


Social skills stories will give your ASD child clear instructions and explanations as to what is happening, answering the “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what showing visually what is happening, what they can expect from others at the time, and what others will be expecting of them.

 

Armed with a social skills story and the other suggestions I have made you can help your autistic child cope adequately visiting the dentist. Social stories are an autistic resource that is used for helping a child with autism cope with many other skills, situations, activities and events that they will come across in their everyday lives, things we take for granted as “normal”. But to an autistic child can be distressing even frightening.


For a carefully planned and written Autism dentist social story visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find more information on social skills stories that will help your child with autism cope with and understand social situations they may be struggling with like for example Autism dentist social story

Social stories for getting a haircut,

Social stories for a hospital visit

Social stories for students and so on


Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get downloads of 100 social skills stories.

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Probably one of the major roles a parent plays in their child’s development is teaching their child social skills. For example daily living skills like potty training, interaction skills like sharing, taking turns, and allowing others to talk without interrupting.

 

Typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally by people watching, observing how those around them do things and handle social situations. We don’t really stop to consider how easily our typically developing children can master suitable age appropriate social and communication skills.


However this is not the case for a child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

 

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

 

For a child with an ASD learning social and communication skills naturally is not easy, due to social skills deficits common to all individuals with autism.

 

Individuals with autism do not people watch and fail to recognise some nonverbal communication such as gestures and signs, for example waving goodbye, a thumb’s up or shhhhhh etc.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder need direct teaching of social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Consequently, parents are encouraged to help their autistic youngster learn appropriate social skills. Having social skills deficits may mean your child fails to recognise subtle cues, maybe unable to read body language or facial expression and misunderstand language such as wit, humour, jokes and slang etc…


So; social skills deficits how can you help your autistic child overcome them, many parents use visual supports for autism. This is mainly because children with autism spectrum disorder are normally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and images, which makes using visual supports for autism beneficial.

 

Therefore using visual supports for autism is going to help you teach your autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills. There are various visual supports for autism available, but probably the best know and most affective are social skills stories.


A social skills story is a visual framework that is effective in teaching children with autism social and communication skills. A social skills story breaks the skills or situation down into relevant key points giving explanations of the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into nonverbal communication such as the thoughts, feelings and emotions that may be felt by others.


By using visual images and first person text a social story allows the child on the spectrum to visually identify with the skill or situation making it predictable and routine. Individuals with autism prefer to stick rigidly to routines and can become stressed if routines are altered or changed, social skills stories are ideal for this, they can prepare the autistic child for upcoming changes.


Social skills stories follow specific patterns of sentence types, are editable and printable making them convenient and easy to use. The social skills story can be used to teach most social and communication skills. For example potty training, using a toilet, washing your hands, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, not interrupting, asking questions, making friends, even social situations like visiting the dentist etc..


By breaking the skill or situation down in to understandable pieces, removing all fluff and irrelevant material etc the social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan allowing the child on the spectrum to feel more in control and comfortable. Removing all fear or dread of the unknown, the social story makes the skills or situation predictable just how a child on the spectrum likes things to be.


To learn more about social skills stories and how they are used to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Where you will learn more about…what are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them as well as getting downloads of social skills stories used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism.


Autism in teenagers

Sunday, August 1st, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is characterized by the triad of autistic deficits: which are social interaction deficits, communication deficits and imagination skills deficits. Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder display marked difficulties with socialisation, how they think, communicate and relate to those around them.

 

Individuals with autism may find it hard to make friends and understand what other people are thinking and feeling.

 

Most individuals with autism will prefer to stick rigidly to routines and become stressed when things change.

 

Some teenagers with autism can find it very hard to ask for help, this can mean they experience more frustration, anxiety and stress than typically developing teens.

 

Consequently, parents, care givers and teachers can struggle to communicate with the teen. For many parents this can be very frustrating especially during the teenage years and puberty.

 

Puberty in autism is not going to be easy, for a teen with an ASD puberty is confusing and difficult to cope with and understand. Changes in their body, transitions, experiences, sexual desires and needs and wants can alter. Puberty in autism need not be an uphill struggle.


Using appropriate resources and treatments for autism designed specifically to help around this period in a young persons life will be beneficial.


There are various treatments of autism available that can help with autism in teenagers such as social stories. Many teens will already be aware of this autistic resource and many will already be benefiting from their use.


Research into autism in teenagers and the subsequent treatments of autism available conclude that social stories are an excellent autistic resource for this period in a young person’s life. Using social skills stories as a strategy can help deal with issues such as puberty in autism, hygiene issues, menstruation, transition and so on, therefore reducing stress and confusion.


Social stories for teenage autism are easy to implement and need no formal training to use they can be edited, printed and personalized to suit each individuals specific needs.

 

Social stories for teenage autism break down the skill, situation or behaviour that needs addressing into small easier to understand pieces and can act as a role model showing the skill in a framework or step by step plan, explaining the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thought, feelings and emotions that are expressed or show by others.

 

Social skills stories should follow a specific pattern and use visual images or pictures to support the first person text. Generally an autistic people are visual thinkers and learners and will therefore respond better to information that is presented visually such as in social skills stories.

 

Developed primarily as a means of communication social skills stories are today one of the major treatments of autism used to help promote positive behaviour, teach social and communication skills and deal with sensory processing issues as well as prepare for changes, deal with negative behaviours and reduce anxieties and stress, such as the stress and anxiety felt around adolescents.


Social stories for teenage autism focus on a specific area of difficulty and allow the autistic teenager a chance to rehearse the skill making them more comfortable with and in the situation.

To learn more about how to help your autistic teenager through the teenage years by using social skills stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

OR http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asd_teens

 

Can be downloaded immediately for use with your teenager.