Archive for September, 2009

The symptoms of mild autism

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009


Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurobiological disorder, there is no cure for autism and typically the symptoms of autism will be ongoing throughout the autistic person’s life.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by varying degrees of autistic impairments often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

These social skills deficits are typically displayed in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills and abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors.

 

The symptoms of autism range from mild autism which is often called asperger syndrome to severe autism or low functioning autism.

 

The symptoms of mild autism can vary between individuals on the spectrum. Although all children on the autism spectrum disorder scale may exhibit some similar traits not every child will display all of characteristics associated with autism.

 

A child with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may never develop speech or it may be delayed and may have other educational disabilities, while a child with autism on the higher end of the autism scale can be high-functioning with average or above average intelligence and attend mainstream school.

 

Some autistic children have sensory processing issues in some or all of the senses and may display sensory processing issues such as being sensitive to the feel of fabric so much so that all tags must be cut out of clothing before they will wear it. Another child with autism may display no sensory issues at all.


However, all children with autism spectrum disorder will display social skills deficits with communication whether your child has the symptoms of mild autism or severe they will all have communication both verbal and non-verbal communication skills difficulties.

 

A child with autism will have difficulties relating to other people and will fail to understand non-verbal communication or body language.


Children with autism spectrum disorder are often referred to as having “mind blindness” or lacking the “theory of mind”. This means missing the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions expressed by other people.


For example we can tell a lot by a person’s posture, we can tell whether they are approachable, upset or happy, this ability to read another person is missing in people with autism.


However there are treatments available to people with autism that can help them learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

The internet makes finding appropriate autism resources that help autistic people learn these social skills much easier. Generally most autistic people have found tremendous successes with autism resources such as social skills stories.

 

The symptoms of mild autism are such that generally most autistic children or asperger syndrome individuals can use social skills stories efficiently for coping and understanding social skills that they otherwise struggle to comprehend, which can sometimes lead to social blunders and stressful situations.


Sites that offer downloads OF SOCIAL SKILLS STORIES as well as expert advice and support like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


 


The behavior characteristics of autism

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009


The symptoms of autism disorder affect the brain of individuals.

 

The behavior characteristics of autism will for many parents have become obvious usually by the time their child has reached three.

 

Generally most parents of autistic children will have noticed unusual behaviors and social or communication milestones may not have been reached.

 

The symptoms of autism are made up of autistic social skills deficits.

 

These symptoms of autism disorder or autistic social skills deficits are deficits in social; communication both verbal and non-verbal, imagination and interaction skills, to varying degree’s these  social skills deficits will always be present.

 

The behavior characteristics of autism may also include autism sensory issues in some or all of the senses, sight, touch, smell, taste, and sound.

 

Children with autism tend to have a different view the world we live in and do not process sensory information in a typical manner. Children with autism do not naturally learn social or communication skills, and will need direct teaching of these skills, behaviors and autism sensory issues.

 

A typically developing child will learn social skills through their environment, peers, family and their own senses.

 

This can be achieved through the use of autistic visual supports such as social stories for autistic children.

 

Many parents of autistic children as well as teachers and other professionals use autistic visual supports around the home, school, college, and anywhere the child with autism needs help learning social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

Social stories were first developed almost twenty years by therapist Carol Gray to teach communication skills to autistic children.

 

Social skills stories are used by parents of autistic children for managing autistic social skills deficits, autistic behavior issues, plus autism sensory issues.

 

Reports suggest children with autism respond well to social skills stories because they represent the skill being mastered in a way that the child with autism can understand and remember using appropriate language, and visual representation of the skill.

 

For many parents, teachers and other professionals sites offering social stories for autistic children have become one of their main sources for vital autistic visual support like autism social skills stories.

 

Sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com offer immediate download of autism social stories for autistic children.

 

Social stories are used effectively in the treatment for managing the behavior characteristics of autism by providing appropriate support and visual representation of the skill or behavior the child with autism is struggling to master.

 

Download autism social skills stories from www.autismsocialstories.com and see for yourself how easy they are to use and how affective they can be.

 

Other sites offering downloads of autism social skills stories for managing autistic social skills deficits as well as autistic behavior and skills teaching are:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory




Autism social stories touch

Tuesday, September 29th, 2009



Generally all autistic people will display to differing degree’s autistic social skills deficits. Social stories attempt to address this.

 

Social stories are used to help autistic people develop and learn positive social skills and behaviors. Social stories are used to help give autistic individuals a perspective on the thoughts, feelings, emotions and behaviors felt and displayed by others.

 

Many autistic individuals will not act as we would expect in social situations mainly due to autistic social skills deficits.

 

Generally many autistic people fail to understand that others might have different opinions to them, or that others may want to do something different to what they want to do.

 

Therefore many social situations can become unpredictable, stressful and confusing for the autistic child or young person, especially around puberty.

 

Social stories therefore help the autistic child or teen to better predict the actions, reactions, thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

 

Social stories present the situation in a structured and consistent manner using visual images as well as appropriate text.

 

Social stories are written in the first person providing the autistic child with information about the social situation being mastered or re-enforced. To better prepare them to cope, remember and act appropriately in the situation.

 

This is true for appropriate touching an autistic person may not necessarily realize that they are not respecting someone’s personal space.

 

Therefore a social skills story to explain what appropriate touching is can benefit the autistic person and stop any social blunders, embarrassment or stress.

 

Autism social stories touch will provide appropriate behavior skills in a way the autistic person will understand and can cope with effectively.

 

Social stories are normally written by therapists, teachers, parents and other professionals for autistic children and young people to help them develop appropriate social skills and behaviors such as autism and appropriate touching.

 

An excellent site for downloading social stories for touch can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Or other sites offering downloads of social stories for appropriate touching as well as other social kills and behaviors can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Autism social skills lessons

Thursday, September 24th, 2009


Generally children with autism spectrum disorder will display challenging behaviors and lack social and communication skills.

 

Deficits in social and communication skills can include:

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder may display difficulties with initiating and responding to social interactions from others. 

 

The autistic child may display difficulties engaging in joint attention, the autistic child may have difficulties with skills such as sharing, playing, pretend play or make believe.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder lack being able to understand or demonstrate non-verbal social communication i.e. the “unwritten rules” of social interactions.

 

Children with autism are also often referred to as suffering from “mind blindness” meaning they lack the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions of other people; which can lead to social mistakes or blunders especially in teenage autistic individuals.

 

Parents of autistic children often struggle to find suitable ways of teaching social and communication skills to their autistic youngster.

 

This need not be a huge problem or issue for some families now with the onset of the internet and search engines such as google, the world has opened up to most of us, and sites offering support and advice to parents of autistic children can now be readily found.

 

A significant number of parents, professionals and schools use autism resources to help teach social and communication skills to autistic children. Autism resources such as social stories are readily used for teaching autism social skills, are visually rich and easily implemented, having all the correct components needed to effectively teach social and communication skills to autistic children.

 

As visual learners an autistic youngster will respond better to social skills stories for autistic children teaching autism social skills and many parents of autistic children as well as teachers and other professionals report great successes when social skills stories are implemented around the house and school environment.

 

Social stories for autistic children can be downloaded from many internet sites, professionally written and visually rich social skills stories for autistic children teaching autism social skills can be found at sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are also downloadable from autism resource sites, offering a wide range of various social skills stories teaching social, communication, interaction and imagination skills to the autistic youngster and the teenage autistic.

 

Autism resource site: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

Behavior characteristics of autism

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Generally the behavior characteristics of autism become apparent before the child’s third birthday. Parents of autistic children will normally have noticed something is not quite right, their child may be displaying odd behaviors and may not have reached milestones.

 

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder which affects the brain in individuals. Generally all autistic children will have autistic social skills deficits these deficits commonly make up the symptoms of autism.

 

These autistic social skills deficits are social, communication, imagination and interaction skills deficits and will always be present to a certain degree.

 

All autistic children are different and the degree of autistic social skills deficit will also be different some autistic children are low functioning and may never develop speech they may also have other educational disabilities. While at the top end of the autism scale is high functioning and asperger syndrome these individuals are often average or above average intelligence and have often been referred to as “geeks”.


The symptoms of autism can be severe in some cases while in others mild to moderate.

 

Generally the behavior characteristics of autism can also include sensory issues in all or some of the senses, sight, touch, smell, taste, and sound.

 

Autistic children view the world in a different way to typically developing children they do not process sensory information in the same manner. The autistic child will not naturally learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills unlike a typically developing child that will learn naturally the skills needed to function normally. The typically developing youngster learns social skills through their environment and their own senses.

 

The autistic child does not do this and will need direct teaching of behaviors, social and communication skills. This can be achieved through the use of autistic visual supports such as PECS cards and social stories for autistic children.

 

Many parents of autistic children as well as teachers and other professionals are already using autistic visual supports around the home, school, college and anywhere the individual with autism needs extra support or help to understand or cope.

 

One of the most significant autistic visual supports available to help autistic children is social stories. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are now probably one of the best known resources for teaching and re-enforcing social, communication, imagination and interaction skills to children with autism.

 

Reports suggest children with autism respond very well to social skills stories because they represent the skill being mastered in a way that children with autism can understand and remember using appropriate language, and visual representation of the skill.

 

The internet now makes it easier for parents of autistic children as well as teachers and others involved with the care of an autistic child to find and source expertly written social stories for autistic children.

 

Sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com offer immediate download of social stories for autistic children as well as support for all those involved in the care of an autistic child.

 

Social stories are used to teach behaviors and social skills effectively. They are used to help with the behavior characteristics of autism by providing concrete support and visual representation of the skill or behavior the child with autism is struggling to master.


Download social skills stories from www.autismsocialstories.com and see for yourself how easy they are to use and how affective they can be.

 

Other sites offering downloads are:

 


www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

Autism visual supports social story touch

Thursday, September 17th, 2009


Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder which causes impairments in the way individual’s process information.

 

Autism is characterized by social, communication, imagination and interaction skills deficits which are often referred to as autistic social skills deficits.


Generally all autistic individuals will have difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions. Autism spectrum disorder can make it difficult for autistic individuals to communicate with others and relate to the outside world. In some cases, aggressive and/or self-injuries behavior may be present.

 

Autistic individuals may also experience sensory sensitivities in the five senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste.

 

Generally autistic children and adults tend to be hyper-sensitive or hypo-sensitive.

 

Deficits in autistic sensory sensitivities: Touch, autistic children may have difficulties in discriminating between objects by touch alone, for example they may be unable to locate an object even if it is in their own pocket.

 

Sometimes autistic children will have a high threshold for pain and may injure themselves without realizing they have done so, which can be quite alarming for parents.


Some autistic children will appear clumsy and have poor body awareness which can make them bump into objects and people. Sometimes they may fall down a lot. They may use too much or not enough force when pushing, pulling, lifting or holding on to things even people!

 

They may have poor gross motor movements and poor upper body muscle strength. Some autistic individuals will have difficulties with fine motor skills they will struggle to hold coins or use a zip.

 

Some autistic toddlers can be confused and interpret their mother’s body as part of their own.

 

Some autistic children are sensitive to the feel of certain fabrics and substances they will dislike the tags in their clothes, as well as being touched etc.

 

These are all commonly reported autistic sensory sensitivities issues by parents of autistic children.

 

Parents of autistic children report significant autistic social skills deficits in touch with their autistic children. Social skills stories have been used as a means of helping those individuals with autism that have sensory sensitivities issues find ways of coping with the affects of sensory dysfunctions appropriately.

 

Social skills stories can be used for issues with touch for example an autistic child may be unaware of their own personal and other people’s personal space and insist on standing too close to other people, which can make others feel very uncomfortable using a social story in this situation can be very beneficial.

 

A social story for touch, for example appropriate touching, when it is ok to touch and not ok to touch for example keeping hands to your self and so on.

 

Also, social story touch for sniffing someone’s hair, hitting, dentist and so on all useful for autistic kids with sensory issues.

 

Social stories are widely used by parents of autistic children, teachers and other professionals to help teach and re-enforce essential and daily life social, communication, interaction and imagination skills to children with autism.


To get immediate downloads of various social skills stories for example social story for touch visit sites such as: www.autismsocialstories.com or www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


And gain immediate downloads of social skills stories for children with autism like appropriate touching, personal space and lots more autistic kids benefit from the implementation of social stories.

Preschool autistic children

Sunday, September 13th, 2009


Many parents decide not to send their autistic child to preschool, opting instead for the safe option of caring for the autistic infant at home in a safe secure environment.

 

However this option is not always ideal and many parents feel their autistic infant would benefit from preschool, or maybe work and family commitments means some parents are forced to make the decision of sending their autistic infant to preschool.

 

Whatever the reason the outcome is the same finding and then helping your autistic child with the transition from being at home to being in preschool.


To understand and be the best help to your preschool autistic child it is going to be paramount that you address some simple issues firstly.


Children with autism will always have autistic social skills deficits, which are difficulties with social communication both verbal and non verbal as well as deficits in imagination and interaction skills.

 

Generally, children with autism do not develop socially in the same manner as their typically developing peers. Typically developing children learn social skills through play and their environment; this is generally not the case with the preschool autistic child.

 

Most preschools or nursery schools will expect a certain amount of social and communication skills from the children joining. Therefore if it is your decision to apply and send your autistic toddler to preschool, you must first find out and ensure your autistic toddler meets this criteria.

 

If he does not it might be a good idea to first have a meeting with the teacher and explain at what level your autistic toddler is and how you can help to make the transition easier.

 

The preschool may ask that you come in with your preschool autistic child or that he attends for shorter periods, they may even refuse entrance until the appropriate social and communication skills have been learnt.

 

By social and communication skills, generally this will mean that your child is clean, for example can use potty or toilet, most preschools do not mind the odd accident. It may also mean your child can communicate, for example can answer simple questions, can recognize their own name and will be able to follow simple instructions. They may also require that your autistic toddler is able to feed themselves etc.

 

These are all general social and communication skills necessary from all children entering preschool.

 

There are ways in which you can help develop social and communication skills in your autistic child. This can be done at home the rest of the family can all help also should you wish.


Many parents are turning more and more to resources such as social skills stories for autistic children to help them develop appropriate social and communication skills in their preschool autistic youngster.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago the social skills stories for autistic children are designed to promote and teach social and communication skills. They were fist introduced by therapist Carol Gray to teach social and communication skills to the autistic children she was herself working with.

 

Since then social skills stories for autistic children have evolved into a huge resource widely respected and used by not only parents but also teachers, care givers and other professionals working with autistic children.

 

They are generally visually rich which is important, as most autistic children are visual learners and will respond far better to visual representations rather than the written or spoken word.

 

They also follow a set pattern of four different sentence types, which describe the skill in detail with the focus being on the important social cue.

 

Social skills stories are always written in the first person, and from the autistic youngsters point of view.

 

Research does show us that parents of autistic children that introduce social skills stories to their preschool autistic youngsters have had tremendous success rates in teaching essential daily life skills such as potty training, toilet training, help with eating habits, personal hygiene and other skills such as pretend play, making friends, asking questions, controlling anger and various other social and communication skills.

 

The internet makes it possible for parents of autistic children to readily source social skills stories from sites such as: www.autismsocialstories.com

 

PLUS various other sites dedicated to social skills stories for autistic children, teaching new social skills like potty training can be found at:www.autismsocialstories.com/potty

Or preschool autism stories at sites such as: www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

The internet is a host to many sites offering social skills stories to parents of autistic children which can help with issues like preschool autism as well as other issues sites such as:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/howto

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009


Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to the autism child ? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.


There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills and choose from various titles.

 

 

Children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009


Sensory issues are common in children with autistic spectrum disorder. Generally children with autistic spectrum disorder have sensory issues, which can make them either highly sensitive or under responsive to sensory stimulation such as sound, light, smell, taste and touch as well as other stimulation through their senses.


Sensory issues can take different forms and will vary between children for example: some children with autistic spectrum disorder may overreact and become anxious, scared even experience pain at certain sounds for example a bell (like the ring of the telephone) or siren, but will talk very loudly when speaking with other people.

 

Children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues may sometimes object to certain materials like rough-textured clothing on their skin or labels on the inside their clothes.

 

Sometimes children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues may only want to eat certain foods and may dislike certain textures of foods.

 

Some children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues can tolerate hugging but will become irritated and defensive when touched softly. This is sometimes referred to as “tactile defensiveness” which can make this set of autistic children appear disinterested in other people even their own parents, physical contact can make this set of autistic children irritated rather than consoled.

 

Generally all autistic children will have some form of sensory issue, parents can now make a difference to their child’s behavior using something called social skills stories.

 

For example some autistic kids are sensitive to sound, as shown above. Teachers have reported some autistic kids fear fire drills (sound) and that using social skills stories; for fire drills has been a huge bonus, helping keep autistic children calm, explaining to them what the fire alarm is why it is used and appropriate behaviors expected of them when the fire drill sounds.

 

Social skills stories are used for a wide range of sensory issues that affect autistic children both in the home and at school. Parents and teachers report significant improvements in autistic sensory issues once social skills stories are introduced.

 

Social skills stories are generally written by experts and are visually rich, as autistic kids tend to be visual learners and will respond better to visual supports and cues. They will always use first person appropriate language and will follow focus on the key points being addressed by the social skills story.

There are many sites on the internet offering parents and teacher the opportunity to download social skills stories to help with autistic sensory issues, one such site with stories such as fire drills is www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Other sites with social skills stories on various issues relating to children with autism and autistic sensory issues are:

 


www.autismsocialstories.com

Communication for children with autism

Friday, September 4th, 2009


Communication both verbal and non-verbal are probably one of the major skills we learn as we grow, we learn how to read minds and body language and also how we can affectively get what we need all using communication.


However for families with autism children this communication may not develop. Generally those with autism do not naturally learn communication skills and lack the ability to read both body and facial expression and language.

 

Where as a typically developing youngster will read a mothers expression and know how she is feeling, cross, happy etc a child with autism lacks this skill and will not be able to look at his mum and determine how or what she is thinking and feeling.

 

The skill of communication for children with autism needs to be taught directly, it is not going to develop naturally, they do not people watch and generally lack much interest in their surroundings, eye-contact is often hard for autism children which can make non-verbal communication very hard.


As with all autism social skills and behaviors most parents and professionals use autism resources to help teach and re-enforce autism social skills and behaviors. Resources such as autism social stories have been widely used with great affect since first being introduced almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

 

Visually rich, with appropriate use of language and text this autism resource is now available form internet sites that are set up and run by professionals in the treatment and management of autism individuals.


Generally, autism individuals are predominantly visual learners, and can better understand and gain more confidence from visual autism supports, as a means of understanding and learning the social and communication skills and behaviors which they lack, struggle with or that cause them stress and anxieties.

 

Readily available autism resources teaching social and communication for children with autism can be found on the internet on sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com which offer visual autism supports like social stories for immediate download.

 

Parents and professionals use autism social stories as a means of teaching autism social skills and behaviors through means of short visual representations of the skill needing to be mastered with appropriate image and text, always in the first person describing the skill through image and text from the autistic child’s point of view.


This method of teaching autism social skills and behaviors is very popular and can be implemented easily. Research suggests that kids with autism respond very well to autism social stories and their use continually grows as does the success rates of social skills teaching reported by parents.

 

For quick and effortless downloads of autism social stories for kids with autism visit one of many sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com 


OR:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

www.autismsocialstories.com/howto

How will autism affect my family?

Friday, September 4th, 2009


An autism diagnosis is a huge shock to the entire family. You may have already suspected that things were maybe not quite as they ought to have been, but nevertheless an autism diagnosis will still come as a shock.

 

There is no cure for autism and there will almost certainly be times the whole family will be affected.

 

Normal everyday activities like shopping, dentist, getting a haircut even visiting family members; can no longer be spontaneous or without complication or forward planning; even with planning these “normal everyday activities” can still be troublesome and stress filled for not only you but the autistic child and other family members.

 

Your life and that of your family will change, but there are therapies and treatments available that can help make life a little easier.

 

All autistic children will have autistic social skills deficits; it is these autistic social skills deficits, sometimes referred to as the triad of autistic impairments that make up the symptoms of autism

 

What are the triad of autistic impairments, and how do they relate to my child?

The triad of autistic impairments are: autistic social skills deficits in social, communication both verbal and non-verbal, imagination and interaction deficits, these are the main symptoms of autism and every autistic individual will have them.

 

A major issue for many parents of kids with autism is that of their autistic child’s social skills deficits in communication and social interactions. It is these social skills deficits that can make everyday normal activities like those mentioned above difficult and stressful.

 

Many parents of kids with autism have found by using autism resources such as social skills stories they can teach and re-enforce social skills and behaviors which typically developing children learn naturally.

 

Kids with autism do not learn social skills naturally and need to be taught those social skills and behaviors which typically developing children naturally learn and use. Teaching kids with autism social and communication skills can be done through the use of autism resources such as social skills stories.

 

Many parents worry and ask questions about how autism will affect my family. There is no set of rules or magic wand anyone can wave, but there a tried and tested treatments and therapies which have been used for may years by other families and professionals that are involved in the care and well being of kids with autism.


Such treatments and therapies like the autism resources available through sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com have become a valuable autism resource.


These sites are run by dedicated experts in autism and other pervasive developmental disorders and have good customer support as well as information and excellent professionally written social skills stories.

 

These answer the question how will autism affect my family - By providing the answer to how will I cope with teaching and re-enforcing to my child everyday living skills, activities, events, situations and circumstances.

 

Using autism resources such as social stories for autism children, you can teach your child basic skills such as tooth brushing, bedtime, changing clothes etc. As well as other skills such as shopping, buying new shoes, using the telephone, visiting grand parents and so on; all these skills which we take for granted but can be a nightmare for an autistic child, can now be taught efficiently making those tasks like shopping and bedtime more bearable.

 

Download over 100 social stories for autism children immediately from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Tips on grand parenting an autistic child

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009


A diagnosis of autism can rock the foundations of any family regardless of race, color or religion.

 

After the initial shock of receiving a diagnosis of autism a grandparent can be left feeling stressed and frustrated, even helpless. These emotions are all normal, a diagnosis of autism is never going to be an easy thing to hear or accept.

 

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting the brain of the individual the characteristics of autism are: autistic social skills deficits in social, communication both verbal and non-verbal as well as imagination and interaction skills.

 

These characteristics of autism or autistic social skills deficits are common to all autistic children. However the degree of autistic social skills deficits will vary as no two children are the same.

 

A lot of parents will look to grandparents for support at this stressful time and grandparents can often feel helpless with little or no answers or information to hand.

 

So where do you look for tips on grand parenting an autistic child that will be beneficial to the whole family?


The first place you may want to begin looking is right here on the internet. There are now lots of well stocked and expertly run sites offering great tips on grand parenting an autistic child as well as support, information and resources.

 

One resource often used by grandparents of autistic children is social stories for autism. This resource was first developed almost twenty years ago to help teach and support social skills and behaviors to autistic children.

 

Unlike typically developing children autistic children do not learn social skills naturally and need encouragement and direct teaching for even the most common of skills such as tooth brushing or asking questions.

 

Therefore parents, teachers and grandparents of autistic children use autistic resources like social stories for autism to teach and re-enforce skills like these and others. Used widely in various settings social stories for autism can help build confidence and life skills appropriate to the autistic child’s age and abilities.

 

Generally speaking all children need a certain amount of social skills to enter nursery, preschool and school etc. These skills can be taught through social stories for autism. Written by experts social stories describe the skill being taught in language and pictorial format in such a way the autistic child can relate too and understand.

 

Research and studies prove autistic kids are generally visual learners and will respond better to image and pictorial cues and prompts.

 

The social stories for autism that are on offer on sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com have been designed to embrace this concept all written by experts in autistic behaviors and social skills these social stories for autism offer the perfect answer.


The internet offers support and tips on grand parenting an autistic child on sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com this site is run by experts in autism all the social stories are written in the first person, pictorially rich and are for immediate download. There are 100 social stories for autistic kids teaching skills such as tooth brushing, getting a haircut, going to the toilet, looking after a pet, even stories such as buying new shoes.

 

Social stories for autistic kids can be used for various social skills, and situations that autistic kids can struggle to understand or that cause stress and anxiety.

 

Get immediate downloads on social stories for autistic kids from sites such as:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Resources used by parents to help children with autism

Tuesday, September 1st, 2009


Autism is a pervasive developmental order of the individual’s brain. The characteristics of autism are distinguished by a collection of symptoms known as autistic social skills deficits or triad of autistic impairments; rather than one solitary symptom.

 

The main characteristics of autism are social, communication both verbal and non-verbal; imagination and interaction deficits -  autistic social skills deficits. These autistic social skills deficits will be present in all children with autism.

 

A major issue reported by parents of children with autism is their child’s social and communication difficulties. Generally these social impairments become apparent during childhood and will continue into adulthood.


Generally kids with autism will smile less, avoid eye contact may be unresponsive to their own name, may have been a non-cuddly baby. Generally in kids with autism their speech may be delayed, sound odd or may not develop at all. They may shun cuddles and being touched, prefer their own company and have developed some form of repetitive behavior and or obsession.

 

At first a diagnosis of autism will be a shock; your GP will be able to guide you towards early intervention programs and expert advice.


After diagnosis of autism the parents of children with autism will need support as well as access to resources used by parents to help children with autism learn the appropriate social, communication and behavior skills they need.


In recent studies it was revealed that the parents of children with autism were amongst the highest group of individuals to receive help for stress related illnesses and problems.


Fortunately the internet now makes life slightly easier for those parents of autistic kids; by helping them to find appropriate resources used by other parents of kids with autism as well as support groups and information.

 

One such site offering information and autism resources to help parents of autistic kids find methods of coping with autistic social skills deficits is http://www.autismsocialstories.com


This site is dedicated to supporting parents of autistic kids in their quest to find appropriate autism resources such as social skills stories written by experts to help them teach and re-enforce appropriate skills and behaviors to their autistic child.

 

Like typically developing children the autistic child will need a certain amount of social skills before entering school especially if the parent opts for mainstream education for their autistic child.


Therefore teaching your autistic child social skills in necessary, not only for school but for all daily life activities, events and situations.

 

The internet is an excellent tool used by parents of children with autism to find appropriate methods and tools that are used affectively in schools and by other parents for teaching social skills to their autistic child.

 

For resources used by parents to help children with autism such as social skills stories visit any of the following sites:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school