Archive for the ‘autism visual supports’ Category

Having Autism and finding friends

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

For most children with autism lacking social interaction skills is common. Many children with autism will want to make and have friends but will find this process confusing and stressful.

Lacking social interaction skills is often referred to as the autism triad of impairments but those autism triad of impairments will vary from child to child.

The actual degree a child is affected with the autism triad of impairments will generally depend on the individual’s social development.

Some children with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may have little or no language and may have other related disabilities. On the other end of the autism scale those children with asperger syndrome will often be schooled in mainstream schools and be of average to above average intelligence. This set of individuals will probably desire friendships.

Those children with asperger syndrome or mild autism will probably want friendships but making and maintaining those friendships will be a struggle, unfortunately it is believed around 40% of autistic children in mainstream education will at some point be a victim to bullying.

For most typically developing children recess and break times are a time of fun and a chance to run around and interact with their peers, this is “normal behavior”

However this is not the case with an autistic child, often the sound of the bell can fill them with fear and dread. Autistic children prefer structure, routine and dislike surprises, noises and the unstructured chaos of free time. They find choice making difficult and can sometimes be overwhelmed by recess and break times.

A lot of autistic children find recess confusing, there are a lot of choices to be made, what to play with, who to play with, what to do, so many choices a “typical child” will take for granted and enjoy, this is not the case with an autistic child.

For example a simple game, the autistic child may choose to join in with their peers, but may find comprehending the rules confusing, they may not understand the need for the rules, and then just as they start to understand the rules may change or the game may stop.

The other end to this is those children with autism that will stick rigidly to the rule and this can sometimes take the fun out of the game for the other normally developing children, they may loose interest and unfortunately the autistic child may not understand why this is and become distressed.

Some autistic children can become overwhelmed by noise, which can make recess or break time a painful and stressful time, you may find them pacing up and down in their own little world until recess is over and they can return to the routine and structure of the classroom.

All these factors can make autism and finding friends difficult to say the very least.

So how can you help with the problem of autism and finding friends?

Generally as we discussed earlier kids with autism prefer structure and routine, this can be achieved by the use of autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories, these resources are used in the classroom to add structure and routine the child’s day.

These autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism cope with recess and break times taking away some of anxieties they may feel around this time of the day.

The autism visual supports can also be used to help autistic children understand how to maintain friendships, by teaching the autistic child how to use conversation, how to pretend play, how to be kind, respect peoples feelings and personal space, how to share and make choices and so on, all social skills we take for granted, but an autistic child will need to be taught these social skills directly.

Therefore the perfect place to start with autism and making friends is with autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories to teach the autistic child the social skills necessary for making and maintaining friendships and dealing with recess and break times.

 

You can find appropriate social skills stories and other autism resources for kids with autism for download at:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/stories.html

www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory.html

Autism Visual Supports

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Commonly the vast majority of children with autism WILL struggle with the everyday tasks and skills that a typically developing individual will have NO PROBLEMS with, like for example making friends, asking questions appropriately, joining in play and so on.

It’s mainly due to the individuals social skills deficits which ARE common to ALL with Autism Spectrum Disorder and in many cases sensory processing issues that many children with autism have difficulties with otherwise “normal” skills and behaviours.

It is therefore recommended that using autism visual supports CAN be beneficial. Autism visual supports are designed specifically to help overcome some of the difficulties many children and young people with autism face daily.

Recent autism treatment research suggests that autism visual supports like visual support cards, social stories, PECS communication boards and visual schedules all HAVE a large part to play in the treatment and development of social and communication skills for many autistic kids.

Parents CAN NOW find sites offering autism visual supports which ARE run by parents and professionals that offer support and other autistic resources.

Sites which offer autistic resources can be found easily using search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing and through Directories.

The World CAN be a very confusing place to a child on the spectrum,   many of the everyday skills we take for granted  a child with autism CAN FIND difficult and stressful.

Typically many families with an autistic child can find even supposedly fun activities like visiting relatives, a trip to the shop, supermarket, buying new clothes can be difficult when you have a child on the autism spectrum.

Help, is what most families with an autistic child need as well as trusted supports that have been proven to work.  

Help such as social stories ARE beneficial. What are social stories?

Probably the most significant autism visual supports ARE social stories. A social story is much like a role model or visual plan used to describe a skill or situation in terms of relevant social cues and prompts.

Today social stories are EASY TO IMPLEMENT need no formal training to use and can be edited to suit all terminology and autistic kids no matter where on the spectrum scale they fall.

As one of the major autistic resources used to help teach, support and HELP individuals with autism to overcome social skills deficits social skills stories ARE available to download TODAY from sites like http://www.autismsocialstories.com

A social skills story will answer the important “wh” questions –  who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and nonverbal communications of others helping the autistic child get a handle on the skill or situation which can reduce tantrums, meltdowns and general stress for everyone.

So for example if the family want to visit Granny introducing a social skills story can help describe to the child with autism exactly what to expect reducing anxiety and what is expected of them reducing stress. The social skills story is editable, can be personalized, printed for convenience and is portable so can be popped into a bag making it an ideal autistic support.

Sites which offer IMMEDIATE ACCESS to autism visual supports like social stories and visual support cards for a minimal fee like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  are run by experts, offer social stories and support to families and individuals with autism.

Having autism and finding friends

Wednesday, July 21st, 2010

Many children with autism spectrum disorder do want to make and have friends. But having autism spectrum disorder can make this difficult.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects a persons development in three main areas: social interactions, communication difficulties and imagination skills.

 

These developmental difficulties are referred to as the autism triad of impairments and it is this which hinders children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The autism triad of impairments will vary from child to child as no two children will ever be the same.

 

Some children with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may have little or no language and may have other related disabilities.

 

By contrast for children on the other end of the autism scale, with for example asperger syndrome will often be schooled in mainstream schools and be of average to above average intelligence. It is generally this end of the autism scale, those with asperger syndrome and high functioning autism whom probably desire friendships.

 

For this set of children with asperger syndrome, high functioning autism or mild autism making and maintaining friendships will be a struggle. A staggering fact is that unfortunately it is believed that around 40% of autistic children in mainstream education will at some point be a victim to bullying.

 

A typically developing child in mainstream education will eagerly await recess and break times to let off steam and play with their friends, it is their time to run around and socially interact with their peers and have fun.

 

However for an autistic child, often the sound of the bell can fill them with fear and dread. Autistic children prefer structure, routine and dislike surprises, noises and the unstructured chaos of free time. They find choice making difficult will quite often become overwhelmed by recess and break times.

 

For many autistic children recess is a confusing part of the school day. There are a lot of choices to be made, what to play with, who to play with, what to do, so many choices a normal child will take for granted and enjoy, this is not the case for an autistic child.

 

For example a simple playground game that a typically developing child may enjoy, can be confusing to an autistic child. The autistic child may choose to join in with their peers, but may be unable to follow the rules of the game. For typically developing children this can be frustrating needing to stop and reconfirm the rules constantly. The child on the spectrum will not be deliberately being awkward, they probably do not understand the need for rules, and then just as they start to understand this set of rules, the rules may change, or the game may stop.

 

However, for some children with autism that do understand the rules this may also prove a problem, as they may stick rigidly to the rules which in some cases can take the fun out of the game for the other normally developing children. The typically developing children may simply loose interest and unfortunately the child on the spectrum may not understand why this is and become distressed.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder are hypo or hypersensitive and can become overwhelmed by noise, which can make recess or break time a painful and stressful time. They may be seen pacing up and down in their own little world until recess is over and they can return to the routine and structure of the classroom.

 

All these factors can make autism and finding friends difficult to say the very least.

 

So how can you help with the problem of autism and finding friends?

 

Generally as discussed earlier kids with autism prefer structure and routine, this can be achieved by the use of autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories, these resources are used in the classroom to add structure and routine the child’s day.

 

These autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism cope with recess and break times taking away some of anxieties they may feel around this time of the day.

 

The autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism understand how to maintain friendships, by teaching the autistic child how to use conversation, how to pretend play, how to be kind, respect peoples feelings and personal space, how to share and make choices and so on, all social skills we take for granted, but an autistic child will need to be taught these social skills directly.

 

Therefore the perfect place to start with autism and making friends is with autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories to teach the autistic child the social skills necessary for making and maintaining friendships and dealing with recess and break times.

 

You can find appropriate social skills stories and other autism resources for kids with autism for download at:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Teaching social and communication skills to children with autism

Tuesday, December 29th, 2009

Many parents of children with autism experience communication problems with their autistic child.

 

And trust in autism visual supports such as social skills stories as a strategy for teaching and re-enforcing social skills and behaviors. Many parents of children with autism, care givers and autistic educators use social skills stories and report tremendous successes.

 

In recent studies it was shown that these simple yet effective autism visual supports are used widely, as a tool for HELPING parents of children with autism and autistic educators deal with behavior, communication and social issues their autistic child or student is finding hard to understand or cope with.


Used as autistic visual supports for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism social skills stories can be downloaded and implemented quickly and easily from various sources such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com and are used effectively to teach social skills and behaviors.


The fact is kids with autism are often overwhelmed by noises, sensations, and activities that the rest of us consider “everyday” or “normal” which can lead to communication and autistic behavior difficulties.  Which can then in turn lead to tantrums and on occasion’s violent outbursts. They dislike surprises, and respond well to repetition.

 

This is where many parents of children with autism find social skills stories can be very beneficial to help with teaching social and communication skills to children with autism such as personal space, temper tantrums, violent outbursts, healthy hygiene habits, how to ask questions, how to make friends and many other issues, events, activities and situations are dealt with through the use of social skills stories.

 

Social skills stories are simple, understandable, first-person stories with visual aids that can help to calm and address even the most severe behaviors. Social skills stories work because they put an end to the stress, worry, and anxiety both you and your child with autism feel whenever a routine changes, a new skill needs mastering, or something changes, even something small. They help YOU teach YOUR child with autism vital coping strategies for social skills both everyday and less common.

 

To download and learn more about social skills stories for autistic children and how they are used for teaching social and communication skills to children with autism visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


Or any of the following sites for expertly written social skills stories for autistic children


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Autism visual supports social story touch

Thursday, September 17th, 2009

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder which causes impairments in the way individual’s process information.

 

Autism is characterized by social, communication, imagination and interaction skills deficits which are often referred to as autistic social skills deficits.


Generally all autistic individuals will have difficulties in verbal and non-verbal communication, social interactions. Autism spectrum disorder can make it difficult for autistic individuals to communicate with others and relate to the outside world. In some cases, aggressive and/or self-injuries behavior may be present.

 

Autistic individuals may also experience sensory sensitivities in the five senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, and taste.

 

Generally autistic children and adults tend to be hyper-sensitive or hypo-sensitive.

 

Deficits in autistic sensory sensitivities: Touch, autistic children may have difficulties in discriminating between objects by touch alone, for example they may be unable to locate an object even if it is in their own pocket.

 

Sometimes autistic children will have a high threshold for pain and may injure themselves without realizing they have done so, which can be quite alarming for parents.


Some autistic children will appear clumsy and have poor body awareness which can make them bump into objects and people. Sometimes they may fall down a lot. They may use too much or not enough force when pushing, pulling, lifting or holding on to things even people!

 

They may have poor gross motor movements and poor upper body muscle strength. Some autistic individuals will have difficulties with fine motor skills they will struggle to hold coins or use a zip.

 

Some autistic toddlers can be confused and interpret their mother’s body as part of their own.

 

Some autistic children are sensitive to the feel of certain fabrics and substances they will dislike the tags in their clothes, as well as being touched etc.

 

These are all commonly reported autistic sensory sensitivities issues by parents of autistic children.

 

Parents of autistic children report significant autistic social skills deficits in touch with their autistic children. Social skills stories have been used as a means of helping those individuals with autism that have sensory sensitivities issues find ways of coping with the affects of sensory dysfunctions appropriately.

 

Social skills stories can be used for issues with touch for example an autistic child may be unaware of their own personal and other people’s personal space and insist on standing too close to other people, which can make others feel very uncomfortable using a social story in this situation can be very beneficial.

 

A social story for touch, for example appropriate touching, when it is ok to touch and not ok to touch for example keeping hands to your self and so on.

 

Also, social story touch for sniffing someone’s hair, hitting, dentist and so on all useful for autistic kids with sensory issues.

 

Social stories are widely used by parents of autistic children, teachers and other professionals to help teach and re-enforce essential and daily life social, communication, interaction and imagination skills to children with autism.


To get immediate downloads of various social skills stories for example social story for touch visit sites such as: www.autismsocialstories.com or www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


And gain immediate downloads of social skills stories for children with autism like appropriate touching, personal space and lots more autistic kids benefit from the implementation of social stories.