Archive for the ‘autistic impairments’ Category

Enhancing social skills in autistic children

Sunday, May 13th, 2012

For the vast majority of autistic children social skills ARE either missing or NEED improving.

This is due to the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits, which ARE common to autism to varying degrees

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect how the child on the spectrum acts, re-acts, thinks and behaves.

Methods for enhancing social skills in autistic children ARE generally visual. This is because most children on the spectrum ARE visual learners and thinkers and will tend to use language secondary.

Visual supports for autism such as: social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards etc ARE visual supports which can be introduced simply and need NO formal training to use.

Characteristically children on the spectrum find visual supports for autism beneficial. Social skills stories ARE short descriptive visual supports which describe a skill or situation in terms of the relevant social cues.

The social story looks much like a comic script, using images/pictures and short precise pieces of text. The social story is always from the point of view of the child on the spectrum, using first person text in short sentences.

The social story answers the “wh” questions: who, what, Why, where, and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight wherever possible into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistic children.

Social skills stories CAN be used for a wide variety of situations or skills such as: asking questions, calming down, hygiene issues, self-help skills and so on…

For many children on the spectrum visual supports for autism ARE invaluable and can be treated like visual plans or frameworks to help them cope with and learn skills and behaviours which cause stress and anxiety.

To learn more about visual supports for autism like social skills stories, picture communication cards, visual schedules and flash cards as well as other visual supports visual http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Behaviour management for kids with autism

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

It is important to remember it is more useful to put strategies in place to help prevent inappropriate behaviours before they happen than to try and deal with the behaviour once it has occurred.

It is also important to remember that ALL behaviour displayed by kids with autism is for a reason an internal or external factor NEVER just because as with typically developing children.

Due to the triad of autistic impairments children with autism have a lack of social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that because of the triad of autistic impairments that any behaviour management for kids with autism is devised to help the child with ASD understand and cope with skills and behaviours that they struggle to understand and manage.

Help such as visual intervention strategies, which ARE used to help teach social awareness, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

There are many different positive behaviour supports like visual intervention strategies such as: Social Skills Stories, Visual Social Story Cards, Flash Cards, PECS and so on…

Using Positive behaviour supports for ASD is beneficial.

For example positive behaviour supports for ASD can teach self-help skills, choice and decision making, routine changes, social awareness, communication skills and environmental changes as well as much more.

Probably one of the major strategies used is social skills stories – these are short descriptive pieces of text which can be used to help the child with ASD feel more comfortable with and in a situation.

Social Skills Stories use visual images to help explain a situation, skill, behaviour or event from the child’s own perspective. Typically kids with ASD are visual thinkers and learners; this means that they understand visual information easier than that which is written or spoken.

Noticeably kids with ASD have communication difficulties and find reading facial expressions and body language confusing, this is also due to their social impairments.

Having social impairments can make friendships difficult to build and maintain again positive behaviour supports for ASD can help alleviate this issue and help the child with autism develop friendships.

The social story will help answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will provide the child with autism an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most autistics.

The social story can act like a visual framework or plan of the skill being taught, it will focus on the key points or cues and suggest possible outcomes for the child with autism to follow.

To learn more about behaviour management for kids with autism and how social skills stories WILL help visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism

Friday, July 29th, 2011

Typically children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills this is due to the Triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.
The Triad of autistic impairments affect three main areas of development: Social skills, Communication skills and Imagination skills.

It is these deficits that make it difficult for a child on the spectrum to interact socially and can make the child on the spectrum appear rude even aloof at times.
Treatments for autism ARE put in place to HELP overcome social skills deficits. Probably the most significant of the various treatments for autism available ARE “Social Skills Stories”

Generally social skills stories are written for a specific task or skill and WILL detail that skill or task in specific terms giving focus to the social cues.

Much like a Role Model or Visual Plan of the skill a breakdown of the skill or task into smaller sections like this video example of one of our social stories:

The social skills story aims to answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as How and to give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness for most autistic people.

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism ARE social stories made simpler.

Social story cards are simply a social story broken into sections, with each section then put onto a separate card the cards are then shown individually like turning the pages of a book.

Social story cards for teaching social skills to children with autism ARE easy to USE, and can be put in place in the same manner as a regular social story.

To learn more and see a picture example of social story cards visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find a section dedicated to this simpler version of the regular social story.

Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, June 30th, 2011

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic impairments.

What are Autistic Impairments?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: Can Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

ASD in children

Friday, June 10th, 2011

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a neurological disorder which affects more boys than girls. Generally ASD is diagnosed before a child reaches three years of age.

ASD in children will typically affect how the child interacts, behaves and communicates with others. This is commonly known as the Triad of Autistic Impairments or social skills deficits and will affect all children with an ASD, in varying degrees.

The Triad of Autistic Impairments are typical to Autism Spectrum Disorder and can be treated with intervention strategies designed to help children with an ASD overcome their social skills deficits.

Intervention strategies like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards are commonly used to help the ASD child understand and cope with situations and skills that they are struggling with or find stressful, like for example recess, asking questions and making friends.

Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago by therapist Carol Grey as a means of communication with the children she was working.

Social skills stories comprise of four sentence types; Perspective, Directive, Descriptive and control and will generally follow a set formula.

Typically for the ASD child social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which is an area of marked weakness in children with an ASD.

No two autistic kids will ever be the same, and we all use different terminology, therefore most social skills stories are written in word format which means that they are easy to edit.

Generally most autistic kids are visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures. It is therefore important to use visual supports like social skills stories, PECS and visual support cards.

ASD in children is not cure-able but by using visual supports like social skills stories YOU will find teaching an ASD child social skills can be considerably improved.

Social skills stories use first person text and visual images in a manner that all kids with autism will find easy to understand. A social skills story can act as a role model or visual step by step plan.

Parents, caregivers, teachers and assistants can use any social skills story without any formal training. They can be downloaded, edited, printed and implemented easily and for most situations and skills the child is struggling with.

To learn more teaching an ASD child social skills using social stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com where you will find social stories to download.

 

Teaching children on the autism spectrum

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Many people with autism are visual thinkers, this means they think in pictures rather like a DVD running through their imagination, pictures being their first language, and words (spoken and written)  being their second language.

 

Therefore teaching children on the autism spectrum is made a whole deal easier if the teaching is done pictorially or visually.

 

Rather than string together long sentences or display written instruction try to use more visual prompts such as diagrams, pictures, graphs and images when teaching.

 

Avoid long strings of verbal instructions. People with autism have problems with remembering the sequence this a common symptom of autism.

 

Using visual supports like visual support cards, PECS and social stories are excellent visual supports for children on the autism spectrum. For example children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills; this is a common symptom of autism and is present in all children on the autism spectrum.

 

Having difficulties with social and communication skills is referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect three main areas of development: Social skills, Communication skills and Imagination skills.

 

Using social stories as an Intervention strategy parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals are able to combat difficulties with the individual’s autistic impairments.

 

For example many children with autism struggle with transitions, changes to routines, reading emotions and expressions, learning skills, behaviours, communication and imagination. A social skills story can target the difficulty and visually show a detailed plan for tackling the situation.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip visually representing the skill or situation being taught, like a role model or visual plan. The social story will break the skill down into easy to understand sections, removing un-necessary language and fluff.

 

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is a marked difficulty for most people with autism.

 

The social skills story uses visual images or pictures to explain the skill or situations and first person appropriate language always written from the autistic child’s point of view.

 

Most social stories are written in word format making them easy to edit and personalize, as none of us use the same terminology with our children and no two social story are ever going to be the same therefore social stories should be easy to edit.

 

Social stories should also be convenient to use, printable social stories for children with autism are available from reputable sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find printable social stories for children with autism on a wide variety of issues such as: hygiene, for school, at home and for occasions and activities like visiting the dentist, getting a haircut and transitions such as moving school and house as well as for everyday skills like making friends.

 

To find downloads of social stories for kids with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively

Friday, July 2nd, 2010

Children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) regardless of their age will have autistic behaviour issues, this is a fact.

 

The term Autism Spectrum Disorder is an umbrella term used to describe a set of conditions ranging from Asperger syndrome to low functioning autism. The common denominator in all children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is their social skills deficits or the triad of autistic impairments.

 

The triad of autistic impairments – social skills deficits that are associated with ASD affect the autistic child in three main areas of development, each of which can have its own specific autistic behaviour difficulties.


The areas of development affected are:

Social Interactions,

Communication Difficulties,

And Imagination Skills Deficits

 

For children with autism the world can seem confusing, with situations we find normal can to an autistic child be stressful and can even cause anxiety or autistic behaviour difficulties. For example a surprise visit, a dental check up, birthday party, even a change in routine, TV programme change etc can all be anxiety triggers to a children with autism.

 

It is because of their social skills deficits a child on the spectrum can seem distant, distracted, have a poor attention span even appear aloof or rude. This can cause issues with peers etc and sometimes even lead to social isolation and at times bullying.

 

Treatments of autism that are aimed at addressing autistic behaviour issues can be implemented easily to help a child on the spectrum cope with and understand situations or skills that cause them stress or can be anxiety triggers to the child on the spectrum.

 

One of the major treatments of autism used is social skills stories. First developed to aid Communication Difficulties, social skills stories are now mainly used to teach children on the spectrum social, communication and imagination skills and address autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

Managing autistic behaviour issues effectively using social skills stories has proven effective for many years. With their growing popularity social skills stories are now more widely available, sites offering expertly written social skills stories allow parents, caregivers and teachers that opportunity to download this valuable resource, sometimes for a small fee.

 

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the point of view of the autistic child, using visual images and first person text, the social story will follow a set pattern of sentence type to form a short visual plan, like a comic strip.

 

This short story will visually represent the skill or situation and act as a role model to the autistic child, helping them to feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

Social skills stories can be printed an edited to make them more personal to the child on the spectrum and for ease of use and convenience. Sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com offer a wide variety of social skills stories on a variety of subjects. All of which can help parents struggling with managing autistic behaviour issues.


To learn more about how a social story will help your autistic child visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

 

 

 

Teaching daily living skills in children with autism

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

Research shows that children with ASD (autism spectrum disorder) are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures.


Therefore teachers and parents find that teaching daily living skills in children with autism spectrum disorder is much easier if visual supports for ASD are used.


Probable the biggest hurdle for children with autism spectrum disorder is their difficulty with social interactions, imagination and communication skills and behaviors.

 

These social skills deficit are often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments, which all individuals with ASD will have in varying degrees.

 

For the majority of children with ASD the triad of autistic impairments can make finding and making friends difficult. For a child with autism our world is confusing, we are on the whole socially orientated, so having a lack of social interaction skills can cause social mistakes and misunderstandings.

 

Consequently, parents of children with autism spectrum disorder, care gives and teaches use visual supports for ASD such as social stories to assist them in teaching and re-enforcing social and communication skills and behaviors.


Social stories help develop social interaction skills, imagination, language and communication in children ASD. As well as encouraging daily living skills in children with autism. Social skills stories are also used to teach social skills such as hygiene, or behaviors such as making friends, personal space, visiting the dentist and so on…

 

Social skills stories are also useful in and around school. Developed twenty years ago to teach social and communication skills to children with autism, social skills stories are normally written in fist person text, following a set formula using visual images to show and explain the skill or behavior being taught or re-enforced.

 

Almost like a comic strip, the visual step by step plan will show individuals with ASD the what, why, where, when and who helping them feel more comfortable in and with the situation , activity, event or skill they are struggling to master.


To download and learn more about social stories for ASD and how they are used for encouraging daily living skills in children with autism spectrum disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

For all other social stories for ASD visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

 

Life after a diagnosis of autism

Saturday, November 7th, 2009

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world; autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders today with 1 in every 150 children receiving a diagnosis of autism.

 

Scientists still have no cure for autism, but strive to find answers to the burning questions what is autism and how is it cured?

 

So as we know it what is autism and how do we cope and move forward with life after a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder? Autism spectrum disorder is a complex set of autism symptoms or characteristics all pertaining to the way a child develops (brain) the autism symptoms or characteristics affect the way a child develops in the triad of autistic impairments.

 

Put simply the triad of autistic impairments are deficits in the way the autism child develops skills and behaviors their social, communication, imagination and interaction skills will be poor and not develop in the normal way.


For typically developing children these skills develop naturally without us needing to really put much thought and effort into their development, for example typically developing children will be naturally inquisitive, will want physical contact, can make eye contact, will quickly learn to point, will crawl, stand, play, and want the interaction of peers and family members.

 

For the autism child these natural skills need to be encouraged and will need direct teaching.

 

Although there is no cure for autism there are treatments for autism that make the life of the autism child much easier and allow them to develop to their full potential. Autism spectrum disorder is not a mental disorder, but that said some kids with autism, those on the lower end of the autism spectrum scale may not develop speech or it may develop late and may display educational difficulties.

 

Generally those kids with autism on the higher end of the autism spectrum scale will be of average to above average intelligence and you may here them referred to as “the little professor” or “geeks”.

 

One of the major treatments for autism that can really help the autism child and parent is social stories. These can help bridge that gap and teach the social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors that the rest of us take for granted.

 

Since their development almost twenty years ago treatment for social skills deficits in autism has moved forward in huge leaps and bounds. Parents, teachers and all others involved in and child’s care can use social stories with the child to help connect and teach skills and behaviors the autism child may not understand or may find stressful.

 

The social stories can be used for all social skills deficits in autism from the very basic like mastering tooth brushing, wiping your nose, to the more complex like making friends, controlling behaviors, asking questions, being a good sport and so on they are very versatile, editable and usually visually rich following set guidelines and using appropriate text.

 

For many parents life after a diagnosis of autism can move forward significantly using social stories they can help their child feel more comfortable with skills, situations, events and behaviors their child is struggling with making family life tolerable and also life in school easier and less stressful for their child.

 

Generally all kids with autism respond well to social stories and huge success are normally reported for this excellent tool in the treatment for social skills deficits in autism.


To download and find out more about the benefits of social stories for kids with autism and how they help as a “significant” treatment for social skills deficits in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites are also good portals of social stories for kids with autism:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

The symptoms of mild autism

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurobiological disorder, there is no cure for autism and typically the symptoms of autism will be ongoing throughout the autistic person’s life.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by varying degrees of autistic impairments often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

These social skills deficits are typically displayed in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills and abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors.

 

The symptoms of autism range from mild autism which is often called asperger syndrome to severe autism or low functioning autism.

 

The symptoms of mild autism can vary between individuals on the spectrum. Although all children on the autism spectrum disorder scale may exhibit some similar traits not every child will display all of characteristics associated with autism.

 

A child with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may never develop speech or it may be delayed and may have other educational disabilities, while a child with autism on the higher end of the autism scale can be high-functioning with average or above average intelligence and attend mainstream school.

 

Some autistic children have sensory processing issues in some or all of the senses and may display sensory processing issues such as being sensitive to the feel of fabric so much so that all tags must be cut out of clothing before they will wear it. Another child with autism may display no sensory issues at all.


However, all children with autism spectrum disorder will display social skills deficits with communication whether your child has the symptoms of mild autism or severe they will all have communication both verbal and non-verbal communication skills difficulties.

 

A child with autism will have difficulties relating to other people and will fail to understand non-verbal communication or body language.


Children with autism spectrum disorder are often referred to as having “mind blindness” or lacking the “theory of mind”. This means missing the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions expressed by other people.


For example we can tell a lot by a person’s posture, we can tell whether they are approachable, upset or happy, this ability to read another person is missing in people with autism.


However there are treatments available to people with autism that can help them learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

The internet makes finding appropriate autism resources that help autistic people learn these social skills much easier. Generally most autistic people have found tremendous successes with autism resources such as social skills stories.

 

The symptoms of mild autism are such that generally most autistic children or asperger syndrome individuals can use social skills stories efficiently for coping and understanding social skills that they otherwise struggle to comprehend, which can sometimes lead to social blunders and stressful situations.


Sites that offer downloads OF SOCIAL SKILLS STORIES as well as expert advice and support like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com