Archive for the ‘children with autism spectrum’ Category

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Social Stories for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Related Conditions

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

Social Stories were first developed around twenty years ago to help children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions communicate.

A social story is a collection of images and first person text used to describe a situation or skill from the point of view of the autistic child.

Social skills stories are used much like a role model or visual plan detailing the individual steps needed or key points, in a manner that the autistic child can comprehend and follow.

For example a social story can be used to help with social awareness such as making friends which is something that most children on the spectrum struggle with. The social skills story will help the child understand what they are expected to do and in return what they can expect from others.

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where ,why, when and what as well as “HOW” and also give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of other people which is an area of marked weakness in children on the spectrum.

Having autism affects how a person processes information, thinks, acts, reacts and behaves. Social stories HELP by allowing the child the opportunity to rehearse and navigate skills and behaviours prior to them happening.

For example a social skills story can be used at recess typically most children with autism have difficulties with the chaos surrounding recess and can become distressed and confused. The social skills story will allow the child with autism to better understand what recess is and how they can cope with this part of the day.

Generally social stories are written in word format making them easy to edit, as no two children on the autism spectrum are ever going to be the same, plus we all use different terminology with our child. Therefore social skills stories need to be flexible and editable, to suit all needs and abilities.

Social stories for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions need to be printable making them convenient to use no matter where the child is.

There is no need for any formal training to use social skills stories, they may be implemented in school, at home and indeed anywhere the child with autism happens to need one.

Social stories are used for transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, re-enforcing already learnt skills, altering behaviours and many other situations and skills.

To learn more about social stories and how they can help your child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Teaching autistic kids social skills

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Children with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with social interactions. While typically developing children learn social skills naturally autistic kids do not. And will need special techniques to learn social skills.


Teaching autistic kids social skills can be done using visual intervention strategies and techniques.


Probably one of the major issues for autistic kids are their deficits in social and communication skills and often their understanding of self and those people around them is different from typically developing people.


It is often said that children on the autism spectrum appear to be locked in their own world and not interested in interacting with others. This can cause problems when the child is attending mainstream education. However there are techniques and strategies – visual intervention strategies – which can be used for teaching autistic kids social skills.


One of the major visual intervention strategies is social stories. Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help aid communication with the children on the autism spectrum she was working with, social stories have grown into one of the best and most used strategies for developing social and communications skills in children on the spectrum.


Social stories are short visual descriptive pieces of text that use visual images to describe a social situation or skill in terms of the relevant social cues.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, making visual strategies ideal tools. Images are a powerful means of communication that are universally understood by all, social stories use this concept much like a comic strip script that children on the autism spectrum can better understand.


Social skills stories break the skill or situation down into small sections “social cues” and answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.


By implementing social skills stories parents, care givers and teachers can help with teaching autistic kids social skills which can help with transitions, changes to routines, learning new skills, encouraging already learnt skills, hygiene issues and much more.


To download social skills stories that are used for teaching autistic kids social skills visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Or any of the following sites where you will find appropriate social skills stories


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

A diagnosis of autism

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010

Autism Spectrum Disorder is one of the most common developmental disorders. Research suggests that 1 in every 150 children born will receive a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no known cure for autism.


For many families a diagnosis of autism is devastating, however this need not be the case. Autism Spectrum Disorder is common and there are various methods and treatments of autism available. For most families after a diagnosis of autism has been given Early Intervention is probably going to be the most useful, this will help address the child’s social skills deficits.

 

So what are social skills deficits?  Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. Meaning the autistic child will have social and communication difficulties, social skills deficits are characteristically deficits with:

Social skills

Communication difficulties

Imagination difficulties

And Interaction skills

 

Social skills deficits are quite often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “Theory of mind”.

 

Typically developing children have a natural ability to recognize and read other peoples thoughts and feelings for example as typically developing individuals we would recognize a frown as a sign of confusion or unhappiness, and a smile as a sign of pleasure or happiness. This ability to recognize the feelings and emotions of others is missing with autism.


Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

A lack of social skills, their social skills deficits, can make it hard for the autistic child to interact socially and many parents fear their autistic child will struggle with friendships and social situations.

 

There are various treatments of autism which are available to parents over the internet, which HELP to address the social skills deficits and communication difficulties that are displayed by an autistic child, such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism spectrum disorder learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers can use social skills stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children with autism spectrum disorder.


Social stories are normally written by experts, using appropriate first person language and always from the point of view of the autistic child. Social stories use visual images to help the child with autism spectrum disorder understand what is expected of them and in return what they can expect. Social skills stories for autism answer the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) helping the child with autism spectrum disorder feel more comfortable with and in situations they may struggle to master or understand, which will cut back on negative behaviors.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

The autism spectrum disorders are more common in children than some better known disorders such as diabetes, spinal bifida, or Down syndrome.

 

All children with ASD demonstrate deficits in:


Social skills

Communication both verbal and non-verbal skills

Imagination skills

Interaction skills

 

These deficits are often referred to as social skills deficits and will be present in children with ASD to varying degrees.

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In addition to these social skills deficits children with ASD may also display sensory processing issues. Each of these autism symptoms will present in each individual child with ASD but will almost certainly differ between children. For example a child with ASD may have little trouble learning to read but exhibit extremely poor social interaction.

 

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder do not follow the normal pattern of development expected. Generally parents of ASD children may have an idea that there is something not quite right with their child before a diagnosis of autism is given.


From birth, typically developing babies are social beings. Early in life, they gaze at people, turn toward voices, grasp a finger, and even smile. However with ASD children this is not always the case. Research suggests that although children with ASD are attached to their parents, the attachment is not typical and is difficult to read. For parents of ASD children, their child’s apparent lack of attachment can be upsetting and stressful.

 

Generally typically developing children have met all their milestones in communication by the age of three, however for most ASD children these milestones may pass un-met. Communication is a problem for most ASD children.


Some children that receive a diagnosis of autism will never develop speech. It is not un-common for children with autism spectrum disorder to develop speech late in some instances as late as 9 years of age. For many ASD children using communication aids such as PECS, visual support cards and social stories can help them learn social and communication skills.

 

For those individuals with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching needs to be direct for example making friends, for typically developing children this skill is learnt naturally. For an ASD child this skill does not develop naturally, although some children with autistic spectrum disorder may wish to be social they do not know how.

 

Therefore children with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching can be helped using visual aids such as social stories, many parents, care givers; teachers and other professionals use social stories to great affect. With research showing us that since their development almost twenty years ago, social stories have grown into probably one of the most significant tools used in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autism and related conditions.


Social stories are a tool for used for teaching social and communication skills and behaviors to children with autistic spectrum disorder. They provide an individual with ASD visual explanations about situations that he or she may find difficult, stressful or confusing.


Social stories use a specifically defined style and format. The goal of social stories is to describe accurately using first person language and social cues in a clear and reassuring manner that is easily understood by the individual with ASD the situation or skill they are struggling with. Giving the individual with ASD accurate information in a step by step visual plan helping them manage and cope with the skill or behavior helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation or with the skill being taught or re-enforced, helping to reduce anxiety, stress and melt downs.

 

For more information on social stories for autism and how they can help with autistic spectrum disorder social and communication skills teaching visit any of the following sites where you will also gain immediate downloads of appropriate social stories for autism.

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 


Strategies for festive fun for children with autism

Wednesday, November 25th, 2009

The festive season need not be stress filled and full of anxieties for both you and your autistic child.


Following some simple strategies can help alleviate some of the pressures and confusions an autistic child feels this time of year. Using social stories as a strategy can greatly improve Christmas for an autistic child.


Probably one of the major issues related to Christmas for an autistic child is the confusion and changes to routine. All autistic people like routine and things to remain the same, which of cause is impossible in the festive season.


Consequently stress and anxieties are displayed which can lead to autistic behaviors such as aggression or meltdowns. To avoid or limit autistic behaviors many parents of children with autism implement specifically written social stories aimed at helping the child with autism cope with changes to routines and other social and communication skills that need altering or learning or re-enforcing this time of year.


For example putting up a Christmas tree, a child with autism spectrum disorder lives in a very literal world and can be confused as to why a tree is decorated and placed in the house! A simple social story can help explain why this happens and help the child with autism spectrum disorder participate in the decorating of the tree.

 

Research suggests using social stories as strategies for festive fun for children with autism can help encourage positive behaviors, which will help the entire family enjoy the festive season more.


Mainly written by experts social stories are visually rich with appropriate text following a specific formula, explaining in a step by step plan how to cope with or master a skill the autistic child is struggling with. A simple social story can help reduce negative behavior and alleviate stress.

 

To download social stories as strategies for festive fun for children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas

Using visual supports in autism teaching

Friday, October 16th, 2009

Children with autism spectrum disorder are generally visual learners often referred to as “visual thinkers”.

 

Teachers report better success rates using visual supports in autism teaching; especially if an activity is transferred from verbal to visual.

 

Using visual supports in autism teaching allows communication to occur on a verbal and nonverbal level. The idea is that using visual supports helps nonverbal students learn expressively as well as receptively.

 

Autistic students benefit from having access to visual supports such as social stories and PECS throughout their day.

 

Autism visual supports can help remind autistic students how to perform tasks such as assembly by showing them visually where they should be or what they should be doing.

 

By giving autistic students social stories you are helping them by providing them social, behavior and communication cues. 

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder can focus on the visual images and text in social stories which can help reduce anxieties surrounding tasks, events and occasions the autistic child may struggle with.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder display difficulties with speech and language, which can make even the simplest on instruction difficult at times.

 

Because of these problems in understanding, some autistic children may become anxious and confused by certain times in the school day or by certain lessons.

 

For example recess, assembly, art lessons and P.E. This is where social stories for autistic students can benefit the child by providing visual supports in autism teaching the autistic student how to cope with whatever is troubling or confusing them.

 

To download various social stories for autistic students as well as other social stories for everyday activities such as tooth brushing, showering even how to visit grandparents, go shopping or out to eat can be downloaded from sites such as:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources