Archive for the ‘children with autistic spectrum disorder’ Category

Autistic behaviour issues using social stories

Thursday, September 16th, 2010

Children with an autistic spectrum disorder can have behavioural difficulties regardless of their age and ability.

 

The autism spectrum is an umbrella for a range of autistic disorders from low functioning autism to High functioning autism and Asperger disorder.

 

Although combined by autistic characteristics the abilities of each individual will vary depending on where a child falls on the autism spectrum.

 

Many of the symptoms associated with autistic spectrum disorder can lead to behavioural difficulties.

 

Typically children with an autistic spectrum disorder will have difficulties socialising and communicating with others. For example typical autistic characteristics can include: displaying symptoms of withdrawal, the use of odd or inappropriate language, have unusual preoccupations, use repetitive stereotypical movements, have unusual routines, habits and behaviours.

 

Research suggests parents, teachers and other professionals use social skills stories to improve the social functioning and behaviour of children with autism.

 

Social stories are visual strategies that describe skills and situations in terms of social cues and appropriate responses.

 

Social skills stories can be individualized to suit the needs and abilities of the individual on the spectrum. The social skills story can be used to help children with autism learn appropriate social and communication skills.

 

The goal of the social skills story for children with autism should be to help pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.

 

To learn more about how to help autistic behaviour issues using social stories visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com.behavior

 

These social stories are visual strategies written in first person language from the point of view of the autistic individual and will help solve to solve autistic behaviour issues using social stories as the answer.

Other appropriate social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder

Friday, September 10th, 2010

Social skills stories are used to teach social skills through the use o visual images and first person text. Social skills stories work by describing visually in a concise manner any situation or skill that the child with ASD is finding difficult to master or understand.

Social stories teach social skills.

A social skills story is introduced to help a child with ASD understand everyday situations from the child’s own perspective.

For example a social skills story can help the ASD child prepare for changes to routine, cope with recess, assembly, visiting the dentist, going shopping and so on.

The goal or main idea behind using social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder is to help the ASD child feel more confident with the situation or skill, giving the a chance to become familiar with the situation before hand a rehearsal of what to expect and how to deal with it.

Each social skills story uses a set pattern of sentence type: Descriptive, Perspective, Directive and Control sentence in a predefined formula first developed twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

Nowadays social stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder are not purely used as a means of communication; they are used as a role model for skills, behaviours and situations that an autistic child may find confusing and troublesome.

Social stories can be used in schools, college, work, home and while out and about. Social stories are normally always visual children with autistic spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Therefore social stories teaching a skill or behaviour should be visual the ASD child will find the information in the social skills story easier to understand when it is visual.

Social stories to teach social skills should use first person language are consistent and easy to implement. Parents and teachers need no formal training to use social stories.

To find out more about social stories and gain downloads of 100 social skills stories for children with autistic spectrum disorder visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com Where you may gain access to editable, printable, expertly written stories.

Or 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Visual Supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder

Wednesday, January 27th, 2010

Unlike their typically developing peers children with autism spectrum disorder will display deficits in social and communication skills, this is common in ASD.

 

As typically developing individuals we naturally use communication both verbal and non-verbal, we are able to use expression and body language to show how we feel, what we are thinking and so on. For those children with autism spectrum disorder this ability is lacking.

 

Generally we learn social and communication skills through our environment, peers and family, we use these skills in our everyday lives. For children with autism spectrum disorder using expression and body language is not a natural act. For the majority of children with ASD social and communication skills need direct teaching and nurturing.

 

For children with ASD the world around them is confusing this is due to their deficits in social and communication skills. Being unable to communicate effectively can cause stress and confusion, it is common for children with ASD to become agitated and stressed easily when they can not express themselves or make their needs known.

 

Generally using visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder can help overcome a lot of the deficits in social and communication skills.


Endorsed by parents, care givers and teachers visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder can be implemented quickly and easily helping to overcome a lot of the struggles met by both families and for children with ASD.

 

Generally children with autism are visual learners which make visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder ideal. Therefore using visual supports such as social stories has become significant in the treatment of deficits in social and communication skills.

 

These short almost comic like visual step by step plans for skills and behaviors are always written in the first person following a specific formula.

 

Which was first introduced almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her find and teach social and communication skills to the children with autism spectrum disorder that she was working with.

 

Research shows us that children with ASD respond very well to the pictorial representation in social stories. Images and pictures are powerful re-enforcers for children with autism spectrum disorder, and as such are probably the most significant resource used for teaching appropriate social and communication skills.

 

Visual supports such as social stories for autism are implemented to help with any social and communication skill or behavior that the child with ASD is struggling to master.


Social stories can be used at home and in the classroom with great affect they can be used on their own or with other social stories for autism. To find out more about this valuable autism tool and to gain immediate download visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find 100 social stories for autism all for immediate download that will become useful visual supports and cues for children with autistic spectrum disorder

 

Visit and download social stories at:  www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or the following site:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

 

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

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In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


Children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

Sensory issues are common in children with autistic spectrum disorder. Generally children with autistic spectrum disorder have sensory issues, which can make them either highly sensitive or under responsive to sensory stimulation such as sound, light, smell, taste and touch as well as other stimulation through their senses.


Sensory issues can take different forms and will vary between children for example: some children with autistic spectrum disorder may overreact and become anxious, scared even experience pain at certain sounds for example a bell (like the ring of the telephone) or siren, but will talk very loudly when speaking with other people.

 

Children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues may sometimes object to certain materials like rough-textured clothing on their skin or labels on the inside their clothes.

 

Sometimes children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues may only want to eat certain foods and may dislike certain textures of foods.

 

Some children with autistic spectrum disorder and sensory issues can tolerate hugging but will become irritated and defensive when touched softly. This is sometimes referred to as “tactile defensiveness” which can make this set of autistic children appear disinterested in other people even their own parents, physical contact can make this set of autistic children irritated rather than consoled.

 

Generally all autistic children will have some form of sensory issue, parents can now make a difference to their child’s behavior using something called social skills stories.

 

For example some autistic kids are sensitive to sound, as shown above. Teachers have reported some autistic kids fear fire drills (sound) and that using social skills stories; for fire drills has been a huge bonus, helping keep autistic children calm, explaining to them what the fire alarm is why it is used and appropriate behaviors expected of them when the fire drill sounds.

 

Social skills stories are used for a wide range of sensory issues that affect autistic children both in the home and at school. Parents and teachers report significant improvements in autistic sensory issues once social skills stories are introduced.

 

Social skills stories are generally written by experts and are visually rich, as autistic kids tend to be visual learners and will respond better to visual supports and cues. They will always use first person appropriate language and will follow focus on the key points being addressed by the social skills story.

There are many sites on the internet offering parents and teacher the opportunity to download social skills stories to help with autistic sensory issues, one such site with stories such as fire drills is www.autismsocialstories.com/school


Other sites with social skills stories on various issues relating to children with autism and autistic sensory issues are:

 


www.autismsocialstories.com