Social Skills Teaching with Social Stories

Social skills stories are used for teaching and helping children with autism to understand social awareness skills, social interactions, communication, expectations, how to deal with routine changes, unfamiliar activities and much more…

The social skills story is a brief descriptive story which uses first person text and images/pictures that provide information regarding a social situation.

When children with autism are given information that helps them understand the expectations of a situation, their problem behaviour within that situation is reduced or minimized.

Social skills teaching with social stories provides a foundation/framework for the child on the spectrum to refer to/follow, thus making the situation more familiar. Typically most children on the spectrum will prefer sameness and will dislike unfamiliarity, to this end the social skills story is a real benefit.

By detailing the skill being addressed the social skills story uses images/pictures and short specific sentences which generally follow a set pattern of sentence type: directive – perspective – control – descriptive.

Social skills teaching with social stories typically needs no formal training stories can be obtained for various skills/situations that the child on the spectrum is struggling with from hygiene issues like puberty to going out and school related issues

A social skills story ia an autism resource which addresses the skill/situation by breaking it down into smaller easier to understand sections, using images and text it will answer the ever important “wh” questions – who, what, why, where and when as well as “HOW” and should also offer an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others which is an area of considerable weakness in most children with autism.

To learn more about how social skills teaching with social stories can be achieved please visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com 

Where you will find relevant information on social stories as well as other appropriate autism resources, such as communication cards, behaviour plans and so on.

http://www.autismsocialstories.com

Having Autism and finding friends

For most children with autism lacking social interaction skills is common. Many children with autism will want to make and have friends but will find this process confusing and stressful.

Lacking social interaction skills is often referred to as the autism triad of impairments but those autism triad of impairments will vary from child to child.

The actual degree a child is affected with the autism triad of impairments will generally depend on the individual’s social development.

Some children with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may have little or no language and may have other related disabilities. On the other end of the autism scale those children with asperger syndrome will often be schooled in mainstream schools and be of average to above average intelligence. This set of individuals will probably desire friendships.

Those children with asperger syndrome or mild autism will probably want friendships but making and maintaining those friendships will be a struggle, unfortunately it is believed around 40% of autistic children in mainstream education will at some point be a victim to bullying.

For most typically developing children recess and break times are a time of fun and a chance to run around and interact with their peers, this is “normal behavior”

However this is not the case with an autistic child, often the sound of the bell can fill them with fear and dread. Autistic children prefer structure, routine and dislike surprises, noises and the unstructured chaos of free time. They find choice making difficult and can sometimes be overwhelmed by recess and break times.

A lot of autistic children find recess confusing, there are a lot of choices to be made, what to play with, who to play with, what to do, so many choices a “typical child” will take for granted and enjoy, this is not the case with an autistic child.

For example a simple game, the autistic child may choose to join in with their peers, but may find comprehending the rules confusing, they may not understand the need for the rules, and then just as they start to understand the rules may change or the game may stop.

The other end to this is those children with autism that will stick rigidly to the rule and this can sometimes take the fun out of the game for the other normally developing children, they may loose interest and unfortunately the autistic child may not understand why this is and become distressed.

Some autistic children can become overwhelmed by noise, which can make recess or break time a painful and stressful time, you may find them pacing up and down in their own little world until recess is over and they can return to the routine and structure of the classroom.

All these factors can make autism and finding friends difficult to say the very least.

So how can you help with the problem of autism and finding friends?

Generally as we discussed earlier kids with autism prefer structure and routine, this can be achieved by the use of autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories, these resources are used in the classroom to add structure and routine the child’s day.

These autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism cope with recess and break times taking away some of anxieties they may feel around this time of the day.

The autism visual supports can also be used to help autistic children understand how to maintain friendships, by teaching the autistic child how to use conversation, how to pretend play, how to be kind, respect peoples feelings and personal space, how to share and make choices and so on, all social skills we take for granted, but an autistic child will need to be taught these social skills directly.

Therefore the perfect place to start with autism and making friends is with autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories to teach the autistic child the social skills necessary for making and maintaining friendships and dealing with recess and break times.

 

You can find appropriate social skills stories and other autism resources for kids with autism for download at:

 

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/stories.html

www.autismsocialstories.com/sensory.html

Autism products and resources

Do you have a child with special needs such as Autism Spectrum Disorder?

 

Do you need information on or for your child with special needs? Resources; safety equipment, soothing music even toys or games

 

In our well equipped autism store (with many featured amazon products) you will find plenty of autism products to suit every pocket and need all ready and waiting to be shipped or packaged off to you.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a complex disorder, affecting how the individual thinks, acts, communicates and behaves. This is due to social skills deficits which are always present in individuals with autism. 

 

There is no cure for autism but there are treatments for autism and autism products available to you which can help treat the symptoms of autism – social skills deficits, making life a whole lot easier!

 

One of the primary treatments for autism is: social skills stories Developed twenty years ago social skills stories excellent at helping with the symptoms of autism, used to help pave the way for positive behaviours, teach new skills, aid communication difficulties, help with transitions, changes to routines, unexpected occurrences and help autistic children see things from another persons perspective.

 

For many parents with autistic children finding autism resources and products as well as treatments for autism is difficult, but we think we have found the solution here at autismsocialstories.com

 

Our NEW Autism E-Store has just opened full of wonderful autism resources and products like: autism books, autism educational resources, autism clothing and accessories, soothing music, toys and games, as well as other autism resources such as safety equipment, video games, baby goods, e-books,  children’s books, health products and much more…

 

There are various treatments for autism available at autismsocialstories.com like visual support cards: Used to help with communication difficulties as well as teach and re-enforce skills and behaviours. Visual support cards can be used for visual schedules, now and next boards, choosing boards as well as reminders for things such as snack time, toilet time, hometime and so on…

 

There is no cure for autism, but life has just got a whole lot easier; with autism products like: autism books, autism educational resources, autism clothing and so on…

 

Whatever you need is all in one convenient place at autismsocialstories.com find our treatments for autism and autism products and autism resources all in one place.

 

For individuals with autism life can be stressful, sensory processing issues can affect an individuals sense of self as well as the other senses: sight, sound, touch, taste and smell by using treatments for autism like social skills stories, visual support cards and other autism products in our autism store you can help your child with autism deal with issues like sensory processing issues, as well as any other issues and troubles which can arise.

 

To take a look inside autismsocialstoreis.com and the NEW autism e-store visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com for the NEW Autism E-Store click the tab at the top of the page Autism E-Store

 

See you there!

Teenage years with autism

For the vast majority of us the teenage years are probably our most social years.

However for teenagers with an ASD this time can be incredibly confusing; moving from childhood, going through puberty, becoming sexually aware and ending up in adulthood, this rapidly moving social time can cause stress and anxieties.

Some teens with autism can become aware of how different they are from their peers, realise they don’t have many or any friends or a partner, or ideas for career choices.

For many teens with autism this will spur them on to learn appropriate social skills to “fit in”, for others it can mean isolation and in extreme circumstances even depression.

Deficits in social skills are the route cause of the majority of issues ASD teenagers encounter during this ever changing period of their lives.

For typically developing teenagers social skills are learnt naturally through watching, listening, intuition, gut feelings and good guess work! But for teenagers with an ASD these abilities are missing this is due to deficits in social skills.

Having a marked disability is social and communication skills can lead to social misunderstandings, for many parents, care givers and teachers this is a stressful and frustrating period in their teen’s life, being unable to communicate with your teen and watching them struggle socially is not easy.

However, there are excellent resources which can help the ASD teen address deficits in social skills; resources such as social skills stories are known to be beneficial around this time.

Developed primarily to aid communication difficulties social stories are a major tool used in autism to help teach and encourage appropriate social skills, address communication difficulties, prepare for changes to routines, transitions, teach age appropriate behaviours and social skills, teach about hygiene, puberty and other skills that they ASD teen is struggling with.

Social skills stories need no formal training to use; are editable which is a real bonus as no two ASD teenagers will ever be the same and we all use different expression and language.

Generally social stories are visual, individuals with autism are visual thinkers and learners; therefore autism resources which are visual are better understood and will have the greater impact for learning.

Using first person text and from the ASD teenagers point of view social skills stories for teens with autism are much like a role model, answering the “wh” questions – who, where, why, when, what as well as “how” plus giving an insight into the thoughts, feelings and emotions of others.

Social skills stories are easy to implement and can be used for a vast variety of skills, behaviours and situations, they are printable making them convenient and portable.

The teenage years with autism need not be to traumatic, using social stories as a strategy has proven effective for many teenagers with autism. To learn more about the teenage years with autism and how social skills stories for teens with autism can benefit your teenager visit:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autisticteen.html

Where you will find 65 social skills stories for teens with autism, on subjects like, puberty, hygiene, friendships, appropriate behaviours, social skills and many more.

Other sites offering social stories can be located at: 

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/hygiene

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/autistic_teens

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/asperger_adolescents

Which resources to use with an autistic child

Autism is one of the most common developmental disorders yet still it is misunderstood.

Being the parent of an autistic child is one of the toughest challenges a parent can face. However with early diagnosis of autism, the challenges can be lessened.

Understanding which resources to use with an autistic child can be confusing, with so many treatments for autism available, many parents struggle to understand and decide which resources will best suit their own individual child.

Unfortunately, the symptoms of autism can be severe in some children with an ASD, some children with an ASD may never develop speech may have other educational difficulties and seizures. While other children with an ASD may have average or above average intelligence, although in most cases speech will be slow to develop.

Although there is nothing that can be done to reverse autism, therefore a diagnosis of autism is a lifelong disability. However there are strategies parents of autistic children can use to help with the symptoms of autism.

So which resources to use with an autistic child? What is available and how can you access them quickly and easily?

Generally being the parent of an autistic child can be isolating, frustrating and confusing. Many parents of autistic children use resources such as autism social skills stories, to help their child develop age appropriate skills and behaviours that their typically developing peers are learning naturally.

Studies into the behaviour patterns of children with autism show that most autistic children are visual thinkers and learners no matter which end of the autism scale they are on. This knowledge helps us determine which kind of resources may be needed to help children with autism learn skills and behaviours effectively.

Generally visual thinkers and learners will better understand information when it is presented visually through images, pictures, graphs etc rather that through written words or orally. For children with autism on either end of the autism scale visual representations and information is better received and understood.

Visual resources for children with autism are available from many sites like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com  Visual resources for children with autism such as social skills stories can be implemented and used effectively to help show and teach children with an ASD appropriate skills and behaviours. For example social skills stories are used to help autistic children learn behaviours such as making friends, controlling negative behaviours, asking questions, sharing, taking turns, respecting personal space, using the toilet and so on.

Social skills stories are like a comic script, visual, colourful, use first person language, can be edited, printed and personalized. Social skills stories are like a role model detailing the skill or behaviour in appropriate language and images easy to use, follow and versatile, can be edited and convenient to use. Social skills stories are one of the most popular autism resources used today, and have great uses in the nursery, classroom, college, work place and at home or out and about they can be used in most situation the autistic child struggles with for example the dentist, a hospital visit, birthday party, school trip, wedding etc.

To find out more about social stories and there uses visit http://www.autismsocialstories.com or one of the following sites:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/preschool

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Having autism and finding friends

Many children with autism spectrum disorder do want to make and have friends. But having autism spectrum disorder can make this difficult.

Autism is a neurological disorder that affects a persons development in three main areas: social interactions, communication difficulties and imagination skills.

 

These developmental difficulties are referred to as the autism triad of impairments and it is this which hinders children with autism spectrum disorder.

 

The autism triad of impairments will vary from child to child as no two children will ever be the same.

 

Some children with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may have little or no language and may have other related disabilities.

 

By contrast for children on the other end of the autism scale, with for example asperger syndrome will often be schooled in mainstream schools and be of average to above average intelligence. It is generally this end of the autism scale, those with asperger syndrome and high functioning autism whom probably desire friendships.

 

For this set of children with asperger syndrome, high functioning autism or mild autism making and maintaining friendships will be a struggle. A staggering fact is that unfortunately it is believed that around 40% of autistic children in mainstream education will at some point be a victim to bullying.

 

A typically developing child in mainstream education will eagerly await recess and break times to let off steam and play with their friends, it is their time to run around and socially interact with their peers and have fun.

 

However for an autistic child, often the sound of the bell can fill them with fear and dread. Autistic children prefer structure, routine and dislike surprises, noises and the unstructured chaos of free time. They find choice making difficult will quite often become overwhelmed by recess and break times.

 

For many autistic children recess is a confusing part of the school day. There are a lot of choices to be made, what to play with, who to play with, what to do, so many choices a normal child will take for granted and enjoy, this is not the case for an autistic child.

 

For example a simple playground game that a typically developing child may enjoy, can be confusing to an autistic child. The autistic child may choose to join in with their peers, but may be unable to follow the rules of the game. For typically developing children this can be frustrating needing to stop and reconfirm the rules constantly. The child on the spectrum will not be deliberately being awkward, they probably do not understand the need for rules, and then just as they start to understand this set of rules, the rules may change, or the game may stop.

 

However, for some children with autism that do understand the rules this may also prove a problem, as they may stick rigidly to the rules which in some cases can take the fun out of the game for the other normally developing children. The typically developing children may simply loose interest and unfortunately the child on the spectrum may not understand why this is and become distressed.

 

Some children with autism spectrum disorder are hypo or hypersensitive and can become overwhelmed by noise, which can make recess or break time a painful and stressful time. They may be seen pacing up and down in their own little world until recess is over and they can return to the routine and structure of the classroom.

 

All these factors can make autism and finding friends difficult to say the very least.

 

So how can you help with the problem of autism and finding friends?

 

Generally as discussed earlier kids with autism prefer structure and routine, this can be achieved by the use of autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories, these resources are used in the classroom to add structure and routine the child’s day.

 

These autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism cope with recess and break times taking away some of anxieties they may feel around this time of the day.

 

The autism visual supports can also be used to help kids with autism understand how to maintain friendships, by teaching the autistic child how to use conversation, how to pretend play, how to be kind, respect peoples feelings and personal space, how to share and make choices and so on, all social skills we take for granted, but an autistic child will need to be taught these social skills directly.

 

Therefore the perfect place to start with autism and making friends is with autism visual supports such as autism visual schedules and social skills stories to teach the autistic child the social skills necessary for making and maintaining friendships and dealing with recess and break times.

 

You can find appropriate social skills stories and other autism resources for kids with autism for download at:

www.autismsocialstories.com

www.autismsocialstories.com/school

www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills

 

 

Strategies used for motivating students with autism

Autism Spectrum Disorder is a developmental disorder. The disorder is characterized by a set of symptoms known as the triad of impairments, these are:

 

Social interactions skills deficits

Communication skills deficits

Imagination skills deficits.

 

This triad of impairments or social skills deficits as they are more commonly referred to are common to all individuals with ASD (autism spectrum disorder).

 

Therefore students with autism will almost certainly display social skills deficits.

The autistic student will have social skills impairments which can affect their ability to communicate with and understand others.

 

The autistic student will lack social interaction and flexibility skills, preferring set patterns and routines, this inability to be flexible can cause stress and anxiety if routines are changed even slightly.


These social skills deficits can make understanding communication and social skills in the classroom and around school difficult for the ASD student.


It is true to say that individuals with ASD cannot easily behave in a typical “more normal” way. An autistic student will not purposefully disrupt the class; all autistic behaviour happens for a reason an external or internal (illness) factor.


It is these external and internal factors that trigger a negative autistic behaviour through sheer frustration with situations and with other people.


Teaching the ASD student is difficult. Strategies can be put in place that can help deal with the affects of the student’s social skills deficits, which can help the motivation and behaviours displayed by the ASD student.

Strategies used for motivating students with autism can include visual schedules, PECS, flash cards, autism symbols and social skills stories.


For the majority of students with autism a combination of all these autism resources is favourable. However for many students with autism probably one of the most useful autism resources available is social skills stories.


Social stories as strategies used for motivating students with autism are short visual strategies used to show a skill or situation that the student is struggling with. Using visual images and first person text the social story is used like a role model of the skill or situation. Detailing the skill by giving the student with autism the relevant social cues, answering the “wh” questions (who, where, why, when and what) and giving an insight into the emotions, thoughts and nonverbal communication shown or felt by others.


Easy to implement, personalize and with no formal training needed to use social skills stories are used widely in the classroom for dealing with issues such as staying on task, calling out, asking question, recess, P.E. lessons and so on.

 

To learn more about autism resources and strategies for motivation students with autism visit: http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school

OR

 http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Other autism resources such as autism symbols and flash cards are found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com/visual_aids

And social skills stories can be found at:

http://www.autismsocialstories.com


The symptoms of mild autism

Autism spectrum disorder is a complex neurobiological disorder, there is no cure for autism and typically the symptoms of autism will be ongoing throughout the autistic person’s life.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is characterized by varying degrees of autistic impairments often referred to as the triad of autistic impairments or social skills deficits.

 

These social skills deficits are typically displayed in the development of communication, social, imagination and interaction skills and abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors.

 

The symptoms of autism range from mild autism which is often called asperger syndrome to severe autism or low functioning autism.

 

The symptoms of mild autism can vary between individuals on the spectrum. Although all children on the autism spectrum disorder scale may exhibit some similar traits not every child will display all of characteristics associated with autism.

 

A child with autism on the lower end of the autism scale may never develop speech or it may be delayed and may have other educational disabilities, while a child with autism on the higher end of the autism scale can be high-functioning with average or above average intelligence and attend mainstream school.

 

Some autistic children have sensory processing issues in some or all of the senses and may display sensory processing issues such as being sensitive to the feel of fabric so much so that all tags must be cut out of clothing before they will wear it. Another child with autism may display no sensory issues at all.


However, all children with autism spectrum disorder will display social skills deficits with communication whether your child has the symptoms of mild autism or severe they will all have communication both verbal and non-verbal communication skills difficulties.

 

A child with autism will have difficulties relating to other people and will fail to understand non-verbal communication or body language.


Children with autism spectrum disorder are often referred to as having “mind blindness” or lacking the “theory of mind”. This means missing the ability to predict the thoughts, feelings and emotions expressed by other people.


For example we can tell a lot by a person’s posture, we can tell whether they are approachable, upset or happy, this ability to read another person is missing in people with autism.


However there are treatments available to people with autism that can help them learn social, communication, imagination and interaction skills.

 

The internet makes finding appropriate autism resources that help autistic people learn these social skills much easier. Generally most autistic people have found tremendous successes with autism resources such as social skills stories.

 

The symptoms of mild autism are such that generally most autistic children or asperger syndrome individuals can use social skills stories efficiently for coping and understanding social skills that they otherwise struggle to comprehend, which can sometimes lead to social blunders and stressful situations.


Sites that offer downloads OF SOCIAL SKILLS STORIES as well as expert advice and support like: http://www.autismsocialstories.com


 


Autism and finding friends

One of the major issues faced by parents of autistic children is whether their youngster will struggle to make and maintain friends with their own peer group.

 

Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting the brain; the symptoms of autism are dependant on how where the child is on the autism spectrum disorder scale.

 

A child with low functioning autism may have educational difficulties and speech will be delayed or may never develop.

 

Those children with asperger syndrome or high functioning autism may be of average or above average intelligence these groups of individuals are often referred to as geeks or little professors.


As with typically developing children no two autistic children are the same therefore the symptoms of autism will vary. But all autistic children will have the typical autistic deficits associated with the disorder, which are:

 

Autistic deficits is social, communication both verbal and non verbal, imagination and interaction deficits.

 

It is these autistic deficits which can make finding and maintaining friendships difficult.

 

Parents of autistic children report that autism and finding friends is made easier when the autistic child has been introduced to resources such as social skills stories.

 

First developed almost twenty years ago to help promote and teach appropriate behaviors and life skills social skills stories are now probably one of the biggest resources used by parents of autistic children, educators and professionals to help teach social skills like for example how to make and maintain friends.


Significant improvements in social skills and behaviors are reported once social skills stories have been implemented. The internet now makes it possible for parents to source autism resources such as social skills stories quickly and easily cutting waiting times and hassles.

 

Written by experts in autism social skills stories are used to teach and re-enforce social skills and behaviors; using appropriate language and visually rich social skills stories describe events, situations, behaviors and skills in the first person and from the autistic child’s point of view.

 

Download social skills stories appropriate for autism and making friends from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Autism social skills stories are also used to teach social, communication, imagination and interaction skills and behaviors.

 

Download immediately 100 social skills stories from http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 

Plus other autism resources and social skills stories from any of the sites below.

 


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/social_skills


http://www.autismsocialstories.com/school_resources

Grandparenting an autistic child

It is believed that every 1 in 166 grandparents will become the grandparent to an autistic child.

 

The diagnosis of autism can be stressful enough for any family and can sometimes lead to conflict between parents and grandparents.

 

Grandparenting an autistic child is stressful and confusing; both mentally, physically and on occasions financially.


There are many things grandparents can do to help their autistic grandchild overcome their challenges and get the most of life. From learning all you can about autism spectrum disorder and what the diagnosis of autism will mean to the entire family to helping support your autistic grandchild lean social skills.

 

Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition and is not curable; autism spectrum disorder affects more males then females.


Often the diagnosis of autism can have a huge impact on the entire family and cause marital issues between the autistic child’s parents. This is where a grandparent can be of support and help, easing tensions and generally helping out around the home and with the families other children can help.

 

There will be tough times ahead and being prepared by reading books, magazines, reports and articles on autism can provide answers questions that you may be struggling to comprehend.

 

A good source of autism resources can be found at: http://www.autismsocialstories.com

 


Where you can find autism tools and other autism resources that will help you understand and cope with grandparenting an autistic child.


Good luck!

 

 

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