Archive for the ‘visual supports autism’ Category

Communication difficulties in child with autism

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Common to individuals with autism are social skills deficits. Having social skills deficits can make communication difficult for a child with autism.

As typical beings we communicate both verbally and non-verbally daily. Communication is a major skill, we naturally learn. For individuals with autism however the ability to communicate is affected, having ASD can make an individual react and interact in a very different manner to typically developing beings.

For a child with an ASD expressing their needs or wants, can quite often be misunderstood. For example: In the classroom; A child with autism may not typically ask for a drink when they are thirsty, they may for example snatch the drink from another person, simply take the drink without asking or maybe they will shout out etc., this is typical to autism.

 

Normally all adverse autistic behaviour will happen for a reason an internal or external factor, not simply out of mischief or the desire to be awkward or naughty.

Research shows us autistic children are generally visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures. Therefore when teaching or caring for a child with autism it is usually best to use visual tools and supports when you are trying to get information across or tackle an adverse autistic behaviour. 

 

Research shows a child with autism will be less confused when the information presented to them is visual.

Understandably many teachers especially those teaching in mainstream education are little prepared to teach a child with autism. The English language is predominantly verbal, and this is the main focus in mainstream education. However with an autistic student this method of teaching is not always going to be affective.

With a poor attention span and communication difficulties with both verbal and non-verbal communication the autistic student may struggle with lessons which are primarily verbal or written.

A lack social skills and communication difficulties can make it problematic for autistic children to make and maintain friendships, and generally “fit in” socially.

Using visual support tools for autism such as social stories; WILL help to improve communication difficulties in a child with autism.

Using visual supports tools for autism within the classroom and at home can help the child with an ASD focus on the skill or situation that they are struggling with. A social skills story can show the child with an ASD a visual step by step plan or framework of what is expected of them and what they can expect from others.

The social skills story answers the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) helping the autistic child feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Developed almost twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help her communicate with the autistic children she was working with, the social story has now evolved into a significant tool used by parents and teachers to help them improve communication difficulties and social skills in their child with autism.

To find out more about social stories and how they help improve communication difficulties in a child with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Other sites offering social stories to improve social and communication skills for the autistic student can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Using visual supports aids for Autism

Wednesday, April 7th, 2010

Many children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, which means they can process and understand information better when it is presented visually, for example in pictures and images rather than orally or in written format.

 

Therefore, it is advisable that when trying to give information to a child with autism, it is normally better to avoid long verbal sentences. And to support any verbal instructions wherever possible using visual supports aids.


By using visual supports aids for autism such as visual support cards, social stories and visual timetables, the child with autism can better understand what is expected of them, or what information the other person is attempting to express.

 

Using visual supports aids for autism, for example social stories; has been proven to benefit many children and young people with autism. Social Stories are a tool for teaching social skills to children with autism and related disabilities.

 

A social story is much like a step by step visual plan, similar to a comic strip script.


The social story provides the autistic individual with accurate information about any situation, skill or behaviour they may be finding difficult, stressful or confusing.


A social story will break the situation, skill or behaviour down into small easier to understand pieces, and give key focus to the main points. Social stories attempt to answer the “wh” questions (who, where, when, why and what) as well as attempt to give the autistic individual an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

 

By giving the autistic individual possible reactions they may get from others as well as how others will expect them to act and why. The goal of the social story is to increase the individual’s understanding of, make him more comfortable in, and possibly suggest some appropriate responses for the situation, skill or behaviour.

 

By using visual support aids for Autism parents, care givers, teachers and other professionals agree that teaching and improving social and communications skills is made easier and less confusing for children with autism.

 

To learn more about social stories for children with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Alternatively other sites offering downloads of social stories for children with autism can be found at:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism

Thursday, March 4th, 2010

“Everyday”, “normal” hygiene routines for the majority of us come naturally. As typically developing individuals we have been programmed to watch, listen and learn from those around us and this is how we pick up on our hygiene routines.

 

For individuals on the spectrum this ability to watch, listen and learn is missing, autistic individuals are less likely to learn everyday, normal hygiene routines from watching others and in most cases will need direct teaching of these skills.

 

This can be done through the use of visual supports for autism and related conditions, we know autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, thus using visual supports for autism makes good sense. An individuals on the spectrum are far more likely to understand and follow a visual prompt than a written prompt or oral.

 

There are many visual support aids for autism available but probably the most significant of these are social skills stories. These were introduced around twenty years ago specifically for children with autism and related conditions, to help them communicate and understand skills and behaviours that they were struggling to master.

 

Deficits in social and communication skills are common to autism and using social skills stories has been proven affective. Many parents, teachers and other professionals use visual support aids for autism to help them teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours, for example hygiene routines like, brushing teeth, washing hair, getting a hair cut and so on.

 

Used correctly social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism are effective. You may download social stories from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Social stories are short, visual descriptive plans of a skill or behaviour, much like a comic strip. Social stories break the skill down into small visual steps, describing and showing the “wh” questions (who, where, what, when and why). Helping the individual with ASD understand what is expected of them, and in return what they can expect from others.

 

Making the individual with ASD feel more comfortable with and in the situation, which in turn can eliminate much of the stress and confusion they may be feeling.

 

Using social stories for direct teaching of healthy hygiene habits in autism can be achieved. To download hygiene social stories for autism visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene for all other social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Remember hygiene social stories for autism can be immediately downloaded and implemented today to help overcome hygiene issues in children with autism, as well as teens.]

 

 

 

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Visual supports for children with autism

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010


Generally children with autism are visual thinkers; which means they think in pictures. Therefore, the most successful ways to help children with autism learn and understand the information they are given is through visual supports and aids.

 

Many teachers and parents of children with ASD report negative behaviours and frustrations felt and displayed by children with autism when information is difficult to understand, such as written or oral instruction etc, rather than visual.

 

For many children with autism spoken words are not easy to comprehend, much like listening to a foreign language, which can be frustrating and stressful this can lead to meltdowns and the child generally just “switching off”

 

Consequently, it has been found that when attempting to teach or convey information to a child with ASD, using visual supports for children with autism is beneficial. Avoiding long spoken sentences or pieces of text with no illustration is advisable for most children with ASD.

 

Visual supports for children with autism are generally used to help support oral commands and information, for example visual support cards can be used to help show a child with autism the toilet, coat peg, library and so on..

 

The most significant visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions are visual support cards or (PECS) as well as other support aids such as social stories.

 

By using visual support cards it allows the child with ASD to focus on the message being taught or the information being presented.

 

In the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to help the student with ASD organize their day for example on a visual timetable. The student with ASD will like repetition and sameness, a visual timetable can help achieve this, the student can easily identify what lesson is coming up next, what they need to do, where they need to be etc.


Also in the classroom teachers of students with autism use visual supports cards to show direction and information. For example many teachers of students with autism place visual support aids on the pencil draw, the bathroom, sink and so on to help the student with ASD identify easily where things are, this can save a lot of confusion and stress not only for the teacher but also the student themselves.

 

In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual supports aids around the home again on a visual timetable, helping the child identify mealtimes, bath time, time for school and so on.


In the home parents of children with ASD and related conditions use visual aids to help the child identify certain areas, things, objects etc, for example the toilet, sink, where the cups are stored and so on.

 

Visual supports for children with autism spectrum disorder are also used to help the child with ASD learn social and communication skills, for example brushing your teeth, hair and so on. Used as a strategy visual supports can be used with social stories affectively to teach skills, communication and behaviours. Many parents of ASD children find used as a strategy visual supports and social stories are beneficial and both are recommended to help all children with ASD learn appropriate social and communication skills and behaviours.


To learn more and see examples of visual supports for children with ASD and related conditions visit:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Social stories that help can be instantly downloaded from:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

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Help with social skills at preschool for autistic children

Sunday, January 24th, 2010

During the preschool years children develop communication and social skills. It is during this time children build a solid building block for future growth. Through play children learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills as well as gross and fine motor skills.

 

Typically developing preschool children will learn social and communication skills naturally through play, interactions and watching their families and peers. With the autism preschooler these naturally developed skills will need direct teaching and careful consideration.

 

This is achievable using visual supports for autism. Developed to help children with autism learn and master social and communication skills, visual supports for autism are used readily by teachers, parents and other professionals involved in the care and well being of children with autism.

 

Teachers find help with social skills at preschool for autistic children using visual supports for autism such as visual supports cards and social skills stories. Reports show us these two significant tools for teaching social and communication skills are beneficial and can help preschool autistic children learn vital skills and behaviors such as potty training, sharing, and taking turns as well as play skills.

 

Help with social skills at preschool for autistic children such as social skills stories can now be downloaded and sourced through specialist sites for autism such as http://www.autismsocailstories.com/preschool

 

Social skills stories are short visual representations of a skill or behavior much like a comic strip using visual images to show a skill or behavior in a way that the preschooler with autism can understand. The text may be read by an adult and shared with the preschooler with autism.

 

Other sites offering help with social skills at preschool for autistic children such as visual supports cards for autism can be sourced through sites such as http://www.autismsocailstories.com/visual_aids

 

Visual support cards for autism are small laminated picture cards that can be used to show the preschooler with autism what is expected. They are also used as a reward system or for the autism preschooler to show what they need or want. For example the child may be thirsty or need the toilet, by selecting an appropriate card they can then show the teacher what is troubling them etc.

 

Both sites offer support to teachers and parents and help with social skills at preschool for autistic children through visual supports for autism such as social skills stories and visual supports cards for autism.

 

Visit: http://www.autismscoailstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsoailstories.com/potty

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

 

 

Visual supports for autism

Monday, March 23rd, 2009


We all use visual supports each day, we look at the newspaper, we read a magazine. Watch TV, the news, the internet and so on all these are visual supports they are things we visually look at to get information.

 

When we travel we might look at a map or tele-text, these are also visual supports.


We need visual supports to function at our best we need them for instruction, work, recreation and education…


…Have you ever considered a life without visual supports or prompts? Imagine no TV no internet no newspaper no books and so on, how boring that life would be and how out of touch with what’s happening around us we would get?

 

Autistic people are often referred to as being in an “autism own world”, they lack interest in what’s happening around them. But they will still need visual supports for autism.

 

The visual supports for autism will include things like visual timetables, mini schedules, Now and Then and choice boards, emotion, flash and PECS cards as well as social skills stories and other visual supports for autism, like file folder games and so on..

 

Autistic children are visual learners and will benefit from visual cues, prompts and instruction far more than from written text and long verbal sentences where they can become easily distracted and lack interest.

 

Therefore a good starting point for all autistic educators is setting up visual aids for the autistic student.

 

All autistic children will respond better to visual lessons; the autistic educator should try and keep this in mind when preparing lessons for the autistic student.

 

Another good rule would be to have autism resources in place like visual timetables, mini schedules and other valuable autism resources like social skills stories vital in helping the autistic student understand what is happening and also good for keeping the autistic student on task.

 

The internet has now made it possible for autistic educators and parents to access suitable autism resources easily.

 

Suitable autism resources like social skills stories play a vital part in the lives of autistic individuals.

 

..And now anyone working or caring for an autistic individual can download and find social skills stories on any topic, activity, social skill, event etc that the autistic individual is struggling with making life a whole lot easier!

 

Follow any of the links below to download suitable social skills stories for all autistic individuals as well as suitable social skills stories for autistic students.

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/potty

www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

www.autismsocialstories.com/valentines_day

www.autismsocialstories.com/mothers_day

 

 

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