Archive for the ‘parents of autistic children’ Category

Autism goals for interaction

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; this can affect how the person with autism spectrum thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

 

Autism impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Typically kids with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on Autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism spectrum disorder and social skills should be taught directly.

 

Generally kids with autism spectrum disorder rare visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; this is achievable using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism spectrum disorder overcome social interaction difficulties.

 

To find appropriate Autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

What is it like to be autistic?

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

There are very few physical signs of autism spectrum disorder. So what is it like to be autistic? Imagine being left in a foreign country alone, unable to speak the language, unable to read the signs or gestures of others. Your senses have become super sensitive, and you have nowhere to turn to for help.


This is how the world appears for many autistic children. Our ever changing and fast moving world can trigger anxiety attacks, confusion and stress for those with autism spectrum disorder.


Parents of autistic children report anxieties. Although autism is being diagnosed more frequently with 1:4 being diagnosed autistic, still there is not a lot of information on autism. Parents of autistic children report difficulties such as having to get used to people thinking you are a bad parent that cannot control their child. Parents of kids with autism also report problems from doctors calling them an over-anxious parent, family members dismissing their child as a spoilt brat. Parents of kids with autism also find difficulties with friends, being shunned and not included in events because of their autistic child’s behaviours.


Having a child diagnosed autistic is not going to be easy, experts agree early intervention is beneficial.

 

Parents of kids with autism also agree that visual supports are a good idea, such as visual support cards, schedules, social stories and PECS communication systems.


All designed to help children with autism cope in an ever changing and confusing world. Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners meaning they think in images or pictures and will gain more help from visual strategies rather than spoken or text.

 

Implementing visual strategies can benefit children with autism greatly. For example many children with an ASD struggle with simple tasks such as tooth brushing, introducing social stories can help with this.


Social stories are short specific visual strategies, pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skills in terms of the relevant social cues. Using first person language with no frills, following a specific pattern social stories are visual strategies that are used to teach and re-enforce social and communication skills as well as give clear coping strategies for sensory processing issues and behaviour difficulties.


Much like a visual plan or role model a social skills story can answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of those around them.


So for example a social skills story for tooth brushing can teach children with an ASD why it is important to brush your teeth, how to brush your teeth and what the consequence of not brushing your teeth might be.


Teachers and parents with ASD children do not need any formal training to use social skills stories, they can be printed, personalized and edited to make them easy to implement and convenient.

 

ASD children respond well to visual strategies such as social skills stories, visual support cards, schedules and PECS.


For more information on visual supports such as social stories visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or for more information on visual support cards visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

Which resources to use with an autistic child

Friday, July 23rd, 2010

Autism is one of the most common developmental disorders yet still it is misunderstood.

Being the parent of an autistic child is one of the toughest challenges a parent can face. However with early diagnosis of autism, the challenges can be lessened.

Understanding which resources to use with an autistic child can be confusing, with so many treatments for autism available, many parents struggle to understand and decide which resources will best suit their own individual child.

Unfortunately, the symptoms of autism can be severe in some children with an ASD, some children with an ASD may never develop speech may have other educational difficulties and seizures. While other children with an ASD may have average or above average intelligence, although in most cases speech will be slow to develop.

Although there is nothing that can be done to reverse autism, therefore a diagnosis of autism is a lifelong disability. However there are strategies parents of autistic children can use to help with the symptoms of autism.

So which resources to use with an autistic child? What is available and how can you access them quickly and easily?

Generally being the parent of an autistic child can be isolating, frustrating and confusing. Many parents of autistic children use resources such as autism social skills stories, to help their child develop age appropriate skills and behaviours that their typically developing peers are learning naturally.

Studies into the behaviour patterns of children with autism show that most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners no matter which end of the autism scale they are on. This knowledge helps us determine which kind of resources may be needed to help children with autism learn skills and behaviours effectively.

Generally visual thinkers and learners will better understand information when it is presented visually through images, pictures, graphs etc rather that through written words or orally. For children with autism on either end of the autism scale visual representations and information is better received and understood.

Visual resources for children with autism are available from many sites like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  Visual resources for children with autism such as social skills stories can be implemented and used effectively to help show and teach children with an ASD appropriate skills and behaviours. For example social skills stories are used to help autistic children learn behaviours such as making friends, controlling negative behaviours, asking questions, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, using the toilet and so on.

Social skills stories are like a comic script, visual, colourful, use first person language, can be edited, printed and personalized. Social skills stories are like a role model detailing the skill or behaviour in appropriate language and images easy to use, follow and versatile, can be edited and convenient to use. Social skills stories are one of the most popular autism resources used today, and have great uses in the nursery, classroom, college, work place and at home or out and about they can be used in most situation the autistic child struggles with for example the dentist, a hospital visit, birthday party, school trip, wedding etc.

To find out more about social stories and there uses visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com or one of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autistic visual supports what are they?

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Visual supports are part of our everyday lives, we read newspapers, books, use the internet, watch TV, look at road maps, signs and so on. They are important, the vast majority of us rely on visual supports in our jobs, at school, college and so on, and many of us could not function as effectively without visual supports.

Visual supports can be used to help people with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions in much the same way.

Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore presenting information in a visual manner can help encourage and support the communication skills, language development, social skills development, encourage positive behaviours and the ability to process information in people with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition which affects a person’s ability in three main areas of development: social interactions, communication – verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills. This is often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments.

The triad of autistic impairments is found in all autistic individuals, but to varying degrees dependant on the individuals own level of development. There is no cure for autism, but there are various methods and treatments for autism available which can help people with autism spectrum address the triad of autistic impairments.

Having a lack of social interaction, communication and imagination skills can be confusing and lead to social isolation and even bullying in many cases. For children with autism it is vital that they are taught appropriate social, communication and imagination skills directly. This is achieved using treatments for autism like autistic visual supports.

So autistic visual supports what are they and where can you find them? There are various treatments for autism like social stories, PECS, flash cards, schedules, communication boards and so on all very good autistic visual supports and all readily available for most parents of autistic children.

The internet is the perfect place to begin looking for supports for children with autism, sites run by behaviour specialists, O.T.,  Language specialists, clinics and so on offer parents of autistic children the chance to order and download various autistic visual supports sometimes for free or for a small fee.

Probable one of the major visual supports for children with autism is social skills stories. A good source of social skills stories is found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are used to teach and encourage social interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours as well as address other difficulties that the person on the autism spectrum may be struggling with such as personal hygiene issues, school related difficulties and so on.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Using visual images and first person text the social skills story breaks the skill down into relevant social key points giving the person on the autism spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill making it more predictable, therefore reducing anxieties, confusion and stress.

 

Social skills stories are easy to edit; personalize and print making them convenient and easy to use. To find out more about autistic visuals supports what are they visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction

Monday, May 24th, 2010

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a neurological condition affecting an individuals social and communication development. ASD is characterized by the individual’s social impairments and ritualistic, obsessive behaviours.

 

A major issue in children with autism spectrum disorder is their communication difficulties, both verbal and nonverbal, these are common to ASD, and will affect how the ASD child interacts socially.


For an ASD child having communication difficulties can be stressful, often likened to being dropped in a foreign land with no conception of the language or customs.

 

Communication difficulties are common to ASD the child will have difficulties understanding verbal instruction and information, sarcasm, humour, wit and emotion etc. this lack of communication skill can often be misunderstood and may lead people to believe the child with ASD is rude or aloof.

 

The child with ASD may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.


Many children with autism spectrum disorder will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, will show little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

Autistic individual’s social impairments can impact on how the child with autism will interact with others. Consequently, Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction are based on the individuals strengths, which in most cases is visual.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in children with autism spectrum disorder, making it necessary to teach social skills and social and communication skills directly.

 

Generally children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means visual information and instruction is far easier for them to understand. This concept is used in social stories which teach social skills and deal with communication difficulties.

 

Using visual supports like social skills stories for autism make autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions much easier. Parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, and imagination and interaction skills such as asking question, making friends, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space and so on.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are today one of the major autism tools used to help children with autism overcome social interaction and communication difficulties.


To find appropriate autism tools such as autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions social skills stories on topics like making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

 

Autistic children in preschool

Tuesday, April 27th, 2010

Many parents of autistic children feel confused and helpless wondering how to communicate with their child and ensure their child has the opportunity to reach their full potential.


Research does suggest early intervention strategies for autistic children are beneficial, and that enrollment for autistic children in preschool can also help the child.

 

Your G.P. will be able to point you in the right direction with regard to early intervention strategies for autistic children.

 

Many parents of autistic children opt to place their child in mainstream preschool.  It is always a good idea to make an appointment to visit the preschool and discuss your child with the teacher to ensure she is aware of what autism is and that appropriate provisions are in place before your child begins.


If you are the teacher of an inclusive preschool a good place for you to start will be with the introduction of appropriate visual support tools for preschool children with autism. 


There are many visual support tools available today, with PECS, flash cards and social stories being among the most significant visual support tools for preschool children with autism that are available to you. All of which can now be sourced directly from the internet, as well as from OT and the speech therapist.

 

Using visual support tools for preschool children with autism do not need any form of formal training, sites offering good support and visual tools can be visited at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Personally we recommend the use of both flash cards and social stories combined. By placing visual supports like flash cards around the preschool you can help the preschool autistic infant quickly identify certain areas, for example a picture of the toilet above the bathroom allows the child to find the toilet without causing the stress and anxiety. This is repeated around preschool in areas the child will need to identify like the pencil tray, sink, coast pegs etc.

 

Social stories for the preschool autistic infant are short descriptive visual scripts used as a tool to teach and improve social and communication skills. The preschool autistic infant may have difficulties interacting in play, or understanding make believe, ask for a drink etc. A social story will help the child address these difficulties.

 

Social stories are much like a comic strip showing the skill or behavior in visual images with age appropriate text always in first person and from the child’s point of view.

 

To find out more about social stories for the preschool autistic infant visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

 

 

 

Social stories for children with ASD

Thursday, April 8th, 2010

Social Stories are used as a tool when teaching social and communication skills to children with ASD. Therapist Carol Gray first introduced the concept of social stories to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with.

Social stories for children with ASD provide the child with a visual representation and possible behavior suggestions for situations, skills and behaviors that they may find difficult or confusing.

ASD social stories are used by parents of autistic children and teachers to help improve social and communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorder. ASD Social stories use visual cues that show the child with ASD what is expected of them as well as what they can expect.

All children with autism spectrum disorder will have social skills deficits; which make social and communication skills and behaviors difficult for them to master.

Studies reveal that teaching social and communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder is one of the best indicators of positive long-term outcomes in the child’s development.

Consequently, parents of autistic children and teachers use tools such as social stories to improve and teach social and communication skills and behaviors. A simple social skills story can help a child with autism identify the important cues in a given situation.

A simple social skills story can show a child with ASD visually possible outcomes, for the skill or situation by giving focus to the key points, the social cues; thus, showing the child with autism spectrum disorder how another person may re-act or feel in the situation by describing another’s point of view.

A simple social skills story can also explain rules, routines, situations, upcoming events or abstract concepts; and how the child with ASD can understand others emotions, thoughts and feelings, expectations, cope with changes to routines and learn appropriate skills and behaviors.

ASD social stories use a specially defined formula. Generally written by experts, using first person language and normally visually rich. Most children with autism spectrum disorder are visual learners making visual social skills stories an ideal teaching tool.

Many parents of autistic children, as well as teachers and other professionals use social stories for children with ASD to help improve and teach even the most basic social skills such as tooth brushing to complex social skills like attending a wedding, a birth even explaining how to make friends, have conversations, ask questions and more.

To download social stories for children with ASD on a variety of issues visit any of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory

http://www.autismscoialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors

Wednesday, December 30th, 2009

We all need to be able to communicate to express our thoughts, feelings, needs and wants. As typically developing individuals we learn the skills of both verbal and non-verbal communication naturally, through things like our peers, families, schools and the environment. The ability to naturally acquire communication skills is absent in autistic children.

 

We communicate for many reasons, to offer help, support, to alert children to hazards and dangers, learning and for recreation. As typically developing individuals we also have the ability to read and send non-verbal communication of our thoughts, wishes, desires, needs, hopes and so on. By communicating we can also share so our experiences and knowledge through verbal or non-verbal means.

 

For autistic individuals the ability to communicate affectively is missing!

 

However there are treatments and resources for autism available to parents and educators of autistic children that will help with teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors. One of these treatments and resources for autism is called social stories.

 

What exactly are social stories?

Developed to help autistic individuals learn a functional means of communication the social story is appropriate for children with autism to learn and use appropriate social and communication skills and behaviors the majority of us learn naturally.

 

For example making friends, learning to play, listen, ask questions, use the bathroom, understand school rules, share, take turns, understand personal space and so on…

 

Social stories are a significant factor in teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors and are widely used by parents and educators of autistic children with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is a short, visually rich, descriptive piece of text written in first person tense which sets out in a step by step visual plan a skill, behavior, situation, task etc. in a way the child with autism can understand and follow simply. It shows the child with autism the what, why, where and when making them more comfortable with the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

The social skills story can be quickly and easily implemented and edited to suit individual needs. They can be read daily or whenever needed and can be used on their own or with other social stories depending on what help and support is needed.

 

To learn more about social stories for autistic children and young people; and how the can help you with teaching autistic children communication skills and positive behaviors to your child with autism visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites and gain immediate down load of social stories for autistic children and young people.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school



http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Social skills stories for autistic behaviors

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

A major issue for parents of autistic children is their concern that a lack of appropriate social and communication skills both verbal and non-verbal in their autism child will greatly hinder their development and ability to function in a “normal society”

Generally speech is quite often delayed in the autism child but will develop, with the percentage of autism children completely non-verbal being only 9%.

 

Social skills deficits in social and communication skills are common to all autism children. However there are autism treatments that parents of autistic children report provide a substantial improvement in their child’s social and communication skills development, which can help the autistic child develop and fit in with society with less of a struggle.

 

Probably one of the major autism treatments is social skills stories for autistic behaviors. These were first introduced almost twenty years ago to help facilitate social and communication issues reducing stress and anxieties in the autistic child or adult.


Significant numbers of parents of autistic children, care givers and teachers report that the use social stories to teach social and communication skills greatly improves positive behaviors and helps the autistic child reach his/her full potential socially.

 

There are many sites run by experts in autism offering autism treatments such as social skills stories for autistic behaviors, one such site is: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Social skills stories are now probably one of the major coping techniques for autistic behaviors used by parents of autistic children to help re-enforce skills and behaviors to the child with autism from everyday skills such as asking questions, listening and being a good sport to more complex skills and behaviors like, calming down, appropriate touching and lying.

 

Social skills stories are believed to improve social and communication skills in the child with autism plus personal and social development as well as reducing undesirable behaviors.

 

To find out more about social stories for autism as major coping techniques for autistic behaviors visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior


Social story on hygiene and autism

Friday, November 13th, 2009

Social stories are used to help teach social skills to autistic people. First developed almost twenty years ago social stories follow a set pattern which is easy for autistic people to understand.

 

Always written in the first person and visually rich with appropriate text, the social story will describe the skill or behavior the autistic child may be struggling to understand in an easy to follow step by step plan with visual images.

 

Generally children with autism struggle to understand social and communication skills, which the rest of us take for granted, for example hygiene skills such as eating habits, washing their teeth, hair and so on.


Therefore many parents of autistic children, care givers and educators implement social stories to help the autistic child comprehend and master the skill or behavior they are struggling with, this can ease anxieties and behavior issues.

 

As children with autism are generally visual learners social stories provide an excellent tool for parents of autistic children to use as they are visually rich, this helps the autistic child understand the social story far easier than the written word or an oral command or direction.

 

A common issue faced by parents of autistic children is their child’s lack of hygiene; many children with autism fail to understand the need for some hygiene skills and can be distressed by for example the sound the toilet makes, the taste of the toothpaste, visiting a dentist even getting a haircut can be stressful.

 

A social story on hygiene and autism, which can teach the appropriate hygiene skills, can ease stresses and anxieties.

 

To understand more about social skills stories for autism and how easy they can be implemented and used visit any of the following sites. Or for a specific social story on hygiene and autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene


For all other social skills stories for autism that help to teach social skills to autistic people visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com