Archive for December, 2009

Problems in the classroom for autistic children

Thursday, December 31st, 2009

Chances are a child with autism in mainstream education will not require special education, which means they are unlikely to have obvious learning disabilities. But that said they will still have special needs.

 

The first thing as a teacher you should do is to speak to other members of staff including SENCO in your school. Make sure that everyone understands what autism is and that they are aware of how this will affect the child’s behavior. You should also make the other children in the class aware of their new class mate’s condition and explain that this may affect how the new member of class will act.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues you will need to address is to prepare all autism classroom accommodations before the child with autism begins school.

 

Generally a good start with addressing autism classroom accommodations is to prepare the class for the new student by adding visual prompts or cues, to areas of the classroom for example the coat pegs, toilet, art area etc. Ask the parents for a meeting and try to identify the autistic child’s strengths and weaknesses. You can build on the strengths and encourage these.

 

For many children with autism will prefer their own company, however older children and teens may feel left out or lonely. Sometimes it can be helpful to structure break times to avoid any problems. Sometimes it may be necessary to appoint a buddy system for the student with autism to help them cope with break times and recess.


Many parents will already be using visual aids for autism with their child before they begin school it is a good idea to carry on with these within the classroom also. Generally most children with autism will be visual learners and will respond well to visual aids for autism, such as visual timetables, PECS and social stories. These will all help avoid many of the problems in the classroom for autistic children.

 

Try using visual aids for autism when teaching a subject that requires abstract thinking. You could maybe use photographs or pictures to help keep the autistic child’s attention. Even at secondary school, it is still possible to use visual aids for example illustrations or diagrams could be added to worksheets.

Visual timetables are used to help overcome problems in the classroom for autistic children with routine and any change to the routine. The autistic child can quickly recognize what is happening as has a visual cue for the various different times of the day, like break times, recess, P.E lessons, home time etc.

You may want to include time for the bathroom as this is a confusing time for most children with autism.

Many teachers find using autism social stories a significant advantage, as a tool for helping the autistic child keep on task and understand what is expected of them throughout the day and what they should expect from other’s.

Autism social stories are used with great affect in classrooms for all times of the day and all activities they are also invaluable for explaining classroom rules, personal space, assembly, recess and so on which are all areas many students with autism struggle to understand and cope with.

Developed to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism social stories are written in first person tense with visual images setting out a step by step visual plan that the autistic child can relate to and follow. By simply showing the autistic child the what, where, when and how for all areas and skills that they may struggle with. They are also used effectively for changes to routines, sport’s day and so on showing the autistic child what they can expect, and what others will expect from them.

 

Reports suggest autism social stories should be included in all autism classroom accommodations, experts agree students with autism DO benefit from the use of autism social stories within their daily routines and at home.

 

To download social stories for students with autism visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Alternatively social stories for students with autism can also be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Other autism social stories can be downloaded from


http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Communication goals for children with autism spectrum disorder

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009


Autism spectrum disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting the individual’s brain.

 

One of the significant issues reported by parents of children with autism spectrum disorder is their child’s communication, social, imagination and interaction skills deficits.

 

These deficits are often referred to the triad of autistic impairments.

 

This triad of autistic impairments is present in every autistic individual. However the severity of social skills deficits will differ between each autistic individual.

 

The communication problems of autism vary depending upon the intellectual and social development of the autistic individual.

 

Many parents of children with autism spectrum disorder report delayed speech in their child and in some cases language may never develop. However recent figures show only 9% of autistic individuals will not develop language, with some having rich vocabularies and are able to talk about topics of interest in great depth.

 

Almost all children with autism spectrum disorder will have difficulty effectively using communication skills and language. Many children with autism spectrum disorder also display deficits with word and sentence meanings, intonations, and rhythms.

 

Many autistic children often say things that have no content or information with some autistic children using echolalia, a repetition of something previously heard, for example from a TV program, cartoon or other auditory means.


Many autistic children will use immediate echolalia for example they may repeat a question, “Do you want something to drink?” instead of replying with a “yes” or “no.”

 

Delayed echolalia, is when a child will say, “Do you want something to drink?” whenever he or she is asking for a drink.


Generally children with autism do not make eye contact and have low attention spans.

 

Many children with autism are unable to use gestures as a means of communication, for example sign language, or to assist verbal communication, such as pointing to an object they want. These are probably some of the more significant communication problems of autism.

 

Therefore communication goals for children with autism spectrum disorder will vary dependant on individual needs.

 

For most autistic children deficits in communication both verbal and non-verbal can be helped through autistic visual supports. A significant number of parents report benefits and progress with communication goals for children with autism spectrum disorder using autistic visual supports such as autism social skills stories.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners and find benefits using visual supports for autism such as social skills stories beneficial helping them find coping methods for their individual communication problems.

 

Social stories for communication deficits in autism are generally written by experts in autistic behaviors and development. Social stories are always written in the first person using appropriate language and from the autistic child’s point of view, normally visually rich they describe the skill or communication goals for children with autism, giving clear focus to the main points and social cues.

 

Social skills stories are one of the major tools used as visual supports for autism and are now available for immediate downloads form sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Many parents and teachers use social skills stories to teach communication skills such as asking questions, holding a conversation and learning how to greet other people.


To help develop and reach appropriate communication goals for children with autism spectrum disorder download and begin using social skills stories immediately.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and gain access to immediate downloads visit any of the following sites:



http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources




Teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009


We all need to be able to communicate to express our thoughts, feelings, needs and wants. As typically developing individuals we learn the skills of both verbal and non-verbal communication naturally, through things like our peers, families, schools and the environment. The ability to naturally acquire communication skills is absent in autistic children.

 

We communicate for many reasons, to offer help, support, to alert children to hazards and dangers, learning and for recreation. As typically developing individuals we also have the ability to read and send non-verbal communication of our thoughts, wishes, desires, needs, hopes and so on. By communicating we can also share so our experiences and knowledge through verbal or non-verbal means.

 

For autistic individuals the ability to communicate affectively is missing!

 

However there are treatments and resources for autism available to parents and educators of autistic children that will help with teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors. One of these treatments and resources for autism is called social stories.

 

What exactly are social stories?

Developed to help autistic individuals learn a functional means of communication the social story is appropriate for children with autism to learn and use appropriate social and communication skills and behaviors the majority of us learn naturally.

 

For example making friends, learning to play, listen, ask questions, use the bathroom, understand school rules, share, take turns, understand personal space and so on…

 

Social stories are a significant factor in teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors and are widely used by parents and educators of autistic children with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is a short, visually rich, descriptive piece of text written in first person tense which sets out in a step by step visual plan a skill, behavior, situation, task etc. in a way the child with autism can understand and follow simply. It shows the child with autism the what, why, where and when making them more comfortable with the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

The social skills story can be quickly and easily implemented and edited to suit individual needs. They can be read daily or whenever needed and can be used on their own or with other social stories depending on what help and support is needed.

 

To learn more about social stories for autistic children and young people; and how the can help you with teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors to your child with autism visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites and gain immediate down load of social stories for autistic children and young people.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school



http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Visual supports resources and children with autism

Tuesday, December 29th, 2009


Autism spectrum disorder is a disorder affecting the brain of the individual, there is no known cure for autism the condition will affect the individual throughout their entire life. Autism spectrum disorder affects the way an individual with autism communicates and relates to the people around them.

 

All people with autism including kids with autism spectrum disorder will display autistic social skills deficits. These deficits affect the individual’s social and communication skills and behaviors as well as imagination.

 

One of the major issues reported by parents of children with autism is their autistic child’s social and communication deficits, sometimes speech can be delayed and in some autistic children it may never develop.


Many kids with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties understanding language both spoken and non-verbal; autism and language can be a major issue for many individuals with autism spectrum disorder.


What is the affect of autism and language on children with autism?

 

Generally kids with autism spectrum disorder may display autistic social skills deficits in all areas of communication. They will be unable to read facial expression and body language this inability is often referred to as the theory of mind.

 

The theory of mind relates to how an individual reads another person’s thoughts, expressions and body language we “mind read” we can decide what a person is thinking, or feeling by looking at them.

 

We also have the ability to understand language for example different tones of voice, slang, wit as well as things like humor and sarcasm, these abilities are missing in individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Therefore kids with autism spectrum disorder will think and see things in a literal manner, which can lead to missing sometimes essential social cues and can lead to social mistakes and blunders.

 

This lack of social and communication skills is helped with visual supports resources and children with autism, for example social stories for autism.

 

A significant amount of parents of children with autism as well as autistic educators use social stories for autism to help with the various difficulties and behaviors which are displayed by individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Social stories teach social and communication skills to children with autism. Using appropriate language and visual images, social skills stories explain with text and visually the skill or behavior being taught from the autistic person’s point of view.


Parents of children with autism have been using social skills stories to teach social and communication skills to children with autism with great success and recommend this form of treatment. These visual supports resources and children with autism can be downloaded from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

You can find more information on social stories for autism and gain immediate downloads of social stories to help teach social and communication skills from this site as well as the sites listed below

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Teaching social and communication skills to children with autism

Tuesday, December 29th, 2009


Many parents of children with autism experience communication problems with their autistic child.

 

And trust in autism visual supports such as social skills stories as a strategy for teaching and re-enforcing social skills and behaviors. Many parents of children with autism, care givers and autistic educators use social skills stories and report tremendous successes.

 

In recent studies it was shown that these simple yet effective autism visual supports are used widely, as a tool for HELPING parents of children with autism and autistic educators deal with behavior, communication and social issues their autistic child or student is finding hard to understand or cope with.


Used as autistic visual supports for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism social skills stories can be downloaded and implemented quickly and easily from various sources such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com and are used effectively to teach social skills and behaviors.


The fact is kids with autism are often overwhelmed by noises, sensations, and activities that the rest of us consider “everyday” or “normal” which can lead to communication and autistic behavior difficulties.  Which can then in turn lead to tantrums and on occasion’s violent outbursts. They dislike surprises, and respond well to repetition.

 

This is where many parents of children with autism find social skills stories can be very beneficial to help with teaching social and communication skills to children with autism such as personal space, temper tantrums, violent outbursts, healthy hygiene habits, how to ask questions, how to make friends and many other issues, events, activities and situations are dealt with through the use of social skills stories.

 

Social skills stories are simple, understandable, first-person stories with visual aids that can help to calm and address even the most severe behaviors. Social skills stories work because they put an end to the stress, worry, and anxiety both you and your child with autism feel whenever a routine changes, a new skill needs mastering, or something changes, even something small. They help YOU teach YOUR child with autism vital coping strategies for social skills both everyday and less common.

 

To download and learn more about social skills stories for autistic children and how they are used for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or any of the following sites for expertly written social skills stories for autistic children


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

How to make friends social story for kids with autism

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009


Making friends and social interactions are difficult for kids with autism spectrum disorder; this is due to the social skills deficits associated with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Many parents of kids with autism spectrum disorder report their child with autism appears to live in their own world, preferring their own company, sameness, and routines plus they appear aloof and detached from others.


This detachment is due to the child’s social skills deficits also. For some parents of kids with autism spectrum disorder this detachment can be upsetting especially if the child with autism is shying away from cuddles and closeness.


As a typically developing child grows they become more socially aware and will want to interact with their peers and others, they will become imaginative and want to explore. However these social skills are not naturally developed in the child with autism, and in most cases kids with autism spectrum disorder will need direct teaching to help them develop socially.


For many parents the idea of their child being lonely and not making friends is difficult, many children with autism especially those with high functioning or mild autism do want to be social but do not know how. Therefore parents are left wondering what autism supports to use; how to make friends social story for kids with autism is the answer using autism social stories as a strategy to help children with autism to make and maintain friendships has proven to be very successful .

 

Experts agree using autism social stories as a strategy are beneficial autism supports to use. Therefore using a how to make friends social story for kids with autism can help you show your child how they can make friends visually. Most autistic kids are visual learners and will benefit from the visual images and representations in the social story.


Developed twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills autism social stories are now one of the major autism supports used and can be downloaded from sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com The social story is a visual almost comic like step by step plan that shows autistic kids visually with appropriate text added the what, why, where and when helping them understand and feel more comfortable with situations, skills and behaviors they struggle to master or find stressful or confusing.


For example an how to make friends social story for kids with autism will describe and visually show the autistic child how to approach making friends, what they can do, focusing on the key points the social cues, it describes and shows the autistic child what, why, where and when and suggests possible responses the child might like to give. It will suggest possible language for approaching other children, that autistic children can easily understand and use.

 

Many parents of kids with autism report success after autism social stories are implemented not only for making friends but also for other social skills their autistic child has been struggling with like asking other children to play, sharing, teasing, appropriate touching, personal space and many others.

 

To learn more about autism social stories and how they could benefit your autistic child visit any of the following sites:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Types of social stories for autistic children

Monday, December 7th, 2009


Social stories help to improve the social, communication, interaction and imagination skills and behaviors of children with autism spectrum disorders.

 

Using individualized short precise, descriptive stories to help them interpret challenging or confusing social situations.


The autism social story is written following a specific pattern and format; the autism social story will describe the skill, behavior or situation giving clear focus to the relevant social cues, the perspective of others, and will suggest behavior, and an appropriate response.


The general goal of social stories is to provide children with autism spectrum disorders or adults with no frill explanations about those situations, skills or behaviors that they find difficult, stressful or confusing.

 

For an autism social story to be successful, it should be relevant, written in first-person and present tense, with clear precise focus on the key points, these are the vital social cues, the things that might happen and why, and what the child with autism might want to do about it.

 

Developed almost twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills to children with autism, social stories have evolved into one of the major tools used in the development of interaction, social and communication skills of autistic individuals.

 

The major types of social stories for autistic children used are generally written by experts, however teachers and parents of autistic children can be taught to write social skills stories.  All types of social stories for autistic children from stories teaching common everyday skills such as tooth brushing, hair washing, eating habits to less common autism social stories such as visiting the dentist, getting a hair cut can now be downloaded from the internet from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com the autism social stories on this site are written by an expert in autism and are available for download.

 

Any child with autism can benefit from using social stories as a strategy for developing and re-enforcing social skills and behaviors.


To download and begin using social stories as a strategy to teach your child with autism visit any of the following site.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com



Social stories for pre-school children with autism

Thursday, December 3rd, 2009


Using social stories as a strategy to teach pre-school children with autism play, communication and social skills has proven beneficial to most preschoolers with autism and is now recommended treatment of social skills deficits in autistic preschool children.

 

Social stories for pre-school children follow a specific formula first developed almost twenty years ago to teach social and communication to autistic preschool children.


Generally social stories are an autism tool that is used to teach a social behavior to autistic preschool children. The autism social story gives pre-school children with autism information and visual prompts or cues about a social situation that they may find difficult or confusing.

 

Many parents of preschoolers with autism, educators and therapists across the world use of social stories to teach a social behavior to autistic preschool children;  With success rates ever increasing social stories are now one of the most significant autism resources available to help with routine changes, social, communication, imagination, interaction, play and behavior skills in children with autism.

 

The autism social story can be implemented and used for a variety of issues and problems from simple tasks such as learning to use the potty, tooth brushing, to less common skills such as making friends and behavior in preschool etc.


An autism social story is normally written in the present tense, from the view point of the preschooler with autism using first person language and is visually rich. The autism social story gives the autistic child a step by step visual plan of the situation, skill or behavior that is being mastered. This helps to give the autistic child a chance to practice the skill making them more comfortable in the situation.


Social stories for pre-school children with autism can be downloaded from sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

On this site you will find information on using social stories as a strategy to teach pre-school children with autism and can gain access to 30 social stories for pre-school children with autism. That will help you overcome some of the social skills deficits displayed by children with autism.

 

Visit: www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

Social skills goals for children with autism

Tuesday, December 1st, 2009


Social skills deficits are one of the major issues faced by children with autism. For many parents and teachers of autistic students teaching social skills becomes a primary focus. Success in teaching social skills to children with autism can lead to an increase in positive behaviors and self-confidence in both the home and the classroom for many autistic students.

 

Therefore teaching and achieving social skills goals for children with autism has become essential. Many parents and teachers of autistic children use strategies such as social skills stories to help them manage and teach social and communication skills to children with autism.

 

An autism social story is a short descriptive story much like a comic book script that details in a step by step action plan a particular social, communication skill or behavior.

 

An appropriate autism social story will focus on a particular social situation or interaction. For example: A shopping trip; meeting new people; recess; school dinner; assembly even a trip to the dentist. Any of these situations can be dealt with using an autism social story. The autism social story describes the situation, skill or behavior in detail. They are used to help practice skills and behaviors, mange negative behaviors, explain changes to routines and make confusing or stressful events and situations understandable by allowing the child with autism a chance to rehearse the skill or situation in advance.

 

Generally children with autism will find social situations confusing this is due to social skills deficits, therefore implementing a social skills story can turn an otherwise confusing situation into a more predictable and routine event taking away the confusion and anxiety.


The goal of autism social skills stories is to make the child with autism more comfortable and less anxious in the situation. Which will cut down on stress for you, and anxiety even meltdowns and other negative behaviors that the child with autism may otherwise display when feeling stressed and confused.

 

For a child with autism having a step by step action plan they can read and understand that is visually rich and easy to follow can be a tremendous benefit and reduce their fears and sensitivities.

 

Parents and teachers of autistic students agree that social skills goals for children with autism can be achieved easier using social stories as a strategy. Skills such as tooth brushing, hygiene, asking questions and calming down can all be tackled using social stories as a strategy.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and how they can benefit any autistic child visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you can download social skills stories on a variety of issues.

 

Other sites that offer social skills stories packages can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool