Archive for the ‘autism spectrum disorder’ Category

Teaching a child with ASD play skills

Thursday, June 5th, 2014

Kids with autism find play skills and social interaction with peers extremely difficult. 

 

This is due to their social skills deficits, which are common to all individuals with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), the degree of social skills deficits will depend on each individual, no two children will ever be the same.

 

A child on the autism range will undoubtedly have social skills deficits in three main areas of development, social interactions, communication both verbal and nonverbal and imagination skills.

 

Because of the child’s rigidity of thought and behaviour, and limited imagination or imaginative play skills, the child on the autism range may carry out ritualistic actions. For example lining up their Lego or sorting it into colours rather than playing with it.

 

A child on the autism range may focus upon minor details, for example rather than play with the toy car they may be obsessed with the wheel only and continuously spin it, rather than play with the whole car.

 

Plus with limited verbal and non-verbal communication skills the child with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) will lack the ability to converse naturally and may misunderstand the emotions, gestures, or ideas of others, and have difficulties understanding wit, humour and pretend play talk.

 

Kids with autism tend to be very literal, making pretend or imaginative play difficult for them to join in with or understand.

 

However there are techniques available that help build and promote play skills in children with autism.

 

One such technique is the use of social skills stories these can be adapted to suit individual’s needs, can be printed and used almost everywhere making them ideal in the home, school and out and about.

 

Consequently teaching a child with ASD play skills can be initiated using social skills stories as a means of showing the child with ASD how and why we play. By answering the “wh” questions: who, where, why, when and what as well as giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others. The social skills story acts like a role model or visual plan when teaching a child with ASD play skills by detailing the skill and breaking it down into small pieces.

 

Using visual images and first person text the social skills story can help the child with ASD better understand the skill or behaviour, therefore making them more comfortable with and in the situation, reducing stress and un-necessary anxiety.

 

To find appropriate social skills stories that help teach play skills as well as other social and communication skills and behaviours visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

ASD approaches

Saturday, February 15th, 2014

ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects the individual’s brain; normally diagnosed in early childhood.

A diagnosis of ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) is not the end of the world. The indicators of autism will vary between individuals, but generally kids with autism may display communication difficulties, and difficulties forming friendships with other people.

Kids with autism generally find it hard to make any sense of their environment. Often referred to as “Autism Own World”.

Research shows that in some kids with autism indicators may not present themselves until the child is between 1 -2 years of age.

What is autism? Here is a list of some of the possible indicators you may have noticed in your ASD child:

  • An ASD child may lack of the ability to direct others attention to what they want or need. Unlike a normally developing child, who will point or gesture towards the object in question.
  • Kids with autism rarely adjust their gaze to look at objects, and lack the inclination to look at something they are being directed towards.
  • An ASD child may have communication difficulties and find sustaining or beginning conversations difficult.
  • Sometimes kids with autism will be slow developing speech and sometimes speech may never actually begin.
  • They may engage in repetitive behaviours…for example repeating a TV commercial or rhyme etc.
  • They may confuse simple language terms, and use language in the wrong context, for example they may refer to themselves by name in a conversation or sentence, not by saying “I”; i.e. rather than saying “can I have a biscuit”, they may say “Ben wants a biscuit” and so on…
  • On occasions an autistic child may prefer to communicate by gesture rather than using speech.

Children with autism tend to prefer to be alone and find maintaining and indeed starting friendships with peers difficult. Children with autism and autistic people in general have difficulties in making eye contact which can make encounters difficult

An autistic child will struggle with interactive games and pretend play, failing to see what the point of the activity or game is.

 

 

Autism what is it? Understanding your ASD child and forming appropriate ASD approaches is very important and will make the difference in helping your autistic child reach his or her full potential

There are many ASD approaches to help kids with autism understand the world they live in…

One very effective way of accomplishing this is by the introduction of visual support tools such as autism social skills stories

Autism Spectrum Disorder is being diagnosed far more these days. Research into pervasive developmental disorder has suggested that using visual support tools such as autism social skills stories has impacted on the lives and families of those diagnosed with a pervasive developmental disorder such as ASD
(Autism Spectrum Disorder)

ASD approaches such as autism social skills stories are used for all situations and activities the ASD child may be confused by or struggling with, for example: Going to the dentist, the death of a loved one, a new car, brushing their hair.

For immediate download of autism social skills stories visit: www.autismsocialstories.com

Or alternatively visit any of the following sites for more information and social stories.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

 

 

What do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Monday, January 27th, 2014

Autism Spectrum Disorder is probably one of the most frequently diagnosed developmental disorders with 1 in every 150 children born receiving a diagnosis of autism. There is still as yet no cure for autism and research into its cause continues.

 

So what do I do after my child receives a diagnosis of autism?

Your child receiving a diagnosis of autism is probably going to be difficult to accept, the autism child will certainly have what is known as the “triad of autistic impairments” which are impairments in social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

So what does the triad of autistic impairments mean to your child?

Typically children on the autism spectrum have problems socially interacting and will not normally develop socially in the same way as a “typically developing” child the child with autism will almost certainly lack the ability to distinguish and read body language and facial expression.

 

This is often referred to as “mind blindness” or the “theory of mind”. Normally developing children learn how to distinguish the thoughts and feelings of other people as they grow by people watching they begin to distinguish certain expressions, postures and mannerisms this ability is somewhat diminished or completely missing in children on the autism spectrum.

 

Normally developing children are by nature very curious and will want to please, copy, mimic and learn social behaviours. The child with autism lacks this normal instinct and will need direct instruction of social and communication skills.

 

Probably one of the most important issues parents have difficulties with after a diagnosis of autism is their fear that their child will not be acknowledged socially and will struggle to make friends.

 

There are however treatments and therapies available to parents, guardians, teachers etc. which can be found on the internet such as social skills stories for autism.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago social skills stories for autism are designed to help children with autism gain knowledge of and remember social and communication skills from basic every day life skills such as washing, brushing teeth and using the toilet to more complex skills like accepting a new baby into the family, making friends, buying new shoes, even attending the hospital or dentist.

 

As a general rule all parents, teachers, guardians, teachers and care givers use autism social stories on a regular basis to teach and re-enforce appropriate social skills and behaviours to children on the autism spectrum.

 

Written by experts, teachers and parents using appropriate language always from the child’s point of view, using first person text and visually rich social stories for autism explain the why, what, where and when and how to the autism child.

 

To find out more about social skills stories for autism like autism and making friends visit www.autismsocialstories.com and obtain info and downloads of various social skills stories for autism

How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills?

Thursday, November 28th, 2013

Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder find social skills difficult and confusing this is due to their autistic deficits

What are Autistic Deficits?

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a neurological disorder which affects how an individual processes information, thinks, acts and reacts. The characteristics of autism are deficits in social, communication and imagination skills.

Typically children with Autism Spectrum Disorder are visual thinkers and learners, which means they think in pictures, therefore Visual Supports are of more benefit.

Visual Supports like social stories are used as a means of communication and as a method of support when teaching and re-enforcing skills and behaviours that the ASD child is finding difficult.

So: How do Social Stories Help Children with Autism Learn Social Skills

 

The answer is YES they can. Introduced around twenty years ago social stories are now one of the major Visual Supports used in the treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder and related conditions.

Social stories are short descriptive pieces of text which use visual images to describe a situation or skill using appropriate key points. Much like a comic script the social skills story can be easily implemented and needs no formal training to use.

Social stories are a role model or visual step by step plan of a skill or situation. Social stories should follow a set formula of sentence type: Descriptive, Directive, Perspective and control sentences in a manner the child with ASD will be able to follow easily.

Typically a social skills story will answer the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when and what as well as “HOW” and give an insight into the thoughts and feeling of others which is an area of marked weakness in most individuals with Autism.

Generally any treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder should be visual, easy to implement, and convenient for use in the home, as well as a t school and college.

A social skills story will help with transitions, changes to routines which is another area of difficulty for the vast majority of individuals with Autism, as well as learning new skills, changing behaviours, re-enforcing already learnt skills, in-fact almost all situations and skills the child with ASD is struggling with.

To learn more about how social stories are used, written and implemented visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com