Archive for the ‘children with autism spectrum disorder’ Category

Visual method to teach social skills to children with autism

Monday, October 9th, 2017

A child with Autism will not set out intentionally to misbehave or cause stress or upset to anyone, simply out of fun or mischief.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder that affects the way the individual processes information, communicates, uses language, thinks, acts, reacts and uses their imagination. These common characteristics of autism are called social skills deficits.

 

The common characteristics of autism will often make the child appear rude, aloof even arrogant at times. However this is not intentional, an individual with autism spectrum disorder will be brutally honest and say as they see it, be uninterested in appearing cool and oblivious to public opinion.

 

Using a visual method to teach social skills to children with autism is useful. Research suggests an improvement in social behaviour can be seen when social stories are introduced.

 

Using social stories can improve communication issues and help the child with Autism understand behaviours like pretend play, and making friends. Social stories are short descriptive narratives like a social script or framework for the skills or behaviour needing to be taught.

 

They use images to help show what is happening and what is expected of them. Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as offering an insight into the verbal and non verbal communications of others, social skills stories can help support as well as teach social and communications skills, thus reducing stress and inappropriate behaviours.

 

To learn more about how to use this visual method to teach social skills to children with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Using Visual Supports for Autism at Christmas

Friday, November 4th, 2016

For many children with autism spectrum disorder Christmas can be a time of high stress and confusion.

Autism social stories for Christmas,Intervention Strategies such as Social Skills Stories for Christmas

With changes to routines at home and at school, many autistic children can suffer sensory overload. Triggering “meltdowns” and anxiety

As any parent with an autistic child knows, any change to routines can cause problems

“Intervention Strategies such as Social Skills Stories for Christmas ARE used with GREAT effect”

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, where, when and why and give the child with autism clear coping strategies for this time of year!

Visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/christmas/index.html

How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic deficits

What are Autistic Deficits?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

 

Tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Friday, October 11th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder have social deficiencies these are common to autism; it is due to these social deficiencies that the autistic child may be unaware of the rules of social conduct, how to act in public or interactions. Even though all autistic individuals have social deficiencies the level of disability and the combination of symptoms will vary from person to person.

 

Having social deficiencies is common to autism and at times can leave the autistic child open to bullying especially at school.

 

For many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder understanding language can also cause problems.

 

Generally kids with autism that display communication difficulties will misunderstand simple directions or questions and may take what is said too literally. For example; metaphors, humour, sarcasm, irony and other figures of speech (such as “watch what you say”) can all be confusing.

 

Due to their social deficiencies sometimes kids with autism can come across as rude or aloof. But while they may appear emotionally flat, the reality is that autistic child is far from unfeeling. What may appear like indifference or insensitivity is actually due to social impairments, the inability to see things as other people do.

 

However using treatments of autism for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder will be beneficial.

 

There are many treatments of autism available with social skills stories being probably the most significant for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 

Social Skills Stories are used effectively by parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals to help improve and teach social, imagination and interaction skills and behaviours as well as addressing communication difficulties, in children with autism.

 

Social skills stories are treatments of autism that are easy to implement and need no formal training to use, they can be downloaded from the internet or provided by your child’s OT, speech therapist and sometimes school.

 

Social skills stories help overcome social deficiencies by tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, by helping the child with autism learn appropriate social skills and behaviours.

 

The autism social skills story provides the child with a step by step visual plan detailing the key points or goals, allowing them a chance to rehearse the skill or behaviour they are struggling with. Which will make the child feel more comfortable with and in the situation they are struggling with and less likely to become stressed or agitated.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for tackling social and communication problems in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

 

 

 

 

 

Autism and play in preschool children

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

In a study of preschool children with autism spectrum disorder it was found that this set of children were disadvantaged in the way they play.

Characteristically preschool children with autism spectrum disorder find it difficult to play as a normally developing child would. This lack of play skills can aggravate the child’s social isolation from their peers, and only underline their differences from other children.

So what is play?

  • Play should be fun and enjoyable.
  • Play should have no set goals imposed on it from outside influences; it should be imaginative and sometimes impulsive.
  • play should be spontaneous and voluntary
  • play should involve some kind of active involvement on the part of the player
  • play can be solitary or enjoyed with friends

The Development of play

Children’s play should go through a number of developmental stages

  • Sensory motor play, stimulation from objects, for example a baby gym.
  • exploratory and manipulative play, for example Lego
  • physical play including rough and tumble
  • social play, playing with their peers, playground play
  • pretend play or make believe

Why do children need to play?

Play allows our children to learn new skills and practice them in safe supportive surroundings.

Sensory motor play teaches babies and young infants about their own bodies and about objects in their immediate surroundings. The bright colored toys stimulate the babies mind and he/she will reach out to grab and explore the toy.

Manipulative and exploratory play teaches older infants about various objects, what they do; sound like, how they react together and how they influence the world they are living in.

Physical play, rough and tumble play, teaches toddlers and pre-school children some gross motor skills, which will provide them with the experiences of whole body interaction with others.

Social play is vast right from the mother and baby interactions to children’s make believe play, for example, playing mummy’s and daddy’s, which teaches children about social relationships in the world they live in.

Typically the autistic child on the other hand likes repetition and things to stay the same, and may display stereotypical, repetitive and stimming behaviors, mostly their play will be solitary.

Preferring their own company to that of others, an autistic child will find interactive, make believe play strange and may not understand the reasons for this kind of play.

So how do you help your Autistic child play?

One method it through direct teaching, typically children on the autism spectrum do not learn play skills naturally and like social and communication skills direct teaching is often needed.

One method of direct teaching for children on the autism spectrum is the use of social stories for autistic children.

Significantly social stories for autistic children can be implemented to help teach and re-enforce play skills and other skills the child with autism struggles with.

Social stories are short explanations using visual images, much like a comic script to detail the skill or situation from the child’s own point of view and in a manner that they will understand.

Social stories for autistic children follow set patterns, are generally easy to use and implement need no training to use and will be editable making them ideal for all.

To view and learn more about how social stories visit:

www.autismsocialstories.com

Social Stories for ASD Students

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers and learners, which means that they think in pictures and use speech / language as secondary.

Having this knowledge can make teaching the ASD student much easier. Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories for ASD students ARE used with great affect.

A social story is written to describe a situation, skill or behaviour in terms of the relevant social cues. The social story is typically always written from the ASD students perspective and will give an accurate description of the skill, situation or behaviour.

The goal of the social stories for ASD students is to help the student feel more comfortable with and in the situation. Social stories for ASD students ARE written to help children with autism spectrum manage their own behaviour during a specific social situation by describing and answering the “wh” questions where the activity will take place, when it will occur, what will happen, who is involved, and why the child should behave in a certain way.

The social story will also give the child on the spectrum an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most kids with ASD.

Social stories should ideally follow a specific sentence pattern of: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and Control sentences in a defined manner.

Social stories for ASD students should USE visual images / pictures and be editable, no two kids with ASD will ever be the same and we all use different terminology within our own classroom, therefore editability is important to personalize and make the story relevant to each child on the spectrum.

When the social story is first implemented, the teacher must be certain that the ASD student understands the social story and the skill being taught. Once the teacher has read through the story a few times with the child the ASD student can then read the story independently, read it aloud to an adult, or listen as the adult reads the story. The most appropriate method is dependent upon the individual abilities and needs of the ASD student.

Visual Intervention Strategies like social stories for ASD students can be used for various situations and skills for example: Recess, Assembley, Shared reading, Taking turns, Asking other kids to play, Circle Time and so on. For a full list available for immediate download visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Alternativelly visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com
http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Autism Supports and Treatments

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

A diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder can come a s a great shock to many parents.

It is thought that an average of 1 in every 150 babies is going to be given a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder before they attend school, this number is astonishing. Research into autism suggests that there is no one reason for autism, and that there is no cure.

While there is no cure for autism spectrum disorder, there are various autism supports and treatments available that can and will help with the symptoms of autism.

Autism supports and treatments can help  with disruptive behaviors, and teach self-help skills that allow for greater independence.  So what are the main symptoms of autism? social awareness deficits, communication difficulties both in verbal and non-verbal communication, imagination skills deficits as well as some stereotypical behaviours and sensory processing issues.

Autism supports and treatments ARE often reffered to as “Intervention Strategies”

Which Intervention Strategies will work for your child is mainy dependant on your child’s own personal abilities. No two children with autism spectrum disorder will ever be the same, and therefore the approach will be different. However one of the most significant treatments of autism is Social Skills Stories and ARE adaptable to suit all.

Social Skills Stories ARE used to help teach social awareness skills, deal with communication difficulties and help the child on the spectrum overcome many of the symptoms of autism that they display.

Social skills stories ARE short descriptive stories which detail a skill or behaviour from the child’s own perspective, breaking the skill or behaviour down into small relevant chunks that the child on the spectrum can understand.

The social story looks much like a comic script with visual images and small pices of first person text. Typically children with autism spectrum disorder ARE visual thinkers, this means that they think in pictures and will gain far more from visual intervention strategies like social  stories, PECS, flash cards and so on.

Commonly visual intervention strategies like the social story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will also provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children with autism spectrum disorder.

To implement social skills stories for autism and to learn more about what autism supports and treatments are avauilable visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Alternatively you will find immediate download of socials stories for autism from: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills