Archive for the ‘autistic visual supports’ Category

Access Autistic Visual Supports

Friday, March 23rd, 2012

We know that the majority of children with autism spectrum ARE indeed visual thinkers and learners, meaning that they think in images/picture and for the main will better understand visual teachings and information.

It is therefore vital that we aim to teach and provide information more visually. For example using autistic visual supports like flash cards, communication cards and social stories etc…

Access autistic visual supports at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com  there ARE various supports for children with autism spectrum available on this site.

Typically children on the autism spectrum have difficulties with social awareness and communication and will struggle to make sense of the ever changing and unpredictable world which surrounds them. These difficulties are often a major cause for stress and anxiety in many children on the autism spectrum.

By using visual supports for autism YOU can help your child with ASD better cope and understand things and situations which they find difficult, like for example asking questions, sharing, respecting personal space, asking other kids to play and so on…

Autistic visual supports such as social stories ARE designed to show the child with ASD what to expect and what is expected of them. The social story WILL answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and should also offer the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

The often aloof appearance of many children with autism can make them appear selfish, but this is not their intention or the case. This appearance is merely a lack of social awareness skills. Unlike typically developing youngsters the child on the spectrum WILL NOT learn social and communication skills in the normal manner – ie: people watching, from peers and the environment.

For children on the autism spectrum direct teaching is generally needed. This direct teaching is done using autistic visual supports.

Access autistic visual supports to help you teach and calm your child with ASD visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  where you will find immediate downloads of social stories as well as information on how visual supports for autism work.

You will also be able to access autistic visual supports like: communication cards, flash cards and visual social story cards and folders.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

Autistic Visual Supports

Tuesday, February 7th, 2012

Individuals with autism ARE typically “Visual Thinkers – Visual Learners”, this means that they think in pictures and images and use speech / words as a secondary language.

“I think in pictures. Words are like a second language to me…when somebody speaks to me, his words are instantly translated into pictures… One of the most profound mysteries of autism has been the remarkable ability of most autistic people to excel at visual spatial skills while performing so poorly at verbal skills.” (Grandin, 1995).

Therefore presenting information and guidance visually will have a much better impact on individuals with autism.  There are a number of visual supports for autism which WILL help your child on the spectrum learn skills and behaviours that they find confusing, stressful or simply do not understand.

Autistic Visual Supports like: Social Skills Stories, Communication Picture Cards (flash cards), PECS and so on CAN be quickly and easily implemented and need NO formal training to use.

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive visual representations of a skill or behaviour. The social story breaks the skill down into smaller components, removes and un-necessary fluff or language and explains How and why something happens.

The social story answers the “wh” questions – who, what, where, why and when and provides an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with autism.


Autistic Visual Supports – Communication Picture Cards (flash cards)
ARE small laminated cards depicting an image or skill. For eample the Communication Picture Cards can be USED as an exchange –  the child with ASD hands over a picture card in retuen for the item on the card  -for example an apple at snack time and so on.

The Communication Picture Cards are also USED on visual timetables, as pointers around the home or in school, on chices boards, now and next boards and as a communication tool.

Both Social Skills Stories and Communication Picture Cards ARE available from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

To learn more about Autistic Visual Supports and how they can benefit your child with ASD visit today and download Social Skills Stories which can be adapted to suit individual needs, no two children are the smane and we all use different terminology with our kids, therefore it is important that the social story you choose is editable.

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

How do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child?

Friday, January 14th, 2011

Autism will affects a person’s ability to communicate, socially interact and use their imagination skills it also causes sensory processing issues and behavioral difficulties as well as anxiety and stress.

Any anxiety symptoms in autistic children can become worse when changes, transitions or new skills need learning. For most autistic children even positive or fun changes like birthdays or new clothes can cause sensory processing issues, and trigger anxiety in the autistic child.

So how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Parents, caregivers and teachers can become stressed when changes are looming knowing that the change will no doubt trigger anxiety in the autistic child. Methods for dealing with anxiety in autism are the best course of action.

Parents, caregivers and teachers are finding it helpful to use methods for dealing with anxiety in autism such as social stories and autistic visual aids to prepare the child on the spectrum for the upcoming disruption.

Maybe your child is due to visit the doctor or dentist, social stories and autistic visual aids will prepare your child for the impending visit; they can show who he will see at the doctor or dentist, what the doctor will be like, and what sort of things to expect.

This process can help with sensory processing issues and the anxiety of a change to routine.

Consequently on the day of the doctor visit your child on the spectrum will have prepared and practiced the situation and feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

Many parents like the idea of introducing change in a positive way: This can be achieved by practicing change. For example, just for practice, give him a little extra TV time instead of homework time one night, to show that changes in the routine can often be fun and good.

Then step it up a bit by practicing change for example: Change Homework time from after to before dinner. The hardest changes are then introduced swapping for example TV time to chore time. This process can reduce autism anxiety.

Looking at how do you treat anxiety symptoms in autistic child? Sometimes your child’s doctor may prescribe medications to help reduce autism anxiety. You and your doctor should monitor your child’s progress very closely, using the lowest dose of medication possible, to see if what improvements it makes and whether there are any adverse reactions.

Most parents feel that medication should be the last resort. There are plenty of dietary and herbal remedies available which are equally useful in controlling anxiety in autism.

There are many more resources and information about diagnosing, controlling and treating and Autism Anxiety Overload in:

The Essential Guide To Autism

social stories

Autistic visual aids

 

 

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Treatment goals autism

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Research into the latest on autism treatment, shows families and teachers support the uses of visual strategies as a means of teaching and supporting social and communication skills in children with autism.


The priority treatment goals autism are to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues, achievable using autistic visual supports like social stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.


The predominant characteristics of children with autism spectrum disorders are impairments in an individual’s of social skills, communication difficulties and interaction, along with sensory processing issues, restricted and repetitive activities and interests. This is often referred to as social skills deficits or the theory of mind.


Research shows many parents worry about their child’s ability to make and maintain friendships which often proves difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder.


Probably the main treatment goals for autism are to help overcome social skills deficits – the theory of mind and ease family life and stresses, as well as to help the autistic individual to reach their full potential in quality of life and functional independence.


Achievable with the help of services and autistic visual supports and resources designed specifically to help overcome many of the deficits associated with this disorder. Such as social skills stories specifically designed to address social skills deficits and sensory processing issues as well as communication difficulties.

 

Parents report significant improvements in social skills understanding once social skills stories have been implemented.

 

A social story follows a specific pattern of sentence type: descriptive, directive, perspective and control sentences. Social stories were first introduced around twenty years ago as a means of communication, since then their use has expanded and today they are classed as one of the major autistic resources for teaching and supporting social skills learning.


The latest on autism treatment shows a popular increase in the implementation of social stories to address social skills deficits. Social stories are written in first person text, use visual images or pictures and are short descriptive no fluff stories.

 

The goal of the social story is to help the autistic child better understand a social situation, skills, behaviour or communication skill they are struggling to master or cope with.

 

The situation or skill etc. is broken down into relevant social cues with appropriate images in an almost comic like style to show the autistic child by answering the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others.


To learn more about the treatment goals autism and the latest on autism treatments like social skills stories and visual flash cards, Pecs and so on visit sites such as:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids


Autistic visual supports

Sunday, August 8th, 2010

Visual supports are used to help people with autism spectrum disorder. Visual supports should be easy to implement, adaptable and portable, making them convenient and easy to use.


Research suggests that the vast majority of people with autism spectrum disorder are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they can process information easier when it is visual rather than written text or auditory.


Consequently, presenting visual information can help children with autism learn vital everyday living skills and behaviours, including communication skills.

 

Autistic visual supports are useful when teaching children with autism social, communication and imagination skills, as well as helping with transitions, changes to routines and sensory processing issues.

 

Research suggests autistic visual supports such as social skills stories are beneficial and can be adapted to suit all abilities and ages. Social skills stories follow specific patterns. Originally designed twenty years ago as a communication aid, this autistic support has since grown into a major tool in autism today.

 

Social skills stories answer the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of others which helps to reduce stress and anxiety.


Used as a tool in autism for teaching and supporting social and communication skills, social stories are used like a framework or role model explaining and visually showing the skills, situation or behaviour that the autistic individual is struggling to cope with or master.


Editable, printable, needing no formal training to use they can be personalized and adapted to suit any autistic individual. To learn more about social stories and how they are used and implemented to help children with autism learn suitable behaviours and skills visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find important information on social stories their uses and how they benefit children with autism spectrum disorder. There is also support and downloads of appropriate social stories which can be printed for convenience and ease of use. Other sites offering autistic visual supports such as social skills stories can be found at: 

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

 

Autistic visual supports what are they?

Friday, July 16th, 2010

Visual supports are part of our everyday lives, we read newspapers, books, use the internet, watch TV, look at road maps, signs and so on. They are important, the vast majority of us rely on visual supports in our jobs, at school, college and so on, and many of us could not function as effectively without visual supports.

Visual supports can be used to help people with autism spectrum disorder and related conditions in much the same way.

Most autistic individuals are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore presenting information in a visual manner can help encourage and support the communication skills, language development, social skills development, encourage positive behaviours and the ability to process information in people with autism spectrum disorder.

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition which affects a person’s ability in three main areas of development: social interactions, communication – verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills. This is often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments.

The triad of autistic impairments is found in all autistic individuals, but to varying degrees dependant on the individuals own level of development. There is no cure for autism, but there are various methods and treatments for autism available which can help people with autism spectrum address the triad of autistic impairments.

Having a lack of social interaction, communication and imagination skills can be confusing and lead to social isolation and even bullying in many cases. For children with autism it is vital that they are taught appropriate social, communication and imagination skills directly. This is achieved using treatments for autism like autistic visual supports.

So autistic visual supports what are they and where can you find them? There are various treatments for autism like social stories, PECS, flash cards, schedules, communication boards and so on all very good autistic visual supports and all readily available for most parents of autistic children.

The internet is the perfect place to begin looking for supports for children with autism, sites run by behaviour specialists, O.T.,  Language specialists, clinics and so on offer parents of autistic children the chance to order and download various autistic visual supports sometimes for free or for a small fee.

Probable one of the major visual supports for children with autism is social skills stories. A good source of social skills stories is found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Social skills stories are used to teach and encourage social interaction, communication and imagination skills and behaviours as well as address other difficulties that the person on the autism spectrum may be struggling with such as personal hygiene issues, school related difficulties and so on.

 

Social skills stories answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as give an insight into the thoughts, emotions and feelings of others. Using visual images and first person text the social skills story breaks the skill down into relevant social key points giving the person on the autism spectrum a chance to rehearse the skill making it more predictable, therefore reducing anxieties, confusion and stress.

 

Social skills stories are easy to edit; personalize and print making them convenient and easy to use. To find out more about autistic visuals supports what are they visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Social stories for kids with autism

Saturday, January 23rd, 2010

Unlike typically developing children, kids with autism spectrum disorder do not naturally learn social or communication skills.  As typically developing individuals we learn and use verbal and non-verbal communication automatically, we use expression and body language to convey information sometimes without even realizing we are doing so.

 

Using facial expressions and body language we can portray love, happiness, sadness, contentment and fear.

 

Without social and communication skills we would be left confused and inevitably social mistakes and blunders would be the norm. Our interpretations of how or what others are thinking or feeling gives us the ability and knowledge to read what comes next, this ability is missing in autism.

 

Generally for kids with autism spectrum disorder the world is confusing, and with a lack of social and communication skills their ability to be understood or communicate can be hindered and often confused.

 

Unlike their typically developing peers the autistic child finds it difficult to read situations or interpret expression and non verbal communications. For kids with autism social prompts are easily missed or mistaken, their ability to understand behaviors such as sharing, taking turns even making friends is impaired and in some cases completely missing.

 

Therefore parents, care givers, teachers and other people involved with the care of kids with autism find great relief in autistic visual supports that can help them to teach the autistic child social and communication skills effectively.


Autistic visual supports such as social stories for kids with autism were developed around twenty years ago to help re-enforce and teach social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The images and pictures used in social stories for kids with autism are powerful re-enforcers, and as such are probably the most significant resource used for teaching appropriate social and communication skills to kids with autism spectrum disorder.

 

Autistic visual supports such as social skills stories for kids with autism provide visual cues and representations along with appropriate text. The social skills stories for kids with autism also provide support and understanding using appropriate language, written in first person text from the autistic person’s point of view. Social stories use a specific defined formula.

 

Research shows us significant numbers of autistic children benefit from the implementation of social skills stories for kids with autism and therefore many teachers, parents and other professionals now rely on these autistic visual supports to help them teach and re-enforce social and communication skills.

 

 

To get more information on autistic visual supports and download social skills stories visit any of the following site:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

Resources and students with autism

Tuesday, October 20th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by significant deficits in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills, abilities and behaviors.

 

Students with autism spectrum disorder range in abilities and disabilities, from students with autism spectrum disorder that have severe intellectual disabilities to students that are intellectually gifted. With appropriate resources all students with autism can learn.

 

Although some autistic students may present educational disabilities and challenges, appropriate resources and students with autism can help them learn well, teacher implement systematic, and individualized teaching practices. As well as appropriate autistic resources such as PECS, daily schedules and social stories for autistic students.

 

Teachers of autistic students can help their autistic students by providing clear structure to the environment. Provide autistic resources and tools such as PECS, schedules and social stories ensure that the flow of lessons and activities is understandable and predictable.


Teachers of autistic students should have a clear focus on building and developing social and communication skills. This will help the student with autism develop skills for their current and future life in school, college, work, home, and community.


Students with autism display deficits in understanding and using speech as well as communication both verbal and non-verbal.


All autism classroom accommodations need to be expressed in a way that the student with autism can understand. This can be achieved through the use of schedules and social skills stories for autistic students.


Autistic children tend to be visual learners. In addition to providing autistic visual supports for understanding classroom expectations, many students with autism spectrum disorder will also need autistic visual supports to help them find means of communicating both verbally and non-verbally.

 

Generally all students with autism will have deficits with communication and may display difficulties expressing their needs and desires.


Teachers are finding the use of autistic visual supports such as social skills stories is helping students with autism cope within the school and classroom environment more efficiently. Social skills stories are actually helping students understand autism classroom accommodations easier as well as the rules of the school, plus what is expected of them throughout the day.

 

Social skills stories are used widely for autistic children and can now be downloaded straight from the internet. Sites offering autistic students school resources such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

Are easy to navigate and offer excellent support to teachers of autistic students as well as parents and other professionals; resources and students with autism.

 

Other sites offering downloads of social stories include:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school