Archive for October, 2009

Social skill building with aspergers teenager

Saturday, October 31st, 2009

The teenage years are a time of increased social pressure for all teenagers including those with aspergers syndrome. The aspergers teenager will find the teenage years confusing and probably quite stressful.

 

For typically developing teens increased hormones and desires make the teenage years a time when social and personal relationships are key focus.

 

Finding a way to fit in may be harder than ever for a teen with asperger’s syndrome.

 

For the teen with asperger’s syndrome a distinct lack of social skills in reading non verbal communication such as facial expressions and body language can cause social blunders and mistakes.

 

Generally most aspergers teenagers do want to be social and have friends, but their lack of social and communication skills makes this difficult. For many aspergers teenagers they will already have friends and will struggle to understand changes in routines or behaviors of those friends.

 

This lack of social knowledge can of cause lead to social isolation for the teen with asperger.

 

For aspergers syndrome teens they may not truly understand the changes taking place within their own body and fail to understand the need for better hygiene or to wear more fashionable clothes, the slang often used by teens and so on. All parts of growing from a child to teen that any typical teen will naturally learn and follow. These difficulties make friendships hard to maintain and make for the teen with asperger.


However there are methods that can be implemented to help with social skill building with aspergers teenager, this is achieved through the use of social stories for asperger teenagers.

 

Many parents of asperger syndrome teens will probably already be using social stories as a means of teaching social skills and will already be aware of the benefits of implementing these vital asperger social skills training aids and supports.

 

But for those parents of asperger syndrome teens not using social stories yet the benefits are excellent and reports show great successes from using asperger social skills training supports in all areas of social and communication skills teaching.


Written by parents of asperger syndrome teens and professionals social stories for asperger teenagers are short visually rich age appropriate pieces of text detailing the social or communication skill being taught or re-enforced giving key focus to the main points being addressed.

 

So for example social stories can help explain and give solutions to hygiene issues, menstruation, swearing the use of language and so on all issues the teen with asperger will face and need to deal with effectively to be accepted by their typically developing peers.

 

To find out more about social skill building with aspergers teenager vist and download social stories for asperger teenagers that can help overcome issues faced during the teenage years go to:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

http://www.autismscoialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Social stories printables

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

Social stories help to improve the social skills of children with autism spectrum disorder by using short descrpitive social skills stories to help them interpret challenging or confusing social situations and behaviors.

 

Social skills stories have a specifically defined style and format, which was developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to teach social and communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.


They describe a situation, skill or behavior in terms of the relevant social cues, the perspective of others, and will normally suggest appropriate responses and behaviors.

 

Generally social stories are short descrptive pieces of text with visual images detailing the relevant social cues in any given situation. They break down the behavior or social skill into easire to understand steps by omitting irrelevant information.

 

The social skills story should be descriptive and visual to show children with autism how they can cope with and understand the behavior, skill or situation the social skills story is detailing

 

It should also include answers to the questions who, what, when, where, and why as well as “HOW” through the use of visuals and short pieces of written text.


Social stories printables are editable and can be downloaded from sites offering social skills stories for autism such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Generally teachers and parents of autistic children use social stories printables to teach all social skills their child with autism is struggling with for example social story using the bathroom, hygiene issues, school social stories and so on, infact all social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors can be dealt with using social stories printables.

 

To download social skills stories for your child with autism visit the above or any of the following sites:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autism goals for interaction

Sunday, October 25th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; which impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and causes restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication which can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Having autism spectrum disorder makes it hard for children with autism spectrum disorder to understand and relate to the world we live in, they fail to grasp social skills, which typically developing children and adults will naturally learn.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The autistic child will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in children with autism and social skills should be taught directly.


Generally children with autism are visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually. This is achievable using visual supports for autism such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help children with autism overcome social interaction difficulties.


To find appropriate autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads to this excellent autism tool:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

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Children with autism and finding friends

Thursday, October 22nd, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex developmental disability that typically appears during the first three years of life.

 

Autism spectrum disorder affects the normal development of the brain in the areas of social interaction and communication skills. Making life difficult for children with autism and finding friends.

 

Children with autism display deficits in verbal and non-verbal communication, social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors.  Typically children with autism spectrum disorder find it difficult to communicate with others and relate to the outside world and will often be described as being in a “world of their own”  In some children with autism spectrum disorder, aggressive and sometimes self-injurious behavior may also be present.


The symptoms and characteristics of autism may present themselves in a wide variety of combinations, ranging from mild as with aspergers to severe or low functioning autism.

 

Although the symptoms and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder are generally recognized by a certain set of behaviors, children with autism will exhibit various combinations of these behaviors dependant on the degree or severity of their diagnosis.  

 

Consequently, no two children regardless of diagnosis will ever be the same and may act very differently from one another and display varying skills and behaviors. This complex set of symptoms and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder make finding and maintaining friendships difficult.

 

Generally all autistic children will be visual learners and will gain a better grasp of learning life skills like making friends easier when the skills is taught using visual supports for autism such as social stories for autism.


Many parents realize that using visual supports for autism can impact on a better grasp of our world and how to interact affectively, giving the autistic child a better chance of social acceptance and less chance of social mistakes and blunders.

 

Developed almost twenty years ago to teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to autistic people the social skills story has evolved, and is reported as one of the most significant resources used today, to teach, and enforce, important life and living skills and behaviors to autistic people.

 

Sites offering information on how to use the social skills story to teach vital social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to those with autism can be found readily, one such site offering explanation and downloads of social stories like children with autism and finding friends is:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com These social stories for autism are written by an expert in autistic behaviors and can be downloaded immediately.

 

Other internet site’s offering downloads of social stories for autism are:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

 

Children with autism and mind reading

Wednesday, October 21st, 2009

Children with autism spectrum disorder will often display difficulties understanding why other people do not know the answer to a question they ask. Consequently, this lack of understanding that other people think differently to themselves may mean many autistic children will have problems relating socially and communicating with their peers and those around them.

 

Generally this will mean they may not be able to anticipate (mind reading or theory of mind) what others will say or do in various situations often called “mind blindness”

 

Many autistic children will appear aloof or cold, this is due to the same “mind blindness” They may have difficulties understanding that their peers, classmates even family have thoughts, feelings and emotions.

 

Since children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be very literal they display difficulties in understanding the subtleties of language and communication.


Some autistic children appear to live in a world all their own. They appear distant and closed-in, avoiding eye contact and shying away from their parents’ hugs. They may exhibit strange behaviors, like flapping their arms or obsessively lining up their toys.

 

All of these symptoms of autism are common, and can be treated using simple techniques that can help children with autism and mind reading. Treatments and therapies used for helping autistic children cope with “our world” can be found readily on the internet. Sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer advice on how to teach your autistic child the art on “mind reading”, simply offering the autistic child ideas and cues for how to behave, react and undertake social and communication skills they lack or find difficult.

 

This can help alleviate anxieties and make the autistic child more comfortable with and in situations that may find stressful of difficult.


Many parents and teacher use social skills stories to teach social and communication skills from every day skills like healthy hygigen in autism to more complex skills or routine changes such as school transitions, attending a wedding, funeral or changes to routines during the school day for example a substitue teacher, awards assembly and so on.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autistic children help explain the what, why, where and when to the autistic child making understanding easier. The social skills story focuses on the key points using appropriate language and visual images. Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners, therefore the visual representations used within a social skills story are beneficial and will help the child understand and remember.

 

To download social skills stories for children with autism and mind reading abilities as well as other topics and behaviors visit any of the following sites:



http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Resources and students with autism

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by significant deficits in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills, abilities and behaviors.

 

Students with autism spectrum disorder range in abilities and disabilities, from students with autism spectrum disorder that have severe intellectual disabilities to students that are intellectually gifted. With appropriate resources all students with autism can learn.

 

Although some autistic students may present educational disabilities and challenges, appropriate resources and students with autism can help them learn well, teacher implement systematic, and individualized teaching practices. As well as appropriate autistic resources such as PECS, daily schedules and social stories for autistic students.

 

Teachers of autistic students can help their autistic students by providing clear structure to the environment. Provide autistic resources and tools such as PECS, schedules and social stories ensure that the flow of lessons and activities is understandable and predictable.


Teachers of autistic students should have a clear focus on building and developing social and communication skills. This will help the student with autism develop skills for their current and future life in school, college, work, home, and community.


Students with autism display deficits in understanding and using speech as well as communication both verbal and non-verbal.


All autism classroom accommodations need to be expressed in a way that the student with autism can understand. This can be achieved through the use of schedules and social skills stories for autistic students.


Autistic children tend to be visual learners. In addition to providing autistic visual supports for understanding classroom expectations, many students with autism spectrum disorder will also need autistic visual supports to help them find means of communicating both verbally and non-verbally.

 

Generally all students with autism will have deficits with communication and may display difficulties expressing their needs and desires.


Teachers are finding the use of autistic visual supports such as social skills stories is helping students with autism cope within the school and classroom environment more efficiently. Social skills stories are actually helping students understand autism classroom accommodations easier as well as the rules of the school, plus what is expected of them throughout the day.

 

Social skills stories are used widely for autistic children and can now be downloaded straight from the internet. Sites offering autistic students school resources such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Are easy to navigate and offer excellent support to teachers of autistic students as well as parents and other professionals; resources and students with autism.

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories include:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Communication goals for children with autism

Monday, October 19th, 2009

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting an individual’s brain.


The common symptoms of autism are communication, social, imagination and interaction skills deficits. These common symptoms of autism are often referred to the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments is present in every autistic individual. However the severity of symptom will differ between each autistic individual.

 

The communication problems of autism vary depending upon the intellectual and social development of the autistic individual.

 

Some children with autism may be unable to speak, whereas others may have rich vocabularies and are able to talk about topics of interest in great depth.

 

Almost all children with autism will have difficulty effectively using communication skills and language. Many children with autism spectrum disorder also display deficits with word and sentence meanings, intonations, and rhythms.

 

Many children with autism often say things that have no content or information some autistic children use echolalia, a repetition of something previously heard, for example from a TV program, cartoon or other auditory means.

 

Many autistic children will use immediate echolalia for example they may repeat a question, “Do you want something to drink?” instead of replying with a “yes” or “no.”

 

Delayed echolalia, is when a child will say, “Do you want something to drink?” whenever he or she is asking for a drink.

 

Generally children with autism do not make eye contact and have low attention spans.

 

Many children with autism are unable to use gestures as a means of communication, for example sign language, or to assist verbal communication, such as pointing to an object they want. These are probably some of the more significant communication problems of autism.

 

Therefore the communication goals for children with autism will vary dependant on individual needs.

 

Parents can help their autistic child improve social and communication skills using social stories. Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners and will benefit from visual supports for autism such as social stories which can help teach children to cope with their individual communication problems of autism.

 

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray social skills stories were first introduced to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Social skills stories are one of the major tools used as visual supports for autism and are now available for immediate downloads form sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Many parents and teachers use social skills stories to teach communication skills such as asking questions, holding a conversation and learning how to greet other people.

 

To help develop and reach appropriate communication goals for children with autism download and begin using social skills stories immediately.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and gain access to immediate downloads visit any of the following sites:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Using visual supports in autism teaching

Friday, October 16th, 2009

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual learners often referred to as “visual thinkers”.

 

Teachers report better success rates using visual supports in autism teaching; especially if an activity is transferred from verbal to visual.

 

Using visual supports in autism teaching allows communication to occur on a verbal and nonverbal level. The idea is that using visual supports helps nonverbal students learn expressively as well as receptively.

 

Autistic students benefit from having access to visual supports such as social stories and PECS throughout their day.

 

Autism visual supports can help remind autistic students how to perform tasks such as assembly by showing them visually where they should be or what they should be doing.

 

By giving autistic students social stories you are helping them by providing them social, behavior and communication cues. 

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder can focus on the visual images and text in social stories which can help reduce anxieties surrounding tasks, events and occasions the autistic child may struggle with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder display difficulties with speech and language, which can make even the simplest on instruction difficult at times.

 

Because of these problems in understanding, some autistic children may become anxious and confused by certain times in the school day or by certain lessons.

 

For example recess, assembly, art lessons and P.E. This is where social stories for autistic students can benefit the child by providing visual supports in autism teaching the autistic student how to cope with whatever is troubling or confusing them.

 

To download various social stories for autistic students as well as other social stories for everyday activities such as tooth brushing, showering even how to visit grandparents, go shopping or out to eat can be downloaded from sites such as:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

What are the physical characteristics of autism?

Thursday, October 15th, 2009

There are not any outward physical characteristics of autism, you would probably not be able to look at a person and immediately notice that he or she is autistic?


That is until you try to communicate with that person. Generally, the first sign that a person is autistic is when he speaks or when he won’t make eye contact.

 

Maybe some of the physical characteristics of autism could be classified as repetitive or stereotypical movements, for example finger flicking, hitting their desks, or tapping a pencils.

 

While these actions in themselves aren’t an indication of autism, if the action is repetitive to the point of annoyance for those around them, with the person being oblivious to the irritation they have become to others.


Some of the more common signs of autism are:

 

* Poor upper body strength

* Low facial muscle tone

* Sometimes pale skin

* Repetitive stereotypical movements, such as head banging, finger   flicking, rocking etc.

* Impaired motor skills (motor and fine)

 

Research continues into this complex disorder, there are some rough guidelines established for identifying the physical characteristics and behaviors that could indicate the possibility of autism.

 

These are by no means complete lists and in all cases if autism is suspected a diagnosis of autism should be sought from a professional such as the child’s G.P. who will be able to advise you on the possibility of autism and refer you on to a specialist.

 

Other signs of autism in preschool children can include:


  • Shying away from physical closeness or cuddles
  • Treating people in the same manner as objects
  • Either lack of crying or excessive crying
  • Repetitive stereotypical movements or obsessive play with one item or toy
  • The need for routine without exception

 

After a diagnosis of autism there are specific treatments that can help with the symptoms of autism such as lack of verbal and non-verbal communication skills and social, imagination and interaction skills deficits.

 

One treatments used for almost twenty years by parents of autistic kids is social stories. Designed by therapist Carol Gray they were first introduced to help parents of autistic kids and professionals involved with the care and well being of autistic children to teach them appropriate social skills and behaviors.


Since there first introduction social stories have evolved into one of the major tools used for teaching social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to autistic children. They use visual representations and appropriate text to describe in detail giving key focus to the social cues the autistic child needs to learn the skill or behavior being mastered.

 

Parents of autistic kids and professionals such as teachers use social stories widely to help autistic children find clarity, learn and re-enforce vital, everyday and occasional skills they struggle to master or understand.

 

For example, tooth brushing, using the toilet or learning what is death, birth, a wedding or other skills such as claming down, asking questions and making friends.


To understand more about how social stories can help alleviate the symptoms of autism associated with the physical characteristics and behaviors of autism and develop vital social and communication skills for your autistic child visit one of the following sites:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school