Archive for the ‘visual supports for autism’ Category

Autism goals for interaction

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic individual’s brain; this can affect how the person with autism spectrum thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

 

Autism impairs the autistic individual’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

 

Typically kids with autism spectrum disorder have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

 

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

 

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

 

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic individual’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on Autism goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

 

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism spectrum disorder and social skills should be taught directly.

 

Generally kids with autism spectrum disorder rare visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; this is achievable using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder such as social stories.

 

Using visual supports for autism spectrum disorder can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

 

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism spectrum disorder overcome social interaction difficulties.

 

To find appropriate Autism goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

Enhancing social skills in autistic children

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

For the vast majority of autistic children social skills ARE either missing or NEED improving.

This is due to the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits, which ARE common to autism to varying degrees

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect how the child on the spectrum acts, re-acts, thinks and behaves.

Methods for enhancing social skills in autistic children ARE generally visual. This is because most children on the spectrum ARE visual learners and thinkers and will tend to use language secondary.

Visual supports for autism such as: social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards etc ARE visual supports which can be introduced simply and need NO formal training to use.

Characteristically children on the spectrum find visual supports for autism beneficial. Social skills stories ARE short descriptive visual supports which describe a skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story looks much like a comic script, using images/pictures and short precise pieces of text. The social story is always from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, using first person text in short sentences.

The social story answers the “wh” questions: who, what, Why, where, and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight wherever possible into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

Social skills stories CAN be used for a wide variety of situations or skills such as: asking questions, calming down, hygiene issues, self-help skills and so on…

For many children on the spectrum visual supports for autism ARE invaluable and can be treated like visual plans or frameworks to help them cope with and learn skills and behaviours which cause stress and anxiety.

To learn more about visual supports for autism like social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards as well as other visual supports visual http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Using visual supports for autism

Monday, February 20th, 2012

Typically children with autism ARE visual thinkers and learners which means that they think in pictures and that speech/language is secondary.

It is therefore believed that for children with autism information and teaching that is VISUAL WILL be far easier for them to understand.

 Using visual supports for autism is therefore beneficial. There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant ARE social stories, PECS, communication picture cards, visual timetables and so on…

Using visual supports for autism WILL help you to teach social skills and address communication difficulties as well as helping to OVERCOME many of the difficulties the child with autism is struggling with.

Social skills stories ARE an important visual intervention strategy which was first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Gray to help OVERCOME communication difficulties for children with autism.

Since then the social story has developed and is now probably the most significant support for autism. The social skills story WILL help address the child’s social skills deficits.

All children with autism HAVE social skills deficits these ARE common to autism, but will vary between individuals. Social skills deficits affect how the child with autism processes information, acts, re-acts, behaves and thinks as well processes sensory stimuli and sensation.

The social skills story is a short descriptive piece of text that can act like a visual plan or framework of the skill detailing visually what is happening and what the child with autism CAN expect.

A social skills story WILL always be written from the child’s own perspective and WILL normally always be written in first person text. The social skills story should break the skill into smaller sections much like a comic script and answer the “wh” questions  – who, what, where, why and when as well as “HOW” and provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Typically social stories are written in word format which WILL make them easier to personalize and edit, no two children are ever going to be the same and we all USE different terminology with our kids, therefore the need for editing is important.

For kids with ASD social awareness skills ARE difficult to master but by using visual supports for autism this can be addressed quite simply, which CAN help the child on the spectrum feel more comfortable with and in situations that they would once struggle with.

To learn more about how kids with ASD can cope with social awareness skills using supports for autism such as social stories and communication picture cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocalstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder goals for interaction

Thursday, August 25th, 2011

Autism spectrum disorder is a neurological disorder affecting the autistic person’s brain; this can affect how the autistic person thinks, re-acts, acts and behaves.

Autism impairs the autistic person’s social interactions and communication skills and can cause restricted and repetitive stereotypical behaviors.

Typically kids with autism have difficulties with verbal and non-verbal communication this can impact on their abilities to socially interact.

Autism is characterized by several developmental challenges. The autism symptoms can include:  Language may develop slowly or not at all. The autistic child may use words without attaching meaning to them. They may use echolalia, and have poor attention spans.

The child with autism will probably prefer to spend time alone rather than with others, shows little interest in making friends, and be less responsive to social cues such as eye contact or smiles.

These autism symptoms impact on the autistic person’s ability to interact effectively and can cause isolation and social blunders. Consequently, when deciding on autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions these autism symptoms should first be looked at.

Typically developing children learn social skills such as social interactions naturally through play, from their peers, parents and those around them. This ability is missing in kids with autism and social skills should be taught directly.

Generally kids with autism are visual learners and will better understand any social skills teaching when taught and re-enforced visually; This is achievable using visual supports for autism such as social stories.

Using visual supports for autism can make the implementation of autism goals for interactions much easier. By careful observations parents of autistic children can determine which social interaction skills their child is finding difficult and an appropriate social skills story can be put in place to help them overcome this.

Many parents of autistic children use social skills stories to help teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills with great success rates.

 

The social skills story is visually rich with short appropriate pieces of text set out in a specific format. Developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories are probably the most significant autism tool used to help kids with autism overcome social interaction difficulties.

To find appropriate autism spectrum disorder goals for interactions social skills stories as well as social skills stories for other social skills teaching such as making friends, answering questions, appropriate touching and many more visit any of the following sites and gain immediate downloads:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

Pumpkin patterns
PLUS: GRAB YOUR FREE Pumpkin Pattern ebook

Patterns to Paint or Carve

Fun for Adults and Kids

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/Halloween

 

 

PLUS:

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

 

Social skills training for autism

Friday, September 3rd, 2010

For the vast majority of autistic individuals the “everyday or normal” communication and social challenges they face can cause stress and anxieties.


Many children with autism experience difficulty with aspects of social interactions and communication. This is referred to as social skills deficits, this means the ASD child has impaired abilities in certain aspects for example they will struggle to relate to their peers and form or maintain friendships.


Methods such as social skills stories for autism can be used to overcome many of the hurdles autistic individuals face on an almost daily bases with social and communication difficulties.


A common difficulty shared by the majority of children with autism is to make inappropriate remarks (communication difficulties) or behave in socially unacceptable ways with little awareness of the social implications of these behaviours.


Social skills stories can help by not asking the ASD child to change inappropriate social behaviours. Instead, social skills stories work by visually showing the ASD child an alternative communication or socially acceptable skill or alternative social strategies.


Used as a means of communication and social skills training for autism, social skills stories are easy to implement and use, they need no formal training, can be printed, edited and personalized to suit individuals own specific needs.


Social skills stories are used as a role model for appropriate behaviours. Generally most autistic individuals will be visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in images and pictures. Therefore, using visual supports for autism is by far the best option. This visual strategy is implemented in social skills stories for autism, appropriate visual images are used with first person text as a visual plan of the skill, situation, task or communication difficulties the ASD child may be struggling with.


Research suggests visual supports for autism can be beneficial in social skills training for autism. By using a visual strategy children with autism can better understand skills and behaviours the rest of us take for granted such as making friends, washing our teeth, respecting personal space, asking questions and so on.


To learn more about social skills stories for autism and how they may benefit your child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Probably one of the major roles a parent plays in their child’s development is teaching their child social skills. For example daily living skills like potty training, interaction skills like sharing, taking turns, and allowing others to talk without interrupting.

 

Typically developing children learn social and communication skills naturally by people watching, observing how those around them do things and handle social situations. We don’t really stop to consider how easily our typically developing children can master suitable age appropriate social and communication skills.


However this is not the case for a child with an ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

 

What are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them?

 

For a child with an ASD learning social and communication skills naturally is not easy, due to social skills deficits common to all individuals with autism.

 

Individuals with autism do not people watch and fail to recognise some nonverbal communication such as gestures and signs, for example waving goodbye, a thumb’s up or shhhhhh etc.

 

Generally children with autism spectrum disorder need direct teaching of social and communication skills and behaviours.

 

Consequently, parents are encouraged to help their autistic youngster learn appropriate social skills. Having social skills deficits may mean your child fails to recognise subtle cues, maybe unable to read body language or facial expression and misunderstand language such as wit, humour, jokes and slang etc…


So; social skills deficits how can you help your autistic child overcome them, many parents use visual supports for autism. This is mainly because children with autism spectrum disorder are normally visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures and images, which makes using visual supports for autism beneficial.

 

Therefore using visual supports for autism is going to help you teach your autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills. There are various visual supports for autism available, but probably the best know and most affective are social skills stories.


A social skills story is a visual framework that is effective in teaching children with autism social and communication skills. A social skills story breaks the skills or situation down into relevant key points giving explanations of the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into nonverbal communication such as the thoughts, feelings and emotions that may be felt by others.


By using visual images and first person text a social story allows the child on the spectrum to visually identify with the skill or situation making it predictable and routine. Individuals with autism prefer to stick rigidly to routines and can become stressed if routines are altered or changed, social skills stories are ideal for this, they can prepare the autistic child for upcoming changes.


Social skills stories follow specific patterns of sentence types, are editable and printable making them convenient and easy to use. The social skills story can be used to teach most social and communication skills. For example potty training, using a toilet, washing your hands, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, not interrupting, asking questions, making friends, even social situations like visiting the dentist etc..


By breaking the skill or situation down in to understandable pieces, removing all fluff and irrelevant material etc the social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan allowing the child on the spectrum to feel more in control and comfortable. Removing all fear or dread of the unknown, the social story makes the skills or situation predictable just how a child on the spectrum likes things to be.


To learn more about social skills stories and how they are used to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


Where you will learn more about…what are social skills deficits and how can you help your autistic child overcome them as well as getting downloads of social skills stories used to teach social and communication skills to children with autism.


Help teach autistic children to make friends

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) affects about one in every 100 children born.

 

Autistic children are sometimes referred to as being “locked in their own world” and struggle to communicate with others. Many autistic children have hyper or hypo sensitivities, will display repetitive behaviours and obsessive tendencies.


All children on the spectrum will have social skills deficits, the theory of mind: Social interactions, communication difficulties and imagination skills do not develop in the typical manner.

 

The theory of mind refers to how the child on the spectrum cannot readily appreciate the feelings, knowledge, or beliefs of other people, nor recognise or interpret his or her own thought processes. Consequently they will display communication difficulties, a lack of self-consciousness, and an inability to understand social situations, skills, nonverbal communications and imagination skills.

 

It is because of the theory of mind a child on the spectrum may find making friends difficult preferring solitary play.


Typically developing children may find a child on the spectrum hard to befriend, this is not uncommon, autistic children can appear rude, aloof and at times unfriendly or approachable.

 

This is due to their social skills deficits, an autistic child may fail to recognise nonverbal signals sent from another child, humour or jokes, they may lack the skills to pretend play, share or take turns all of which can make befriending an autistic child hard.

 

There are methods that can help teach autistic children to make friends, one method which is easy to use and can be implemented without any need for formal training is social stories.

 

Social stories are visual supports for autism which were developed almost twenty years ago as a means of aiding communication difficulties. However today their uses have increased, social stories are probably one of the major methods used to help autistic children learn social skills such as making friends.

 

Social stories are short, almost comic like representations of a skill or behaviour from the autistic person’s point of view. Using visual images and first person text the social story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what a well as give an insight into the thought process, emotions, feelings and nonverbal communications of others.

 

Today visual supports for autism play a large part in the teaching of social, communication and imagination skills of children on the spectrum. Generally written by experts, teachers and parents of children on the spectrum, social stories are editable, can be personalized and should be printable for convenience of use. To access social skills stories for issues like making friends visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

To learn more about social skills stories for children with autism and how they can be used to help teach autistic children to make friends, as well as for a wide variety of issues such as respecting personal space, asking questions, recess, visiting the dentist, joining in PE lessons and so on.


Get access to social skills stories for children with autism and related conditions.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills