Archive for February, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder Social Skills Stories

Friday, February 26th, 2010


Autism Spectrum Disorder social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago as a method for teaching and communicating with individuals on the spectrum.

They were developed to aid communication in both verbal and nonverbal autistics. The goal being that individuals on the spectrum were able to use the autism spectrum disorder social skills stories as a tool to help them clarify and understand information and directions.

Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills stories provide the child with ASD explanations and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing.

Used effectively as a tool to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder the  social story uses visual cues to show the child with ASD what is expected of them as well as what they can expect from others.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social skills impairments which make social and communication skills difficult to master.

ASD social stories therefore help to teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder, visually almost like a comic strip script, the skill or behavior in terms of relative social cues and prompts making it easier for the child with ASD to understand the “wh” question (who, where, When, what and why)

Research shows us that teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder is made easier when visual aids are used.

Consequently, parents with autistic children and teachers use visual tools such as social skills stories for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder. The social skills story is visually rich and is used much like a step by step visual plan detailing the skill being mastered.

Showing the child with ASD visually possible outcomes, giving focus to the key points, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

The social skills story can also be used to help with routine changes, teaching skills and behaviors, explaining rules and so on…

ASD social stories use a specifically defined style and format. They are mainly written by experts in autism.

Many parents with autistic children, teachers as well as other professionals use social skills stories for autistic children to teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills stories for autistic children on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autimsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

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Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2010


Social stories are used as a strategy for helping individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions to understand situations, skills, concepts and behaviours they may be struggling to master or cope with.

Therapist Gray developed the social skills story around twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills to children with ASD. The social skills story follows a defined specific formula that has been time tested and proven to work affectively.

Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions are used to help with most situations and skills and can be adapted and implemented easily by parents, teachers and other professionals working with the child with ASD.

For example, a teacher may use a social skills story to help a student with autism feel more comfortable with recess or a lesson they may find confusing or stressful. The student with autism may also use a social skills story to help them cope with break times, home time and so on…

Teachers can use social skills stories for ASD to help within the classroom, helping the student with autism stay on track during lessons.

Generally individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual thinkers and learners meaning the will absorb information and instruction easier when that information is presented visually rather than written text or auditory.

A social story should describe a situation, skill, or concept in terms of relevant social cues, perspectives, and common responses using a specific formula.

The social story is used to help with communication, routines, explain rules, show how other people may be feeling explain other’s point of view, show the social cues in situations, also to help with routine changes, unexplained events and so on, helping the child with ASD understand and cope with the situation, skill, concept or behaviour.

The social skills story shows who, what, where, when, why by visually showing where and when a situation occurs, who is involved, how events are sequenced, what occurs, and why.

Social skills stories for ASD and related conditions can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other relevant sites offering social skills stories for ASD can be downloaded from sites such as

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

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ASD visual supports

Monday, February 22nd, 2010


Individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are generally visual thinkers and learners. Meaning they can understand and relate to information easier when it is presented visually, rather than auditory or written.

 

ASD visual supports are used to help individuals with autism spectrum disorder to communicate and clarify verbal communications.

 

The ASD visual support can be used by teachers to help them give information and instruction for example the ASD visual support can be used on a visual timetable to show the ASD student their daily schedule, lessons and other activities.

 

The teacher can also use ASD visual supports around the classroom to indicate to the ASD student for example the pencil tray, book corner, coat pegs and so on.

 

Presenting information in a visual manner helps the child with ASD understand and process that information easier, clarify any verbal instruction they are given.


ASD visual supports help the child with ASD interpret, understand and act appropriately.

ASD visual supports can be used to help with communication issues with both verbal and nonverbal individuals with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions.

 

To view and learn more about ASD visual supports and how they can help your child with ASD communicate and understand information, directions, skills and behaviours visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

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ASD social stories

Sunday, February 21st, 2010


ASD social stories are used as a tool when teaching social and communication skills to children with ASD. Social stories were first developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray as a tool to help her communicate and teach the autistic children she was working with.

ASD social stories provide the child with ASD explanations and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing due to their individual autism symptom.

ASD social stories are used by parents of autistic children and teachers to effectively teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Social stories use visual cues that show the child with ASD what is expected of them as well as what they can expect.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social skills impairments; it is due to these social skills impairments that a child with ASD has difficulties with social and communication skills and behaviors.

As with typically developing children no two autistic children will ever be the same and therefore the severity of autism symptom will vary. ASD social stories can be adapted to suit individual needs and abilities.

Research shows us that teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder has been identified as one of the best indicators of positive long-term outcomes in the child’s development.

Consequently, parents of autistic children and teachers use tools such as social stories to teach and re-enforce social skills. The social skills story will help the child with autism identify the important cues in a given situation.

The social skills story will show the child with ASD visually possible outcomes, giving focus to the key points, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

It will also explain rules, routines, situations, upcoming events or abstract concepts; and how the child with autism spectrum disorder can understand expectations, cope with changes to routines and learn appropriate skills and behaviors.

ASD social stories use a specifically defined style and format. They are mainly written by experts in autism and are usually visually rich. Most children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners making visual social skills stories an ideal teaching tool.

Many parents and teachers as well as professionals use social skills stories for autistic children to teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download ASD social skills stories for autistic children on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autimsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Social stories for teenagers with ASD

Thursday, February 18th, 2010


Social stories are used effectively by parents and teachers of teenagers with ASD as an intervention strategy that teaches social, communication, interaction, imagination and self help skills and calming methods.


Generally individuals with ASD have great difficulty dealing with unforeseen situations and changes to routines, this is common in autism and aspergers syndrome individuals.

 

Social stories were first developed by therapist Carol Gray as away to teach those with social deficits appropriate skills and behaviours.

 

A social story uses specific types of sentences to teach social skills. It is always written in first person text and will normally include visual images to help the ASD teenager identify and understand the skill or behaviour being taught or re-enforced.

 

Social stories for teenagers with ASD are written for specific situations or events such as puberty, going out, friendships, and hygiene issues and so on.

 

A social story is an easy and effective way to teach teenagers with ASD.  How to deal with skills, behaviours and situations in an age appropriate manner. By describing the particular situation, skill, event or activity in detail paying particular attention to key points, giving clear concise information about what to expect in that situation and why.


They can provide the individual with ASD some idea of how others might respond in a particular situation and therefore provide a framework for appropriate behaviour.

 

Generally social stories are visual which is ideal; for the majority of ASD teens that tend to be visual thinkers and learners, making social stories perfect. To learn more and download social stories for ASD teens visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

 

Alternatively social stories for the teenage aspie can be downloaded from


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/aspergers_adolescents

 

Other related social stories for ASD can be downloaded from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

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Autism birthday party social story

Thursday, February 18th, 2010


Social stories are simple visual scripts / stories similar to a comic strip conversation, that describe in no frill details using appropriate first person text, social events and situations that are difficult for a child with autism to understand.

 

For example some children with autism do not understand the social behaviour expected at a birthday party or indeed the how, why where and what of the situation.

 

Therefore some parents of children with autism choose to help their child cope with and understand the birthday party by using visual supports such as an autism birthday party social story.

 

The autism birthday party social story is written to help the child understand what is expected of him or how he is suppose to behave at the birthday party.

 

A simple social story can be used to help a child with ASD cope with many situations, activities and events that they may struggle to master or understand, for example making friends, sharing, taking turns and so on.

 

Generally children with autism lack social and communication skills, this is due to their social skills deficits that are common with autism and other related conditions. Research suggest that generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners which makes visual supports such as social stories ideal for teaching social and communication skills to a child with ASD.

 

First developed around twenty years ago social stories are a significant tool used to help teach social and communication skills and behaviours to children with ASD and related conditions with great success rates. A simple social story can be used as a visual plan showing the skill or behaviour in a manner the child with ASD will understand much like looking at a comic strip with visual images and text detailing the skill or behaviour following a specific formula first developed by therapist Carol Gray.


Parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals can now download simple effective social stories from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com that are easy to implement and use.

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Other sites offering social stories to children with ASD and related conditions that cover a wide range of skills and situations can be found at any of the following:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


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Visual supports for children with autism

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers; which means they think in pictures. Therefore, the most successful ways to help children with autism learn and understand the information they are given is through visual supports and aids.

 

Many teachers and parents of children with ASD report negative behaviours and frustrations felt and displayed by children with autism when information is difficult to understand, such as written or oral instruction etc, rather than visual.

 

For many children with autism spoken words are not easy to comprehend, much like listening to a foreign language, which can be frustrating and stressful this can lead to meltdowns and the child generally just “switching off”

 

Consequently, it has been found that when attempting to teach or convey information to a child with ASD, using visual supports for children with autism is beneficial. Avoiding long spoken sentences or pieces of text with no illustration is advisable for most children with ASD.

 

Visual supports for children with autism are generally used to help support oral commands and information, for example visual support cards can be used to help show a child with autism the toilet, coat peg, library and so on..

 

The most significant visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual support cards or (PECS) as well as other support aids such as social stories.

 

By using visual support cards it allows the child with ASD to focus on the message being taught or the information being presented.

 

In the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to help the student with ASD organize their day for example on a visual timetable. The student with ASD will like repetition and sameness, a visual timetable can help achieve this, the student can easily identify what lesson is coming up next, what they need to do, where they need to be etc.


Also in the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to show direction and information. For example many teachers of students with autism place visual support aids on the pencil draw, the bathroom, sink and so on to help the student with ASD identify easily where things are, this can save a lot of confusion and stress not only for the teacher but also the student themselves.

 

In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual supports aids around the home again on a visual timetable, helping the child identify mealtimes, bath time, time for school and so on.


In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual aids to help the child identify certain areas, things, objects etc, for example the toilet, sink, where the cups are stored and so on.

 

Visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder are also used to help the child with ASD learn social and communication skills, for example brushing your teeth, hair and so on. Used as a strategy visual supports can be used with social stories affectively to teach skills, communication and behaviours. Many parents of ASD children find used as a strategy visual supports and social stories are beneficial and both are recommended to help all children with ASD learn appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.


To learn more and see examples of visual supports for children with ASD and related conditions visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Social stories that help can be instantly downloaded from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Children with ASD within mainstream classroom

Monday, February 15th, 2010


For many children with ASD being in mainstream education can prove challenging. Difficulties with social and communication skills are generally one of the major issue; for example listening and communicating with the teacher, making friends, staying on task and following school rules can all prove stressful for the student with ASD.

 

For a typically developing student the ability to communicate and “fit in” socially come naturally. These skills need direct teaching when your child or student is autistic. An otherwise typical situation or activity can be challenging for the student with ASD this is mainly due to social skills deficits which are always present in autism, many students with ASD may also have sensory processing issues this is also common in autism.


Generally a major stumbling block for many students with ASD will be interactive lessons such as P.E.

 

Many autistic students may have trouble following classroom directions and rules. Plus a lack of social understanding and communication, which is caused through social skills deficits, can lead to bullying and social isolation for many autistic students.

 

Recent studies show teachers find that teaching strategies need changing so that can effectively teach students with autism. Changes in teaching methods to help with issues such as imagination deficits, concentration, and changes to routines or lessons that help students with autism feel more comfortable in the class.

 

Children with ASD within mainstream classroom prefer routines and sameness. For many teachers of students with autism using strategies such as social skills stories helps the student settle within the class, understand, stay on track and can reduce negative behaviours and melt downs.

 

Research also shows us teachers of students with autism have made significant improvements for most children with ASD within mainstream classroom after autism social skills stories were implemented.

 

Autism social skills stories are used as a resource for all situations within the school that the autistic student is struggling to understand and deal with.


Significantly, autism social skills stories for students with autism give the student clear instructions on how, to deal and cope within the class and school. Which will help the student with ASD understand, stay on task and be more comfortable learning and managing their behavior and social skills, such as making friends, asking questions, assembly and so on?

 


Download autism social skills stories for students with autism from

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources


Or download social skills stories for all other issues and problems faced by children with ASD from:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

www.autismsocialstories.com/potty

 

 

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Social skills to implement with nonverbal autistic children

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

All children with autism have social deficits and will more often than not lack the ability to read others thoughts and body language often referred to as the theory of mind. As typically developing we have the ability to read and determine the thoughts, feelings and emotions of those around us.

In fact Temple Grandin described her inability to understand the social communication of Neurotypicals as leaving her feeling “like an anthropologist on Mars”.

Toddlers with autism have more striking social deficits; for example they may avoid physical contact and make less eye contact. Toddlers with autism are far more likely to communicate non-verbally by manipulating another person’s hand.

Reports suggest that up to half of the children diagnosed with ASD will not develop appropriate communication skills and speech. And many children diagnosed with ASD may never develop speech.

This lack of appropriate communication skill can for many children diagnosed with ASD prove a real problem. For those nonverbal autistic children many parents and teachers use visual support cards and social stories that help the children with ASD communicate, learn, interact and understand the world around them.

Social skills to implement with nonverbal autistic children can be achieved through the use of visual support cards which can be used in conjunction with visual timetables, now and next boards and social stories.

 

What are visual support cards and how do they help? Small laminated cards showing images or pictures, some may contain text too. Sometimes referred to PECS (picture exchange communication system) used widely to help nonverbal autistic children communicate.

 

Visual support cards for social skills to implement with nonverbal autistic children can be downloaded and viewed from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids


For social stories visit that can be used in conjunction with these visual support cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

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Autism within the classroom

Monday, February 8th, 2010


With an ever increasing umber of special needs students joining mainstream classrooms, teachers face the challenges of meeting their needs whilst creating an inclusive and challenging learning environment for all students.

 

Teachers are able to use several alternative strategies that can help them deal affectively with those children with ASD.

 

After first establishing the student’s capabilities both verbally and intellectually a teacher can assess which strategies will best suit the student with ASD. 

 

Some special needs students with autism are high functioning and able to use language and cognitive abilities to express what they are thinking.

 

However some special needs students with autism may be non-verbal; in these cases children can communicate with visual supports aids for autism (PECS -Picture Exchange Communication System). These visual aids for autism have wide uses within the autism classroom.

 

For many students with autism trying to communicate and be understood is difficult, they may lack the ability to effectively communicate, which is a common problem in autism.  For example children with ASD can have difficulties asking questions, taking turns, sharing even forming friendships this can be frustrating and stressful, causing some special needs students with autism to become agitated.

 

Teachers are able to help by providing an organized classroom with specific areas that the student with autism may locate easily through the use of visual support aids for autism like verbal or visual clues for the autism classroom. For example visual supports cards can be placed in special areas such as the bathroom, coat pegs, pencil tray and so on, for easy identification taking away stresses.

 

The images used in visual supports cards are easily identifiable to all special needs students and can be used not only as visual supports cards placed around the autism classroom but also on visual schedules, now and next boards and as cues for social stories.

 

Teachers also find the use of social skills stories for students with autism beneficial and are now one of the major strategies used by teachers for helping student’s better cope within the autism classroom.

 

Social skills stories for students with autism are visually rich showing the student the how, why, where and when of the skill or behaviour that they are being used to teach or re-enforce. First developed almost twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills, social skills stories are used effectively by both parents and teachers to help children with ASD understand and cope with all skills and situations they struggle to understand and deal with.

 

To find out more about how social skills stories can be beneficial to children with ASD and in the autism classroom visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources


For all other social skills stories visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

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