Archive for the ‘child with autism spectrum disorder’ Category

Autism Spectrum Disorder and social skills stories

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

A social story is written to help a person with Autism Spectrum Disorder address social skills deficits and pave the way for a positive social interaction or behaviour.

 

Children on the spectrum do not naturally acquire social and communication skills and lack he ability to interact with others effectively, this is due to social skills deficits. Social skills need to be taught directly through deliberate treatments and intervention strategies.

 

Teaching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills using intervention strategies

 

Probably the most significant of the various intervention strategies are social skills stories. Social skills stories can be easily implemented and used to teach the social and communication skills and behaviours that the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder is struggling with.

 

Having social impairments is much like being dropped in a foreign country with no idea where or how to get home or communicate. Children on the spectrum will need intervention strategies to acquire functional and age-appropriate social skills, make friendships, and learn communication skills.

 

We know that the vast majority of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures, therefore visual intervention strategies are excellent.

 

Visual intervention strategies

 

Social stories ARE visual intervention strategies. Written in first person text and using visual images and pictures to describe the situation or skill in detail, a social skills story break the skill into appropriate social cues, following a set formula the social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation for the person with an Autism Spectrum Disorder to follow.

 

Social skills stories provide concrete information on what people in a given situation are doing, thinking or feeling. The social skills story is like a visual plan showing the steps or sequence of events, identifying the significant social cues and their meaning, answering the important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why

 

For a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder social stories should describe social situations, contexts, and the likely behaviours of others and provide an appropriate behavioural response cue that the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder can understand.

 

Therefore teaching children with Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills using intervention strategies LIKE social stories is beneficial.

 

For children with Autism Spectrum Disorder social skills stories act as a VISUAL PLAN OR FRAMEWORK that helps children with autism understand skills and behaviours that they struggle with.

 

To learn more about children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and social stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Motivating an ASD student

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

Motivating an ASD student can be at times stressful and difficult. A student with ASD WILL NOT process information in the same manner as a typically developing student, this means that the student with ASD may think, act, re-act and behave very differently to the other students.

A child with autism spectrum WILL almost certainly have deficits in three main areas of development: social, communication (verbal and non-verbal) and imagination. These deficits can make teaching difficult.

There are various supports which CAN be used to HELP a child with autism spectrum cope and better understand skills and situations that they may or are struggling with.

Motivating an ASD student using visual supports like social skills stories, picture communication cards and flash cards is beneficial.

These visual supports for the ASD student can be easily implemented and are readily available from sites like

http://www.autimsocialstories.com/school

 Typically social skills stories ARE short descriptive pieces of text which look almost like a comic script conversation. The social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The social story should always be written from the point of view of the ASD student and use first person text, it should always adopt a manner that the child with autism can relate to and better understand.

Generally social skills stories ARE visually rich using images and pictures to help explain to the child with autism spectrum what’s happening and why.

The social story should be editable as no two children with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore editing is often needed.

For more information on social skills stories for students with autism and communication cards please visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Where you will find immediate downloads of social skills stories for students with autism and related conditions.

General social stories can be downloaded from

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder

Thursday, February 16th, 2012

As with typically developing children every child with autism spectrum disorder is going to be different, with their own unique set of needs and abilities.

But unlike typically developing children a child on the autism spectrum WILL struggle to naturally learn social awareness skills and behaviours.

Autism is a neurological disorder which affects how the child on the spectrum processes information, thinks, acts, re-acts and behaves. These deficits ARE common to autism and are generally referred to as social skills deficits.

Although there is no cure for autism there ARE some very GOOD resources that can help. For example: Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder like social skills stories, communication picture cards, flash cards and PECS.

Probably the most significant resource for teaching kids with ASD ARE social skills stories. These were first developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill, situation or behaviour that the child on the spectrum is struggling with.

Typically the vast majority of kids with ASD WILL have problems with social awareness skills, therefore social stories ARE implemented to help overcome these difficulties.

A social skills story WILL act like a visual framework or plan of the skill the child on the autism spectrum needs help with or is finding stressful – like for example making friends, asking questions, sharing and so on…

The social skills story WILL give exact information in a manner that the child on the autism spectrum CAN understand and always from the child’s own perspective, using first person text.

Visual images/pictures ARE a strong means of communication for ALL children with autism as they tend to be mainly VISUAL thinkers and learners, this makes social skills stories ideal.

Social skills stories for children with autism spectrum disorder WILL also answer the ever so important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “how” and WILL also offer the child an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness on most kids with ASD.

Resources that can help teach social awareness skills to child with autism spectrum disorder such as social skills stories CAN be viewed at http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will be able to gain immediate downloads of around 100 social skills stories.

These social stories may be edited and need NO formal training to use. We all use different terminology with our children therefore social stories need to be editable as well as printable so that they may be taken to wherever the child needs the help.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

Motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder

Monday, June 7th, 2010

Motivating a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder is not going to be easy. By definition a child with autism will almost certainly have a restricted repertoire of interests and skills as well as difficulties with social interactions, imagination and communication skills.

Many parents will struggle to teach social and communication skills to their child. But without planned, positive experiences, and resources that are designed to help teach appropriate skills and behaviors many children with ASD often become victimized by their autism as they age.

Strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder should include visual supports such as social skills stories, PECS and  flash cards.

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder tend to be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images or pictures, which makes understanding oral or written instruction or information difficult for them.

Therefore motivating a child with autism spectrum disorder is better achieved when visual supports are implemented. Many strategies that support motivation for individuals who have Autism Spectrum Disorder are now available from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Parents do not need any formal training to use social skills stories or flash cards, these visual strategies are easy to implement and used successfully both in the home and classroom.

Social skills stories are probably one of the major tools used to help teach and motivate children with autism spectrum disorder. Since their development twenty years ago social stories have grown in popularity and are now readily used by parents, teachers and professionals caring for special needs kids with autism and related conditions.

Developed by therapist Carol Gray social stories are short visual strategies that detail skills and situations the child with autism is struggling to master or understand. Using visual images and first person text the social story acts as a role model or visual plan answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) as well as giving the child with autism an insight into how others are thinking and feeling.

 

To learn more about how a social story could help your child visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find detailed information on social stories and how they can be used to teach and motivate children with autism.

 

Other sites of interest include:

 

Flash cards can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

ASD – Autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

With an increase in the number of children being diagnosed with ASD, it is now recognized that autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than disorders such as diabetes, spina bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children diagnosed with ASD will have common symptoms of autism; these are known as social skills deficits or the triad of impairments.  A child’s social skills deficits are characterized by difficulties in:


Social skills development

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills


These deficits are always present in children with ASD to varying degrees.


In addition to the triad of impairments or social skills deficits children diagnosed with ASD may also display sensory processing issues.


Probably the most noticeable of the symptoms of autism is an individual’s difficulty with social interactions. A child with autism spectrum disorder may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.


Typically a child with autism spectrum disorder will not follow the normal pattern of development. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before their child is diagnosed with ASD.

 

For example from birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case.

 

Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication both verbal and non-verbal can prove difficult for ASD children.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder will never develop speech, or speech may be delayed. Generally all individuals on the spectrum are visual thinkers and learners and benefit form visual aids that can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For many children with autism spectrum disorder using visual aids that teach social and communication skills such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories are proving very beneficial.


For the vast majority of individuals with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct. For example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autism spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Consequently, many children with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching is achievable by using visual aids like social stories. Since their development twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used for teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills in children with autism and related conditions today.

 

Social stories are a role model that provide individuals with ASD a visual explanation in the form of a script, much like a step by step visual representation or plan of the skill or situation that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with an ASD.


Giving the individual with ASD accurate information that answers the “wh” questions
(who, where, why, when and what)
as well as giving an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior.

 

Social stories will help reduce anxieties and stress making them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autism spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders. Research suggests that 1 in every 150 children born will receive a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no known cure for autism.


For many families a diagnosis of autism is devastating, however this need not be the case. Autism Spectrum Disorder is common and there are various methods and treatments of autism available. For most families after a diagnosis of autism has been given Early Intervention is probably going to be the most useful, this will help address the child’s social skills deficits.

 

So what are social skills deficits?  Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. Meaning the autistic child will have social and communication difficulties, social skills deficits are characteristically deficits with:

Social skills

Communication difficulties

Imagination difficulties

And Interaction skills

 

Social skills deficits are quite often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “Theory of mind”.

 

Typically developing children have a natural ability to recognize and read other peoples thoughts and feelings for example as typically developing individuals we would recognize a frown as a sign of confusion or unhappiness, and a smile as a sign of pleasure or happiness. This ability to recognize the feelings and emotions of others is missing with autism.


Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

A lack of social skills, their social skills deficits, can make it hard for the autistic child to interact socially and many parents fear their autistic child will struggle with friendships and social situations.

 

There are various treatments of autism which are available to parents over the internet, which HELP to address the social skills deficits and communication difficulties that are displayed by an autistic child, such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers can use social skills stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children with autism spectrum disorder.


Social stories are normally written by experts, using appropriate first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic child. Social stories use visual images to help the child with autism spectrum disorder understand what is expected of them and in return what they can expect. Social skills stories for autism answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism spectrum disorder feel more comfortable with and in situations they may struggle to master or understand, which will cut back on negative behaviors.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Treatment for autism

Wednesday, April 21st, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder, and as yet there is still no known cure for autism, however there are many treatments.

 

Some help manage the symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorder, while others address the social, behavioural and communication difficulties associated with this pervasive developmental disorder. Of all the available autism treatments any claiming to be a cure for autism is simply not so.

 

There are many different theories surrounding the “cause of autism” and as yet no one theory has proven conclusive, research into the cause of autism and the symptoms of autism is still on-going.

 

There are many different types of therapies and autism treatments developed specifically to alleviate symptoms of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world, with the available therapies and treatment for autism it is expected that children with autism have the opportunity to reach his or her full potential.

 

Probably one of the most significant treatment for autism is social stories, a social story will address communication difficulties help build social skills, interaction and imagination skills as well as encourage appropriate behaviours.

 

We all need a certain amount of social and communication skills to be able to function daily. With autism the ability to learn social and communication skills is missing, however using a treatment for autism like social stories this lack of naturally learnt skills and behaviours can be addressed successfully.


Typically developing children learn through the environment and their family and peers, the child with ASD wont, therefore direct teaching is necessary.  Using social stories as a strategy for improving and teaching social skills to your child with ASD is simple, no qualifications or formal training is needed, social stories are simple to use and very effective.

 

The symptoms of autism vary between individuals, however all autistic’s tend to be visual thinkers and learners. Therefore social stories were developed to be visual, much like a visual framework of the skill or behaviour being addressed.

 

For many parents probably the most significant difficulty they struggle with is their child’s communication difficulties, for most children with autism language is confusing and often they do not understand what is expected of them. Much like if you were dropped in a foreign country, chances are you would not understand what people were saying, however if they showed you a picture chances are you would catch on pretty fast. This is the same with autism visual images and pictures trigger understanding much quicker that the spoken or written word.

 

 

For example a parent struggling to make their child understand may talk more trying to explain, this is not going to work with a child with ASD, the answer is to talk less and use visual cues prompts. For example show them a picture of the toilet, dinner etc rather than speak they will understand a lot quicker and with less stress for the both of you.

 

Using social stories as a strategy uses this knowledge; a social story is a visual representation with minimal text, always in first person language that describes the skill or behaviour from the point of view of the autistic individual.

 

The social story breaks the situation down into small pieces and each piece of the skill for example going to recess is represented by an image and text describing the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) as well as what the child with ASD may expect from others and what they will expect back from them. This will help the autistic individual feel more comfortable and in control which will reduce anxieties and stress.

 

To learn more about this treatment for autism and how using social stories as a strategy can help your child with ASD visit any of the following sites:


http://www.autismsocialstories.com

ASD social stories

Sunday, February 21st, 2010

ASD social stories are used as a tool when teaching social and communication skills to children with ASD. Social stories were first developed around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray as a tool to help her communicate and teach the autistic children she was working with.

ASD social stories provide the child with ASD explanations and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing due to their individual autism symptom.

ASD social stories are used by parents of autistic children and teachers to effectively teach social and communication skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Social stories use visual cues that show the child with ASD what is expected of them as well as what they can expect.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder have social skills impairments; it is due to these social skills impairments that a child with ASD has difficulties with social and communication skills and behaviors.

As with typically developing children no two autistic children will ever be the same and therefore the severity of autism symptom will vary. ASD social stories can be adapted to suit individual needs and abilities.

Research shows us that teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder has been identified as one of the best indicators of positive long-term outcomes in the child’s development.

Consequently, parents of autistic children and teachers use tools such as social stories to teach and re-enforce social skills. The social skills story will help the child with autism identify the important cues in a given situation.

The social skills story will show the child with ASD visually possible outcomes, giving focus to the key points, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

It will also explain rules, routines, situations, upcoming events or abstract concepts; and how the child with autism spectrum disorder can understand expectations, cope with changes to routines and learn appropriate skills and behaviors.

ASD social stories use a specifically defined style and format. They are mainly written by experts in autism and are usually visually rich. Most children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners making visual social skills stories an ideal teaching tool.

Many parents and teachers as well as professionals use social skills stories for autistic children to teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download ASD social skills stories for autistic children on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autimsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Strategies for festive fun for children with autism

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

The festive season need not be stress filled and full of anxieties for both you and your autistic child.


Following some simple strategies can help alleviate some of the pressures and confusions an autistic child feels this time of year. Using social stories as a strategy can greatly improve Christmas for an autistic child.


Probably one of the major issues related to Christmas for an autistic child is the confusion and changes to routine. All autistic people like routine and things to remain the same, which of cause is impossible in the festive season.


Consequently stress and anxieties are displayed which can lead to autistic behaviors such as aggression or meltdowns. To avoid or limit autistic behaviors many parents of children with autism implement specifically written social stories aimed at helping the child with autism cope with changes to routines and other social and communication skills that need altering or learning or re-enforcing this time of year.


For example putting up a Christmas tree, a child with autism spectrum disorder lives in a very literal world and can be confused as to why a tree is decorated and placed in the house! A simple social story can help explain why this happens and help the child with autism spectrum disorder participate in the decorating of the tree.

 

Research suggests using social stories as strategies for festive fun for children with autism can help encourage positive behaviors, which will help the entire family enjoy the festive season more.


Mainly written by experts social stories are visually rich with appropriate text following a specific formula, explaining in a step by step plan how to cope with or master a skill the autistic child is struggling with. A simple social story can help reduce negative behavior and alleviate stress.

 

To download social stories as strategies for festive fun for children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

Autistic spectrum and sensory issues

Sunday, August 9th, 2009

You will probably have come across sensory integration or sensory processing disorder and autism if you have a child with autism spectrum disorder.

 

These conditions are normally associated with children on the spectrum because they suffer with sensory deficits. Children with autism spectrum disorder have trouble processing sensory input for example they are normally either over sensitive or under sensitive.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder will have problems managing sensory input which will often result in over reactions which can make participation in social activities difficult, or will result in anxiety and stress for the child with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Children with autism can be over sensitive to light, sound, feel, touch and smell making life difficult. These sensitivities can result in the child being unable to perform certain tasks for example they may be sensitive to the taste of toothpaste or the lights in a shop, maybe the feel of the car seats and so on..


In some cases a GP may diagnose sensory processing disorder and autism. However this is not always the case most autistic children will have sensitivities, these can be controlled and eased without medication in a lot of cases by using supports such as social stories for autism.


Social stories can help children with autistic spectrum and sensory issues, for example maybe your child is over sensitive to the feel of the cold metal in their mouth at the dentist, appropriate social stories for autism and going to the dentist can help alleviate the anxiety a trip to the dentist can bring on, helping to make the experience less fraught and stressful.


Or maybe your child with autistic spectrum and sensory issues is having difficulties with flushing the chain or other sensory difficulties, using social stories for autism can benefit the child and help make them more relaxed with the situation.


To download appropriate social stories and learn more about how they can help an autistic child with sensory issues as well as teach social skills and behaviors visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens