What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is probably one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Your child receiving a diagnosis of autism is probably going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will certainly have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” which are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Typically children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child the child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

 

Normally developing children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers etc. which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

As a general rule all parents, teachers, guardians, teachers and care givers use autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum.

 

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language always from the child’s point of view, using first person text and visually rich social stories for autism explain the why, what, where and when and how to the autism child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and obtain info and downloads of various social skills stories for autism

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

Receiving a diagnosis of autism

 

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

Receiving a diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Children on the autistic spectrum do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with children on the autistic spectrum.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autism child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after receiving a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children on the autistic spectrum learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, having autism and making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to children on the autistic spectrum. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the child with ASD always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the child with ASD.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like having autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

After a diagnosis of autism

Autism is probably one of the most frequent developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born getting a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be testing to accept, the autism child will undoubtedly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically budding children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The autistic child lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents describe after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their autistic child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

Social skills stories for autistic behaviors

A major issue for parents of autistic children is their concern that a lack of appropriate social and communication skills both verbal and non-verbal in their autism child will greatly hinder their development and ability to function in a “normal society”

Generally speech is quite often delayed in the autism child but will develop, with the percentage of autism children completely non-verbal being only 9%.

 

Social skills deficits in social and communication skills are common to all autism children. However there are autism treatments that parents of autistic children report provide a substantial improvement in their child’s social and communication skills development, which can help the autistic child develop and fit in with society with less of a struggle.

 

Probably one of the major autism treatments is social skills stories for autistic behaviors. These were first introduced almost twenty years ago to help facilitate social and communication issues reducing stress and anxieties in the autistic child or adult.


Significant numbers of parents of autistic children, care givers and teachers report that the use social stories to teach social and communication skills greatly improves positive behaviors and helps the autistic child reach his/her full potential socially.

 

There are many sites run by experts in autism offering autism treatments such as social skills stories for autistic behaviors, one such site is: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior

 

Social skills stories are now probably one of the major coping techniques for autistic behaviors used by parents of autistic children to help re-enforce skills and behaviors to the child with autism from everyday skills such as asking questions, listening and being a good sport to more complex skills and behaviors like, calming down, appropriate touching and lying.

 

Social skills stories are believed to improve social and communication skills in the child with autism plus personal and social development as well as reducing undesirable behaviors.

 

To find out more about social stories for autism as major coping techniques for autistic behaviors visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/behavior


Life after a diagnosis of autism

A diagnosis of autism is not the end of the world; autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders today with 1 in every 150 children receiving a diagnosis of autism.

 

Scientists still have no cure for autism, but strive to find answers to the burning questions what is autism and how is it cured?

 

So as we know it what is autism and how do we cope and move forward with life after a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder? Autism spectrum disorder is a complex set of autism symptoms or characteristics all pertaining to the way a child develops (brain) the autism symptoms or characteristics affect the way a child develops in the triad of autistic impairments.

 

Put simply the triad of autistic impairments are deficits in the way the autism child develops skills and behaviors their social, communication, imagination and interaction skills will be poor and not develop in the normal way.


For typically developing children these skills develop naturally without us needing to really put much thought and effort into their development, for example typically developing children will be naturally inquisitive, will want physical contact, can make eye contact, will quickly learn to point, will crawl, stand, play, and want the interaction of peers and family members.

 

For the autism child these natural skills need to be encouraged and will need direct teaching.

 

Although there is no cure for autism there are treatments for autism that make the life of the autism child much easier and allow them to develop to their full potential. Autism spectrum disorder is not a mental disorder, but that said some kids with autism, those on the lower end of the autism spectrum scale may not develop speech or it may develop late and may display educational difficulties.

 

Generally those kids with autism on the higher end of the autism spectrum scale will be of average to above average intelligence and you may here them referred to as “the little professor” or “geeks”.

 

One of the major treatments for autism that can really help the autism child and parent is social stories. These can help bridge that gap and teach the social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors that the rest of us take for granted.

 

Since their development almost twenty years ago treatment for social skills deficits in autism has moved forward in huge leaps and bounds. Parents, teachers and all others involved in and child’s care can use social stories with the child to help connect and teach skills and behaviors the autism child may not understand or may find stressful.

 

The social stories can be used for all social skills deficits in autism from the very basic like mastering tooth brushing, wiping your nose, to the more complex like making friends, controlling behaviors, asking questions, being a good sport and so on they are very versatile, editable and usually visually rich following set guidelines and using appropriate text.

 

For many parents life after a diagnosis of autism can move forward significantly using social stories they can help their child feel more comfortable with skills, situations, events and behaviors their child is struggling with making family life tolerable and also life in school easier and less stressful for their child.

 

Generally all kids with autism respond well to social stories and huge success are normally reported for this excellent tool in the treatment for social skills deficits in autism.


To download and find out more about the benefits of social stories for kids with autism and how they help as a “significant” treatment for social skills deficits in autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Or any of the following sites are also good portals of social stories for kids with autism:

 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

 

 

A diagnosis of autism

Autism is probably one of the most common developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

A diagnosis of autism is always going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will almost certainly have the triad of autistic impairments which are deficits in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to the autism child ? Autistic children do not develop socially in the same way as typically developing children they lack the ability to recognize and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Typically developing children learn how to recognize the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to recognize certain expressions, postures and mannerisms, this ability is missing with autistic children.

 

Typically developing children are inquisitive and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviors. The autistic child lacks this natural instinct and will need direct teaching of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most significant issues parents report after a diagnosis of autism is their fear their child will not be accepted socially and will struggle to make friends.


There are now treatments and therapies available to parents over the internet such as social skills stories for autism. First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help autistic children learn and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

Parents, teachers and care givers use social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviors to autistic children. Written by experts, using appropriate language from the point of view of the autistic child always written in the first person and visually rich social stories explain the why, what, where and when to the autistic child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and get immediate download to 100 social skills stories for autism as well as excellent customer support.

 

Alternatively visit www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills and choose from various titles.

 

 

How to teach social skills to children with autism

A significant area of difficulty with the autism child is that of social and communication skills deficits. Typically developing children learn social skills through their environment, peers and family, they people watch both consciously and sub consciously.

 

With the autism child this ability to naturally learn social skills is missing. Autism is a developmental disability affecting the brain of the individual with autism. The development of social and communication skills is restricted and the autism child will need to be taught social and communication skills directly.

 

This can be achieved in a manner of ways. Generally parents of autistic children use social skills supports for autism such as social stories to help teach their autistic youngster appropriate social and communication skills.


All autistic youngsters have social skills deficits, however, that said all autistic youngsters are different and the severity of autism symptoms will vary between individuals.

 

Social skills stories for children with autism were first developed by therapist Carol Gray to help parents and educators cope with how to teach social skills to children with autism.

 

Social skills stories for children with autism are normally written by therapists or parents of autistic children to teach social and communication skills to children with autism and other developmental disabilities.


Written in the first person and from the point of view of the autistic child the social story teaches appropriate social, communication and behavior skills, using appropriate language and images the autistic child can understand and relate too.

 

To learn more about social skills stories and how to teach social skills to children with autism plus gain immediate download of 100 social skills stories for children with autism visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com

All expertly written with appropriate images to help teach social and communication skills to children with autism visit any of the following sites for social skills supports for autism http://www.autismsocialstories.com or any of the sites listed below and gain immediate downloads of social skills stories for children with autism…


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/howto

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