Archive for the ‘social skills stories for autism’ Category

A diagnosis of autism

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?
a diagnosis of autism Autism Spectrum Disorder is possibly one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Receiving a diagnosis of autism for your child is not easy. Typically a child with autism will have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” these are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child. The child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

Typically children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism will probably lack this normal instinct and will need direct instruction for social and communication skills.

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

There is however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers and so on, which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

Social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

The use of autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum has been proven to work.

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language the social skills story will help explain the why, what, where and when and how to the child with autism.

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com where you can download various social skills stories for autism

What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Autism Spectrum Disorder is probably one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Your child receiving a diagnosis of autism is probably going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will certainly have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” which are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Typically children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child the child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

 

Normally developing children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers etc. which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

As a general rule all parents, teachers, guardians, teachers and care givers use autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum.

 

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language always from the child’s point of view, using first person text and visually rich social stories for autism explain the why, what, where and when and how to the autism child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and obtain info and downloads of various social skills stories for autism

Social Skills Stories for Autism Printables

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

Social Skills Stories for Autism help to improve the social skills of children on the autism spectrum by using short descriptive social skills stories to help them interpret challenging or confusing social situations and behaviors.

Social skills stories have a specifically defined style and format, which was developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

They describe a situation, skill or behavior in terms of the relevant social cues, the perspective of others, and will normally suggest appropriate responses and behaviors.

Generally Social Skills Stories for Autism are short descriptive pieces of text with visual images detailing the relevant social cues in any given situation. They break down the behavior or social skill into easier to understand steps by omitting irrelevant information.

The social skills story should be descriptive and visual to show children with autism how they can cope with and understand the behavior, skill or situation the social skills story is detailing

It should also include answers to the questions who, what, when, where, and why and HOW through the use of visuals and short pieces of written text, as well offer an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is an area of marked weakness for most children on the autism spectrum.

Social Skills Stories for Autism printables are editable and can be downloaded from sites offering Social Skills Stories for Autism such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Generally teachers and parents of autistic children use Social Skills Stories for Autism Printables to teach all social skills their child with autism is struggling with for example social story using the bathroom, hygiene issues, transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills and adjusting behaviors in fact all social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors can be dealt with using Social Skills Stories for Autism printables.

To download social skills stories for your child with autism visit the above or any of the following sites:


http://www.autismcoialstories.com/school

http://www.autismscoialstories.com/school_resources

After a diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Autism is probably one of the most frequent developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born getting a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be testing to accept, the autism child will undoubtedly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically budding children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The autistic child lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents describe after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their autistic child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Sensory Issues with Autism

Monday, October 11th, 2010

Sensory sensitivity can lead to behavioural problems, difficulties with coordination, and many other issues for children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

A child with autism spectrum disorder will have marked difficulties managing sensory input, they may over-react to taste, touch, feel, light or noise.

Sometimes children with autism spectrum disorder use repetitive stereotypical movements and autistic behaviours such as stimming.  Many may feel the need to flick their fingers, bang their heads, even slam against furniture or twirl in circles, these autistic behaviours are due to sensory sensitivity, with the child with autism spectrum disorder being either hyper or hypo sensitive.

There is no outright cure for sensory sensitivity, but there are ways to help your child manage some of these difficulties.

Gather information about sensory sensitivity and how you can help your child with autism, for example: Children with hyperactive sensory systems will typically avoid activities that involve movement, while children that have hypoactive sensory systems will seek out activities that involve movement.

Therefore a child on the spectrum that with hyperactive sensory systems may hide under their covers, or bury their head into cushions, while a child on the spectrum with a hypoactive sensory systems may use stimming or repetitive stereotypical movements such as rocking or twirling.

Some children with autism may feel the need to continually flush the toilet, eat only one type of food, or continuously repeat themselves; these kinds of sensory difficulties can be eased using social skills stories.

Social skills stories are short descriptive pieces of text used to help the child with autism understand a behaviour or skill that they may be struggling with. Generally children with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures.

Using this concept, social skills stories for autism are visual, using images and or pictures to describe the activity, behaviour or skill in a manner the child on the spectrum can understand.

Acting as a visual plan, framework of role made the social skills story answers the ever important “wh” questions, who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.

Social skills stories for autism must be editable as no two children on the spectrum are ever the same and their abilities and needs will differ as with any child. Social skills stories need to be convenient to use therefore they should be printable, colourful and easy to personalize.

To find out more about how social skills stories for autism can be used to help with certain sensory difficulties in autistic children visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

Other general everyday and school, social stories can be found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialtories.com/preschool

 

 

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Social skills training for autism

Friday, September 3rd, 2010

For the vast majority of autistic individuals the “everyday or normal” communication and social challenges they face can cause stress and anxieties.


Many children with autism experience difficulty with aspects of social interactions and communication. This is referred to as social skills deficits, this means the ASD child has impaired abilities in certain aspects for example they will struggle to relate to their peers and form or maintain friendships.


Methods such as social skills stories for autism can be used to overcome many of the hurdles autistic individuals face on an almost daily bases with social and communication difficulties.


A common difficulty shared by the majority of children with autism is to make inappropriate remarks (communication difficulties) or behave in socially unacceptable ways with little awareness of the social implications of these behaviours.


Social skills stories can help by not asking the ASD child to change inappropriate social behaviours. Instead, social skills stories work by visually showing the ASD child an alternative communication or socially acceptable skill or alternative social strategies.


Used as a means of communication and social skills training for autism, social skills stories are easy to implement and use, they need no formal training, can be printed, edited and personalized to suit individuals own specific needs.


Social skills stories are used as a role model for appropriate behaviours. Generally most autistic individuals will be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images and pictures. Therefore, using visual supports for autism is by far the best option. This visual strategy is implemented in social skills stories for autism, appropriate visual images are used with first person text as a visual plan of the skill, situation, task or communication difficulties the ASD child may be struggling with.


Research suggests visual supports for autism can be beneficial in social skills training for autism. By using a visual strategy children with autism can better understand skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted such as making friends, washing our teeth, respecting personal space, asking questions and so on.


To learn more about social skills stories for autism and how they may benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders. Research suggests that 1 in every 150 children born will receive a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no known cure for autism.


For many families a diagnosis of autism is devastating, however this need not be the case. Autism Spectrum Disorder is common and there are various methods and treatments of autism available. For most families after a diagnosis of autism has been given Early Intervention is probably going to be the most useful, this will help address the child’s social skills deficits.

 

So what are social skills deficits?  Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. Meaning the autistic child will have social and communication difficulties, social skills deficits are characteristically deficits with:

Social skills

Communication difficulties

Imagination difficulties

And Interaction skills

 

Social skills deficits are quite often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “Theory of mind”.

 

Typically developing children have a natural ability to recognize and read other peoples thoughts and feelings for example as typically developing individuals we would recognize a frown as a sign of confusion or unhappiness, and a smile as a sign of pleasure or happiness. This ability to recognize the feelings and emotions of others is missing with autism.


Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

A lack of social skills, their social skills deficits, can make it hard for the autistic child to interact socially and many parents fear their autistic child will struggle with friendships and social situations.

 

There are various treatments of autism which are available to parents over the internet, which HELP to address the social skills deficits and communication difficulties that are displayed by an autistic child, such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers can use social skills stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children with autism spectrum disorder.


Social stories are normally written by experts, using appropriate first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic child. Social stories use visual images to help the child with autism spectrum disorder understand what is expected of them and in return what they can expect. Social skills stories for autism answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism spectrum disorder feel more comfortable with and in situations they may struggle to master or understand, which will cut back on negative behaviors.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Social stories autism

Monday, March 8th, 2010

Social stories are used to help children and adults with ASD (Autistic spectrum disorders) understand and cope with social and communication skills and behaviours they would otherwise struggle to master.

Social stories autism work by breaking down a task or social situation into small easy to understand steps, the social cues.  Normally social skills stories will include visual images or photographs that are relevant to the story. Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, which means they find visual information easier to digest and understand.

Therefore many parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals find social stories for autism an ideal tool when communicating and caring for autistic individuals.

By implementing a social story you can help children and adults with ASD master skills and behaviours they struggle with such as: visiting a dentist, recess, asking questions, respecting boundaries and so on. Daily life skills as well as more complex situations can be broken down into relative social cues, with appropriate images, then by following a specific formula of 4 main sentence types the social story can be implemented that will help target the situation, skill or behaviour.

Social stories are a framework of visual representations and appropriate first person language of a skill. That will not only help those with autistic spectrum disorders, but also other children and adults with related conditions.

To find out more about social skills stories and how they can be downloaded and implemented to help children with ASD and related conditions visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find information on social skills stories and downloads of 100 social skills stories that are all written by an expert in childhood autism.

For many children with ASD social and communication skills are difficult to master, but using social skills stories for autism can help put an end to much of the stress and anxieties they feel.

Get immediate download of social skills stories for autism and related conditions from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

OR 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Social story on hygiene and autism

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Social stories are used to help teach social skills to autistic people. First developed almost twenty years ago social stories follow a set pattern which is easy for autistic people to understand.

 

Always written in the first person and visually rich with appropriate text, the social story will describe the skill or behavior the autistic child may be struggling to understand in an easy to follow step by step plan with visual images.

 

Generally children with autism struggle to understand social and communication skills, which the rest of us take for granted, for example hygiene skills such as eating habits, washing their teeth, hair and so on.


Therefore many parents of autistic children, care givers and educators implement social stories to help the autistic child comprehend and master the skill or behavior they are struggling with, this can ease anxieties and behavior issues.

 

As children with autism are generally visual learners social stories provide an excellent tool for parents of autistic children to use as they are visually rich, this helps the autistic child understand the social story far easier than the written word or an oral command or direction.

 

A common issue faced by parents of autistic children is their child’s lack of hygiene; many children with autism fail to understand the need for some hygiene skills and can be distressed by for example the sound the toilet makes, the taste of the toothpaste, visiting a dentist even getting a haircut can be stressful.

 

A social story on hygiene and autism, which can teach the appropriate hygiene skills, can ease stresses and anxieties.

 

To understand more about social skills stories for autism and how easy they can be implemented and used visit any of the following sites. Or for a specific social story on hygiene and autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


For all other social skills stories for autism that help to teach social skills to autistic people visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to the autism child ? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.


There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills and choose from various titles.