Archive for the ‘people with autism’ Category

Social Stories for people with Autism

Monday, May 21st, 2012

Social stories are short explanations of a specific behaviour, skill, situation, event or activity showing/detailing definite information about what to expect in that situation and why.

Social skills stories ARE treatments for autism which CAN be used for a wide variety of difficulties including:

Transitions

Making choices

Teaching self-help/hygiene skills

Preparing for changes to routines

Making and maintaining friendships

Dealing with skills/behaviours which cause stress and anxiety

Sudden changes/unexpected circumstances – such as a death, birth etc.

The social skills story will explain visually what is happening/about to happen and why, by breaking the skill/behaviour down into smaller relevant pieces, the “social cues”.

So for example the social skills story will aim to answer the important “wh” questions – what, where, why, when and who as well as “HOW” it will also attempt to give an insight into the thoughts and feelings of any other people affected or involved. Understanding the thoughts, feelings and emotions of other people is an area of considerable weakness for most people with autism spectrum disorder.

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder tend to be predominantly visual thinkers and learners which indicates that treatments for autism the visual support tools, resources and information should be visual. It is therefore believed that visual support tools like social skills stories ARE generally the best form of teaching/support tool.

Social Stories for people with Autism can be downloaded and used with great affect from sites such as www.autismsocialstories.com. You will also find visual social story cards and folders as well as other visual support tools such as picture communication cards/flash cards, behaviour plans and charts as well as freebies and a comprehensive parent page.

Visit www.autismsocialstories.com

Building autistic social skills

Monday, April 23rd, 2012

Autism is a developmental disorder which has no known cure. That said THERE ARE plenty of excellent resources which can be used to help those diagnosed autistic.

Characteristically those diagnosed autistic WILL have social and communication difficulties, this is due to social skills deficits which ARE apparent in all people with autism but to varying degrees.

Typically people with autism WILL prefer visual information and teaching, it is therefore believed that resources and teaching styles should be more visual.

This is easily achieved through the use of visual resources for autism such as social skills stories, PECS, picture communication cards and so on…

Using visual resources for autism is beneficial, and typically will need no formal training to implement and use.

For example social skills stories ARE visual resources for autism which ARE used specifically for building autistic social skills and helping to overcome communication and social awareness difficulties.

Having social skills deficits can be challenging for many children on the autism spectrum and can at times even lead to extreme behaviours, even bullying.

So how does the social story work?

The social skills story is a short visual story much like a comic script which is used as a visual framework or step by step detailed plan of the skill or situation that the child on the autism spectrum is finding hard.

Many children on the autism spectrum struggle with the chaos of recess, by implementing a social skills story the child will have a concrete plan of recess. This plan WILL explain what is happening and why, which WILL help the child on the autism spectrum cope and feel more comfortable.

Social skills stories show the skill or situation from the child’s own point of view and use first person text. The social skills story describes the situation using images and short descriptive sentences or words.

The social story should answer the “wh” questions:-who, what, why, when and where. The social skills story should also answer “how” and provide an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most children on the autism spectrum.

To view and learn more about visual resources for autism like social skills stories for building autistic social skills and to access immediate downloads visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Autistic Supports

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012

Autistic supports ARE used to help people with autism learn or remember social and communication skills and behaviours.

There ARE various supports for autism, but probably the most significant of the autistic supports ARE VISUAL.

Typically people with autism ARE VISUAL thinkers and learners this means that they USE visual images/pictures as their first language and speech/ words as secondary.

Therefore it is commonly believed that the most BENEFICIAL autistic supports ARE VISUAL. For example:

Social stories

Visual social story cards and folders

PECS

Communication cards – flash cards

…And so on…

For the purpose of this article we are looking at SOCIAL STORIES

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports which were first introduced around twenty years ago to teach communication skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.

Today social stories for autism ARE widely used by teachers and parents to not only teach but re-enforce social, communication and imagination skills and behaviours.

A social story is a short descriptive story which looks much like a comic script. The social story WILL describe a skill or situation from the perspective of the child with autism.

Social stories for autism ARE visual autistic supports that use images/pictures to detail what is happening and why. Acting like a visual framework or plan the social story WILL answer the “wh” questions – who, what, why, when and where as well as “HOW” and will offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most kids with autism.

To learn more about social stories for autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate downloads of 100 social stories for kids with autism

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Social awareness skills ARE not naturally learnt by young people with autism, unlike their typically developing peers children with autism DO NOT people watch and lack the ability to naturally learn skills the rest of us take for granted.

Many young people with autism struggle with friendships and find social interaction difficult to master this can lead to misunderstandings and at times social isolation.

Teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism CAN be achieved using Intervention Strategies like social stories, flash cards, PECS and so on…

Using Intervention Strategies is beneficial and has been proven to work.

Typically people with autism tend to be VISUAL thinkers and learners which means they think in pictures and images. Therefore teaching strategies should be predominantly visual, like social stories for example.

The social story is a short visual representation of a skill, situation or behaviour that the child with autism is struggling to master.

The social story breaks the skill into smaller pieces and describes the skill by means of first person text and visual images/pictures. It WILL act like a visual plan or framework which WILL help the child with autism to feel more comfortable and less stressed, confused or anxious.

Social stories answer the “WH” questions – who, what, where, when and why as well as “HOW” and offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of marked weakness in most people with autism.

Social stories ARE used for teaching communication and social skills to young people with autism such as: asking other kids to play, asking questions, having a conversation, being able to listed and so on…

No two children with autism will ever be the same and we all use different terminology, therefore it is important that the social story you are using is editable like the social stories found at http://www.autismsocialstories.com

The social story needs to also be written from the child’s own perspective and be printable.

Visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com for immediate download of 100 social skills stories for various skills, behaviours, activity: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Other social stories CAN be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

Teaching children on the autism spectrum

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Many people with autism are visual thinkers, this means they think in pictures rather like a DVD running through their imagination, pictures being their first language, and words (spoken and written)  being their second language.

 

Therefore teaching children on the autism spectrum is made a whole deal easier if the teaching is done pictorially or visually.

 

Rather than string together long sentences or display written instruction try to use more visual prompts such as diagrams, pictures, graphs and images when teaching.

 

Avoid long strings of verbal instructions. People with autism have problems with remembering the sequence this a common symptom of autism.

 

Using visual supports like visual support cards, PECS and social stories are excellent visual supports for children on the autism spectrum. For example children with autism have difficulties with social and communication skills; this is a common symptom of autism and is present in all children on the autism spectrum.

 

Having difficulties with social and communication skills is referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

The triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits affect three main areas of development: Social skills, Communication skills and Imagination skills.

 

Using social stories as an Intervention strategy parents, teachers, care givers and other professionals are able to combat difficulties with the individual’s autistic impairments.

 

For example many children with autism struggle with transitions, changes to routines, reading emotions and expressions, learning skills, behaviours, communication and imagination. A social skills story can target the difficulty and visually show a detailed plan for tackling the situation.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip visually representing the skill or situation being taught, like a role model or visual plan. The social story will break the skill down into easy to understand sections, removing un-necessary language and fluff.

 

Social stories answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and will give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is a marked difficulty for most people with autism.

 

The social skills story uses visual images or pictures to explain the skill or situations and first person appropriate language always written from the autistic child’s point of view.

 

Most social stories are written in word format making them easy to edit and personalize, as none of us use the same terminology with our children and no two social story are ever going to be the same therefore social stories should be easy to edit.

 

Social stories should also be convenient to use, printable social stories for children with autism are available from reputable sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Where you will find printable social stories for children with autism on a wide variety of issues such as: hygiene, for school, at home and for occasions and activities like visiting the dentist, getting a haircut and transitions such as moving school and house as well as for everyday skills like making friends.

 

To find downloads of social stories for kids with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Research Information about Autism and Supplementation

Thursday, January 13th, 2011

People with autism are especially prone to nutritional difficulties. Therefore, taking supplements to achieve a balanced nutritional state can be beneficial.

 

Nutrition and supplements are an important part of our lives; our bodies need certain nutrients to stay healthy. There are literally thousands of products on the market that can give your body the added nutrients it needs.

 

For people with autism however addressing autism and supplementation is not easy. For the majority of people with autism the proteins gluten and casein have been found to potentially worsen the symptoms of autism.


Research Information about Autism and Supplementation suggests in some cases, gluten and casein have in-fact increased the brains production of natural opiates, making foods that contain them practically addictive!

 

The vast majority of children on the spectrum are influenced by routines, which can be a real problem if unhealthy foods have crept into their diets!  And many parents will struggle to implement a balanced and healthy diet, therefore if a balanced healthy diet is implemented early, it is far easier for children on the spectrum to stick to it.


Your child’s doctor will be able to determine whether your child is getting the right balance of nutrients, by doing a simple blood test. The data from the test will show whether supplements or changes to diet are needed.

 

Defeat Autism Now! (DAN!) Medical Professionals are a good place to start because they have been especially trained to understand the challenges facing autistic children.

 

You may find your ASD child is lacking some of the common supplements that autistic children are often lacking or simply do not have at optimum levels of such as:

Selenium,

Calcium,

Magnesium,

Zinc,

Folinic acids,

Vitamins C and E,

Essential fatty acid,

Taurine, and various amino acids.


If you are about to begin giving supplements to your ASD child remember this should be done slowly, children with autism dislike changes, even those which are doing them some good.


It is a good idea at this stage to keep a diary of any behaviour changes the supplements have which can be discussed this with your doctor or nutritionist.


Research Information about Autism and Supplementation shows us in terms of positive and negative effects the result from the use of supplements, and a change in diet can be:

 

Positive changes:

Many parents of children with autism report a reduction in the severity of behaviours.

Many parents of children with autism report an improvement in managing behaviours and social interaction, which is a marked weakness in autism.

 

At this stage it is also important to note regressions in behaviour. If negative behaviours are observed, the supplement added should be reduced or eliminated.


Negotiating the diet and supplementation of an autistic child is a trial and error undertaking.

 

It is recommended that when first LOOKING INTO the diet and supplementation of an autistic child parents start small only purchasing in small quantities, if you buy a ton of a supplement that produces undesired results, you are stuck with a useless product.

 

It is important to work with your doctor or nutritionist, don’t just dole out supplements on an experimental basis; THIS CAN HAVE A DAMAGING AFFECT. Work with a doctor or a nutritionist to come up with a specific plan that is geared toward your child’s success.

 

This regiment should include frequent tests for metal toxicity, stool analysis, and tests for various amino acids and peptides.

 

There is much to think about when considering supplements for your autistic child. This process is very important and can improve the overall quality of their life.

You should not rush into changes with supplements for your autistic child, children on the spectrum dislike changes!

 

Give supplements time to work. Just as with your body it will take time for your child’s body to reap the benefit of a healthy diet and nutrition routine.

 

There are many more resources and information about autism: such as diagnosing, controlling and treating Autism in: The Essential Guide To Autism

 

 

FREE ReportGrab Your Free Report Today

What every parent should know about the medication we give our children

What is safe and what is not!

Plus when to call the Doctor and important question YOU OUGHT TO ASK

Plus a section on Natural Remedies

Download Your FREE Report NOW!

PLUS – Grab Your Exclusive “Fun Package” Offer

Fun PackageThe “Fun Package” includes:

32 Ways To Keep Your Kids Busy

101 Craft Project Ideas

Part Games For Kids of ALL Ages (including Adults)

Fun Arts and Crafts For ALL Children

Gift Basket Ideas – but not necessarily in a Basket!!

Download The FREE Report and “Fun Package” Today

 

Fun Package“The Healthy Eating Guide”

Nutritional Information

Advice and Top Tips

What is Good for YOU and what is NOT?

This Guide can be YOURS FREE with any Download of social stories for autism and diet at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/diet

 

 

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010

Unlike typically developing children, a child on the spectrum WILL ONLY display inappropriate or odd behaviours for a reason an internal or external factor, NOT out of boredom, mischief or simply for the hell of it!

 

Generally individuals on the spectrum ARE visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore, when considering techniques and strategies which can help combat autistic behaviour difficulties those techniques and methods should be VISUAL.

 

Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories can have a profound effect for children on the spectrum helping overcome many of the difficulties they face daily.

 

Deficits in social, communication and imagination skills ARE a common weakness in autism, and the major reason for most autistic behaviour difficulties.

 

All individuals on the spectrum WILL certainly have deficits in social, communication and imagination skills. However the degree of deficits will depend on the autistic individual.

 

Commonly, Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties ARE implemented by parents, in schools, colleges and can be used to HELP a child on the spectrum UNDERSTAND AND COPE with a situation, event or skill that is causing them distress, confusion or fear.

 

Social Skills Stories WILL encourage positive behaviours, and reduce unwanted and negative situations and behaviours.

 

Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties can be downloaded from http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior  

 

A social story will act as a role model, like a visual framework detailing the key points of the skills or behaviour and showing visually what is happening.

 

Answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of weakness for people with autism.

 

Generally people with autism have difficulties understanding that other people may not share their interests and may have different opinions. By using Social Skills Stories for autistic behaviour difficulties YOU can help the individual with an ASD realise that people are all different with varying opinions and likes and dislikes.

 

Social Skills Stories are short descriptive pieces of first person text with visual images showing a skill in visual comic like fashion allowing the individual with an ASD to practise the skill or behaviour, helping them feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

To learn more about popular Intervention Strategies for autistic behaviour difficulties such as Social Skills Stories visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior where you will find information on social skills stories as well as downloads of appropriate social stories for autistic behaviour difficulties

 

Other sites with social stories can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.insideautisticminds.com

Learning self help hygiene skills in autism

Sunday, December 19th, 2010

For people with autism learning self help hygiene skills can sometimes be problematic. This is due to deficits in social skills which is a common symptom of autism. 

 

As typically developing individuals we naturally learn hygiene routines from watching our parents, our peers and from our environment etc., this is not the case for individuals with autism and direct teaching is necessary.

 

Typically people with autism have sensory processing issues also a common symptom of autism, having autism also affects the way individuals with autism process information, think, react also act and behave.

 

A child with ASD that has developed sufficient self-help skills is more likely to be integrated into a mainstream classroom, and less likely to be teased for inappropriate behaviours.

 

Research shows us that the majority of children with autism are visual thinkers and learners, meaning they think in pictures. Therefore any Intervention Strategies used for children with autism to provide information or instruction is generally better when presented visually.

 

For example Intervention Strategies which ARE visual such visual support cards, PECS, and social stories ARE USED with positive results. Probably the most popular Intervention Strategy for learning self help hygiene skills in autism is Social Stories.

 

Social stories are a tool for improving positive behaviours and skills in a child with ASD. A social skills story is a short descriptive explanation in visual format and first person text used as a visual plan or framework of a skill or behaviour that needs teaching or mastering.

 

A social skills story is much like a comic strip conversation. The social skills story breaks the skill into smaller easier to understand sections and should focus on the key social cues, answering the important “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

 

Social Stories also provide the ASD individual with possible solutions and suggestions as well as showing them what others are expecting of them, as well as what the ASD individual can expect from others.

 

Learning self help hygiene skills in autism using Social Stories has proven effective. Developed twenty years ago social skills stories can be implemented to help with not only self help and hygiene skills but also other social or communication skills the ASD individual may be struggling with.

 

To find out more about social stories and how they may benefit people with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Alternatively other social stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/socialskills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

Improving self help hygiene skills in autism

Friday, April 16th, 2010

Hygiene is an essential life skill; people with autism may need to learn this essential life skill directly. As typically developing individuals we learn hygiene routines through watching our parents, our environment, our peers and school. For individuals with autism learning any social or behavioural skill is not done in the typical manner.

 

Due to social skills deficits people with autism do not process information in a typical manner, neither do they people watch, or absorb information from their environment. This is why direct teaching for improving self help hygiene skills in autism is proving necessary.

 

A child with ASD that has developed sufficient self-help skills is more likely to be integrated into a regular classroom setting and have better experiences with peers.

 

Research shows us that social and communication skills and behaviours are improved in individuals with autism when the necessary information is presented visually. For example information is given and absorbed far easier with visual cues such as support aids, cards, PECS, and social stories.

 

Social stories are used as a tool in improving positive behaviours and skills for individuals with autism. A simple social story is a short visual description using visual images as a framework of a skill or behaviour that needs teaching or mastering.

 

A simple social story describes the skill or behaviour through text and images much like a comic strip conversation be detailing only the important social cues, as well as answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and by providing the ASD individual with possible solutions and suggestions as well as showing them what others are expecting of them, as well as what they can expect from those around them.

 

Studies into the effectiveness of direct social skills teaching suggests that social stories are effective in teaching and improving self help hygiene skills in autism.

 

To find out more about social stories and how they may benefit any ASD individual visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

 

Alternatively other social stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

Communication goals for children with autism

Friday, January 15th, 2010

For the majority of us our speech and language develops during the first three years of our lives.

 

However this is not the case for people with autism. Experts believe that the difficulties in speech and language development that are almost always present in individuals with autism are due to a variety of reasons occurring before, during or after birth. It is because of the autistic individuals lack of speech and language skills that they find it difficult to interact with the world around them effectively.

 

As with typically developing children no two autistic individuals are ever going to be the same, therefore the degree of communication problems will vary. Most individuals with autism have difficulty understanding and using language, as well as problems with word and sentence meaning, intonation, and rhythm.

 

Many people with autism use echolalia, a repetition of something previously heard. For example with immediate echolalia the autistic individual will repeat a question like “Do you want something to drink?” instead of replying with a “yes” or “no.” With delayed echolalia people with autism may say “Do you want something to eat?” when they are asking for food.

 

Generally people with autism have difficulties with eye contact and attention span and are often unable to use gestures for example pointing, sign language and to assist verbal communication.

 

Therefore many parents, care givers and teachers believe communication goals for children with autism should be made a priority.

 

There are various treatments and methods available for helping to encourage affective communication in children with autism, things like visual aids for autism, PECS and social stories. These help the child with autism understand and cope with communication and social skills they struggle with like asking questions, taking turns, sharing, making friends as well as other skills such as following school rules, recess etc.

 

Research into communication goals for children with autism shows social skills stories are an affective tool for teaching communication skills.


These short descriptive, visual stories are used to help the child with autism understand and manage communication and social difficulties. Developed almost twenty years ago the social skills stories are much like a step by step visual plan describing visually the skill being taught or mastered, showing the what, why, where and when helping the child with autism feel more comfortable with and in the situation.

 

You can instantly download social skills stories for any child with autism that have been expertly written, following the recommended formula, from sites such as http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or from sites such as: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

 

The symptoms of mild autism

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurobiological disorder, there is no cure for autism and typically the symptoms of autism will be ongoing throughout the autistic person’s life.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by varying degrees of autistic impairments often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

These social skills deficits are typically displayed in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills and abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors.

 

The symptoms of autism range from mild autism which is often called asperger syndrome to severe autism or low functioning autism.

 

The symptoms of mild autism can vary between individuals on the spectrum. Although all children on the autism spectrum disorder scale may exhibit some similar traits not every child will display all of characteristics associated with autism.

 

A child with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may never develop speech or it may be delayed and may have other educational disabilities, while a child with autism on the higher end of the autism scale can be high-functioning with average or above average intelligence and attend mainstream school.

 

Some autistic children have sensory processing issues in some or all of the senses and may display sensory processing issues such as being sensitive to the feel of fabric so much so that all tags must be cut out of clothing before they will wear it. Another child with autism may display no sensory issues at all.


However, all children with autism spectrum disorder will display social skills deficits with communication whether your child has the symptoms of mild autism or severe they will all have communication both verbal and non-verbal communication skills difficulties.

 

A child with autism will have difficulties relating to other people and will fail to understand non-verbal communication or body language.


Children with autism spectrum disorder are often referred to as having “mind blindness” or lacking the “theory of mind”. This means missing the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions expressed by other people.


For example we can tell a lot by a person’s posture, we can tell whether they are approachable, upset or happy, this ability to read another person is missing in people with autism.


However there are treatments available to people with autism that can help them learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

The internet makes finding appropriate autism resources that help autistic people learn these social skills much easier. Generally most autistic people have found tremendous successes with autism resources such as social skills stories.

 

The symptoms of mild autism are such that generally most autistic children or asperger syndrome individuals can use social skills stories efficiently for coping and understanding social skills that they otherwise struggle to comprehend, which can sometimes lead to social blunders and stressful situations.


Sites that offer downloads OF SOCIAL SKILLS STORIES as well as expert advice and support like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com